Need Help with the Color and maybe tips on making the characters look more realistic?
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Thread: Need Help with the Color and maybe tips on making the characters look more realistic?

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    Need Help with the Color and maybe tips on making the characters look more realistic?

    I am uploading three images, I have been working on them for weeks now in Photoshop, but know there are ways to make it better, and am perfectly willing to use Painter since I just got it.

    I am looking for ways to make the image both more realistic, but also to have a major pop, any advice will be most welcome!

    The first one is meant to introduce the character to us, I imagine them like movie posters or promotional posters you would see around the city.

    The Second one is to show a different aspect of the character.

    The Last one is to show the character in action.

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    I like that second one, nice composition and the posture and tilt of the head on the figure is perfect.
    I think the first one has a lot of anatomy issues compared to the other ones, especially in the upper legs and secondarily in his torso/arms. Also, even considering the extra length of their hands, there seems to be too much arm/hand length behind the guy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wooblood View Post
    I like that second one, nice composition and the posture and tilt of the head on the figure is perfect.
    I think the first one has a lot of anatomy issues compared to the other ones, especially in the upper legs and secondarily in his torso/arms. Also, even considering the extra length of their hands, there seems to be too much arm/hand length behind the guy.
    Can you suggest what can be done to fix these anatomy problems? The hands I knew would be pushing it, but I could not figure out how else to do it with out it looking even more funky.

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    Reference. You've got more or less human anatomy with some alterations here, so work from real human anatomy first and apply your alterations after you've got a solid pose worked out. It shouldn't be too tough to find something more or less in the right pose, or you can shoot your own with a friend's help. Also, anatomy books that'll give you a better idea of the muscles and forms involved would help a lot.

    For proportions, that's something that usually is learned in the process of life drawing, as well as general figure drawing practice. If you haven't already, go take a look for the works of Andrew Loomis, especially Figure Drawing For All It's Worth. That should provide you with a good start.

    As to the art, I'd agree you've got some really good stuff going on in the posing and storytelling on the second one. A bit more refinement of the anatomy, maybe developing the environment a bit more, and you'll have a winner with that one. The first one, not so much. I'm not really sure what you're trying to convey. I'd recommend doing a few more thumbnails to see if you can't work out a clearer message. If you're trying to do these as posters, you want to convey as much as you can. Also, the pose looks broken, although that could be the point for all I know.

    As to the last one, it's just kinda bland really. There's motion, and there's a camera tilt, but it doesn't seem to have much drama to it. Again, thumbnails and better anatomy would do you a lot of good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezumi Works View Post
    Reference. You've got more or less human anatomy with some alterations here, so work from real human anatomy first and apply your alterations after you've got a solid pose worked out. It shouldn't be too tough to find something more or less in the right pose, or you can shoot your own with a friend's help. Also, anatomy books that'll give you a better idea of the muscles and forms involved would help a lot.

    For proportions, that's something that usually is learned in the process of life drawing, as well as general figure drawing practice. If you haven't already, go take a look for the works of Andrew Loomis, especially Figure Drawing For All It's Worth. That should provide you with a good start.

    As to the art, I'd agree you've got some really good stuff going on in the posing and storytelling on the second one. A bit more refinement of the anatomy, maybe developing the environment a bit more, and you'll have a winner with that one. The first one, not so much. I'm not really sure what you're trying to convey. I'd recommend doing a few more thumbnails to see if you can't work out a clearer message. If you're trying to do these as posters, you want to convey as much as you can. Also, the pose looks broken, although that could be the point for all I know.

    As to the last one, it's just kinda bland really. There's motion, and there's a camera tilt, but it doesn't seem to have much drama to it. Again, thumbnails and better anatomy would do you a lot of good.
    thank you! I am working on making new Envoroments for all three pictures now as that was something that bothered me too. The first one is mostly trying to introduce the character, I purposly chose the pose that way in the hopes of showing how he was trying to adapt to human mannerisims but failing. So hopefully I will be able to show you something much better shortly.

    How would you recomend adding more drama to the final image? I am really at a loss for what more I can do to it.

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    That's what the thumbnailing process is for. You take a page or two of little boxes to represent the picture plane and start playing around with position and arrangement, to experiment with the scene. It's usually a bad idea to run with your very first concept, so you do this to have a wider field to choose from.

    The thing about the third piece, to me, is that it's almost symbolic. The lack of emotion on the human's face (and again, that's where reference can be so important), and lack of body twisting to react to the attack, pushes it in that direction as well.

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    Thank you, beyond the drawing issues, any adivce on how I can paint it more realistically?

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