Anyone tried Genesis paints?

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  1. #1
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    Anyone tried Genesis paints?

    http://www.genesisartistcolors.com/ < These.
    This looks interesting.

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    They are heat-set oils. o_o They look kinda pricey but I'm honestly not that familiar with price of oil paints yet.

    Anyone tried these? Sounds like potential awesome.

    Arsh

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    First I heard of 'em, and my foremost concern would be permacy of the medium. They don't mention what they use, so it's hard to say without waiting some years and hearing the reviews.

    Also not sure if they've got much of a market. People who want to work slow have oils, acryilics were invented for those who wanna work faster. Alla prima painters won't want to have to carry a heat gun around (or its power source). Digital folk don't have to worry about this at all.

    Although I stick largely to watercolor, ink, and sometimes gouache... so maybe this is the killer product oil painters have been waiting for and I just wouldn't know it.

    If you've got the money to spare it probably wouldn't hurt to pick up a few colors, they do have that $18 try-out set.

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  5. #3
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    I'm not sure what's so amazingly different about them from regular oils, it's hard to tell from the description... Do they dry especially fast? I can't tell. Unless there's some significant advantage, I'm not sure it's worth the price.

    Drying fast with heat isn't anything special. ALL oil paints dry fast if you heat them. Many illustrators have used space heaters or similar to make their paintings dry faster... (I prop mine up by the radiator, works like a charm.)

    Some people also use regular oils but mix drying mediums into the paint to make it dry faster.

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    I think the idea is that the paint will stay wet until heated, which will cause it to set into a dried form. Kinda like a reverse encaustic.

    If it does work smoothly in that fashion, it could be nifty.

    -My work can be found at my local directory thread.
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  9. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anid Maro View Post
    I think the idea is that the paint will stay wet until heated, which will cause it to set into a dried form. Kinda like a reverse encaustic.

    If it does work smoothly in that fashion, it could be nifty.
    Yeah, I was wondering about that... I suppose that would be useful if you needed the paint to stay wet forever... It stays wet pretty long normally, though. Dunno. Depends on your priorities I guess, I've never had the need for oil paint to stay wet longer than it already does, really.

    (Also depends if this stuff works as advertised and isn't just plain weird.)

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  11. #6
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    I had first heard about this from reading from a couple of other artists on other sites who said they used this paint and LOVED it because they could do exactly what they wanted with it. If they were in a hurry to finish an illustration and needed a layer dry so they could continue, 10 minutes in the oven and BOOM like it'd dried for days naturally with no difference they could ever tell. They would then go on to paint the next layer and get their deadlines much easier for not having to let the painting wait so long. They also said it was GREAT for your brushes because the paint will never dry in them. You always have time to clean them up. And spills would be helluva easier to cleanup even if you missed noticing it and didn't get to it right away because they won't dry.

    So yeah... I see how it sounds awesome. I won't bother trying it until I've tried traditional oils. I just wondered if anyone had experience, or if not, if I could show something potentially useful to you guys.

    Arsh

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    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    I'm not sure what's so amazingly different about them from regular oils, it's hard to tell from the description...
    Stays wet indefinitely, until it's heated. Think Sculpey, but with paint instead of clay. And, I assume, with a similar synthetic binder, so calling these "oil paints" is probably misleading. They've been around for at least 20 years or so, but never gained much traction among easel painters, they seem more popular for crafts.


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  14. #8
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    If you click the gallery tab on that page there's actually a decent number of easel artists using them it seems. I mean, not that such a list is all inclusive either.

    I dunno. They just seemed nifty to me. I would probably try them some day when I'm better with paints to begin with. I just thought they seemed neat.

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