any constructive criticism will be appreciated

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  1. #1
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    any constructive criticism will be appreciated

    I can't afford to study in university or have a teacher, so I'll highly appreciate any critique, so that I can improve my drawings. All drawings are from my imagination.

    Thank you for your help!

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  2. #2
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    Whoa so many views, yet no comments.

    First of all awesome job!

    I really like your textures, they look awesome.

    If I had to say anything, it would be, don't be afraid to use solid black for shading. There seems to be a lot of soft lighting, try beefing up the contrast a bit.

    Good luck!

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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muddus View Post
    If I had to say anything, it would be, don't be afraid to use solid black for shading.
    *slap*

    Be very afraid of using solid black for ANYTHING
    . It flattens things out and looks awful if not done properly. You don't need a lot of dark colours for contrast or form, just take a look at zanglu's portraits;

    any constructive criticism will be appreciated

    What's worse, saying "for shading" makes it sound like to make colours darker you just add black, which is not correct. use darker versions of the same colour while varying the saturation.
    ------------------------------

    Anyhow. Zyryan, a couple things;

    If you want to be teaching yourself since you're not going to school, then you need to start learning. you don't learn by drawing stuff from your imagination over and over.

    You need to do some studies ASAP

    You simply lack a lot of knowledge about how things actually look. That tree for example in the last image barely looks like a tree. It's a blob of something that might look like a SYMBOL of a tree (big green triangle) but it certainly doesn't look like an actual tree. How do you remedy this? You draw a fuckton of trees while looking at them. just go outside for a while and draw trees. Than find some faces and draw them, then find nude people and draw them.

    You need to fill your mind with actual images of the world by drawing them over and over.

    You also have to learn how things work; how does light travel, what do shadows look like at different intensities, how does the human body work, where are the muscles, where are the muscles in the bodies of animals? There's a ton of things you need to learn in order to get better at realistic art.

    If I had to push you in a direction, I'd say start with landscape and nature studies first. Your figures are getting decent but whatever you put them in front of looks not so good. Trees, mountains, clouds, forests, plains, nature. Draw that.

    Another thing thing is to stop using so much of the soft brushes to blend. Learn how to make things good with the harder brushes first, and use the softer ones sparingly.

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Rainville View Post

    Be very afraid of using solid black for ANYTHING
    Ok. Agreed-to an extent... but what I ultimately wanted to say was, try put more contrast in.

    Recently I have a thing towards solid black. Try not to hold it against me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muddus View Post
    Ok. Agreed... but what I ultimately wanted to say was, try put more contrast in.

    Recently I have a thing towards solid black. Try not to hold it against me.
    If you're working from dark -> light then black can work, but I find that when starting from a bright background (especially if you're a beginner) black can easily be abused. It also creates some anomalies in printing.

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    Thank you for your comments, I haven't think of that. You are right, I will start painting more from life. I currently study anatomy books and watch a lot of tutorials and I'll continue to study them, but I'll try to paint from nature at least a 2 times per week.

    P.S. I sorry for that I can't edit my Thread, it sound like I'm complaining... I'm not I just need criticism, it realy helps me to improve

    I'll paint a view from my window tomorrow and I'll paste it here

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    I like the idea and composition of the second one and you seem to have put a great deal of effort in that one so here's some pointers on that picture:

    First off, the picture looks flat, like everything's on the same plane. In painting you have to use plenty of tricks to make the viewer perceive 2d in 3d
    - You have textures giving the same level of detail everywhere, causing the figure blend in the background. Textures capture the eye so you'll need to think carefully where you put it. Usually a good route to take is putting it to the focal point and leaving the less important parts like background less busy.
    - You have about the same contrast on foreground and background, again causing the figure to blend. Things get lighter and fade into a light, bluish grey when they get further away. On the foreground, you can place your darkest value and biggest contrast. Best way to study air perspective is just copying photos.
    - Skin tones look more like those of a plastic figure than a human. Your shadows seem too grey. Again, best way to learn is copying from photos or life. You have some pretty dark shadows on the light side too, like those defining the abdomen. Focus on shading the overall forms like the cylinders that the stomach and arms form more than individual muscles. That's more important to get a good sense of light.

    About anatomy, the proportions look right and the pose looks mostly natural and has a good sense of attitude IMO. On your other paintings, the poses look rather stiff though. There's always plenty of room for learning so try out some figure drawing classes if possible, metro sketching, posemaniacs.com and quick gestures from head. It all helps for sure. The first anatomy mistake on the warrior that caught my eye is that the nearer elbow's too low. The nearer hand and foot seem to be slightly weirdly positioned too. I don't know why he'd bend his wrist upwards like that and the foot doesn't seem to be firmly on ground (cast shadow would help but I think the foreshortening's a bit off too).

    Anyway, some good use of textures in places like Muddus said. The fur and leather straps on the warrior look great!

    Keep them coming!

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