Proud Work vs Dead Work
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    Proud Work vs Dead Work

    I have a teacher that I consider as a client or a boss (The reason I consider her as a client or a boss... is because SHE DOES NOT TEACH. She demands! And if she doesn't get what she wants... you're fired!).

    Imagine the environment and atmosphere of the movie, "The Office". Except... there isn't any fun or games.

    Everyday, is the same day, you go on the computer, you do your work (data entry), and you make meets end.

    This is the environment and atmosphere I have for an Art class.

    I am having a small problem now.

    My teacher has looked over the project I am currently working on. She does not like how it is turning out at the moment, and thus suggested an idea that breaks my initial idea. I do not like it.

    The reason I do not like it, is because, I do not have any confidence in executing her idea. If I attempt to execute her idea, I believe.... I risk getting a worst grade than my initial idea. Thus the piece becomes dead... and something that I will not be proud of.

    This is where I ask the art community to help me decide.
    Should I stick with my initial idea and be proud of what I have done?
    Or should I break my soul like many office working, and just do the work?

    What would you guys have done?

    Last edited by Raiku; October 26th, 2010 at 08:07 PM. Reason: more info on client
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    Art education is for you, no one else. Do what you think will improve your own skills the most.

    That said, be prepared to sacrifice your own ideas the moment you get your first client. Sure, it's not always the case, but they are the ones paying you and will expect you to meet their demands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noah Bradley View Post
    Art education is for you, no one else. Do what you think will improve your own skills the most.

    That said, be prepared to sacrifice your own ideas the moment you get your first client. Sure, it's not always the case, but they are the ones paying you and will expect you to meet their demands.
    Hm. Perhaps, I thought of it the wrong way. It felt quite negative when she first approach me. But now that I think about it, I should accept this as a challenge to strive for a Win:Win scenario.

    Sorry for moping.

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    Listen to the teacher I think. Sometimes you don't see what they are actually trying to do and it looks like her only goal in life is to torment you. I had many boss-like teachers (not in art classes, but it's the same thing) - that I really hated. But when i look back i realize that i learned most from them and not the goody ones who let you do whatever you want and give you best grades for it. When you are out of school you will have all the time in the world to work on your ideas. But in my opinion you should profit from your time there.

    Maybe she is right. You feel like your idea is way better, but what if it's not? As i said students often don't see the whole picture, but teachers do.

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    If you lack the confidence to pull off her idea, then ignoring it is an option. however, yeah, taking the advice has a much more likely chance of being productive then non - and the challenge is always a step forward. If you want to stay in constant contact about the idea with the teacher, see if you take a step wrong that they'll be there to pull you back before the damage is too great, but I would take her idea, work it into my concept and take a crack at it for the hell of it.

    At the very least you'll learn not to do it again, at the most you'll have improved the idea. You've got to try and stay flexible either way, best way to approach a project.

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    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    So in other words you want a job that's safe and has no risks? Maybe it's time for a career change?

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    Meh. Proud work or dead work, you'll look at it in a few years and you won't even remember which is which. I look at all my early stuff and wonder why I ever felt so strongly over art that was so bad. In most cases I ended up redoing the drawing a couple of years later and doing twice as good a job in half the time.

    When you've done ten thousand drawings, only a very few are worth arguing over. The rest are just what you pile up so you can reach those very few.

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    when i started in art school it was smartest for me to just make stuff and like it. But now im on a point where i need to learn to make the client happy with my work. So it depends a bit on where in the process you are at the moment. In the end its a VERY powerful tool to be able to turn demands from clients you are not really happy with into a great piece, so i would say go for it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raiku View Post
    If I attempt to execute her idea, I believe.... I risk getting a worst grade than my initial idea.
    This should NOT be your main worry. In fact, it should sit far lower on the list than "am I learning something from this experience?"

    I fall into this trap too, but I'm finally beginning to see past it. A short-term grade issue pales in comparison with becoming a better artist in the medium and long term.

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    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
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