Using your Mind's Eye

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  1. #1
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    Using your Mind's Eye

    Is this the last thing that comes as a person learns to draw? I am quite happy with my progress over only a few days. I am aware that to become great it is going to take years and I am willing to work for as long as it take. That being said despite my happiness with my ability to draw what I see my art from my minds eye is atrocious.

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    You know, it is okay to use reference. Most professionals do. Don't worry about drawing perfectly "from your mind's eye", very very very few people ever do.

    People often sketch things roughly from imagination, and then do research and gather reference to figure out how to make their imaginary thing look convincing, and then do a finished piece based on a combination of imagination, research, and reference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Epineferin View Post
    Is this the last thing that comes as a person learns to draw? I am quite happy with my progress over only a few days. I am aware that to become great it is going to take years and I am willing to work for as long as it take. That being said despite my happiness with my ability to draw what I see my art from my minds eye is atrocious.
    Great Googly Moogly, according to this post you've only been drawing SINCE MONDAY! Patience, Grasshopper.


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    Really, if Leonardo could say his hand was an inaccurate recorder of what he saw in his mind's eye, I'd say the rest of us have leeway.

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
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    A musical analogy:
    Drawing from observation is like playing a song. Working from your imagination is like composing a song. Obviously, you've got to learn quite a bit about music before you can start successfully writing your own. They are two interrelated, yet distinct, skill sets.


    Tristan Elwell
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    ...since Monday? Wow, I totally didn't notice the timeframe we're dealing with here.

    Right. Okay. So. Before you start worrying about any kind of progress whatsoever, just keep drawing for a while. A long while. More than a week. Give it at least a year before you fret about whether you're getting anywhere, if you worry about your progress every week it'll just be frustrating. This stuff takes time to learn, give it time.

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    I am not worried or unhappy with my progress, I was just wondering if it is something that usually take a while to perfect. This early in my studies I am not even sure what kind of artist I want to aspire to be. Really the point of this is to get an answer to the question, I find myself consumed by art now that I have begun to study it. I am seeing things in ways I have never seen them before, everything I see is now a question of whether I can draw it or not. Instead of looking at people I am finding myself gauging their features and where they fall on the face in relationship to the others. I hope to be able to talk art on here not just post pictures I draw. I do not have anyone in my life to talk art with so you all are my sole source of shop talk.

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    Heck, just learning how to work using reference takes a long time to perfect, doing it from pure imagination takes even longer. And what with readily available reference, it's not even all that necessary.

    Concentrating on the basics is really your best plan. Basic shapes, line, value, three dimensional shapes, perspective. That's some pretty meaty stuff right there, and it applies to almost every sort of art in some way.

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    Don't take this the wrong way and please continue to work on your art but... I'm sorry, you are consumed by art when you do it night and day for five or ten years and you think you are not progressing and everyone tells you to find a job but you keep going anyway. Then you are consumed by art. Doing something for a week is a distraction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    A musical analogy:
    Drawing from observation is like playing a song. Working from your imagination is like composing a song. Obviously, you've got to learn quite a bit about music before you can start successfully writing your own. They are two interrelated, yet distinct, skill sets.
    Going a bit off-topic here, but I've been meaning to ask something. When you start getting work and doing actual pieces, your time for practice goes down dramatically. How do you pros keep your skill level up to date? Considering the musical analogy, when you reduce playing and start composing, it is obvious that your playing skill is going to suffer. I recently had a two week break from observational drawing and when I came back to it, I had to draw four days straight to feel like I was back on my usual level.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taneli View Post
    Going a bit off-topic here, but I've been meaning to ask something. When you start getting work and doing actual pieces, your time for practice goes down dramatically. How do you pros keep your skill level up to date? Considering the musical analogy, when you reduce playing and start composing, it is obvious that your playing skill is going to suffer. I recently had a two week break from observational drawing and when I came back to it, I had to draw four days straight to feel like I was back on my usual level.
    With any luck, your paying work IS practice. I usually learn something on every major project I do, I know that... (might be something as minor as learning how to do something slightly more efficiently, but I usually learn something.)

    If you get stuck in a project with a long stretch of not-drawing, personal side projects can help keep you sharp (I always have several side projects I can dip into whenever I need a break from work.) Or you might want to set aside some drawing-for-the-heck-of-it time each day/week/whatever fits your schedule.

    I've had times where I got involved with long projects with not much drawing and neglected to keep practicing on the side, and I ended up getting horribly rusty (and cranky.) Now if that happens I try to get some solid drawing-time in at least one day of the week, or preferably every day, schedule permitting.

    (Heck, I'm stuck working on a long stretch of Interface Architecture right now - no drawing at this stage of the project, and it gets mighty irritating. But another hour or two of that and I'm allowing myself to go paint my Christmas card. )

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  19. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Don't take this the wrong way and please continue to work on your art but... I'm sorry, you are consumed by art when you do it night and day for five or ten years and you think you are not progressing and everyone tells you to find a job but you keep going anyway. Then you are consumed by art. Doing something for a week is a distraction.
    It seems I have made a mistake, with this type of attitude towards other people I am surprised this site continues. Don't take it the wrong way? are you shitting me? there is only one way to take what you said, I could not possibly be telling the truth because I have not been doing it for years? tell you what you elitist ass wipe, feel free to pull your bottom lip over your head and swallow, but no offense...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Epineferin View Post
    It seems I have made a mistake, with this type of attitude towards other people I am surprised this site continues. Don't take it the wrong way? are you shitting me? there is only one way to take what you said, I could not possibly be telling the truth because I have not been doing it for years? tell you what you elitist ass wipe, feel free to pull your bottom lip over your head and swallow, but no offense...
    Mmmmmonday.

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    dpaint's a serious real live professional. One of these days I'm going to take an afternoon and read through a bunch of "read all posts by dpaint" search results!

    It's an unfortunate result of internet discussions that affect and tone are frequently missing-- I don't think the OP was being insulted-- but the knee-jerk rage is kinda funny!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    It's an unfortunate result of internet discussions that affect and tone are frequently missing-- I don't think the OP was being insulted-- but the knee-jerk rage is kinda funny!


    Oh, Internets. Never change.
    *stares off longingly into the distance*

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