How to learn how to color without color picker ?
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    How to learn how to color without color picker ?

    Hello ! Here is my question.

    Im new to painting and i d like to know how to learn picking colors without you know ... " cheating ".

    I use to paint but using the color picker from painter to do that.

    I tried to do a painting without it and it doesnt really look like the actual photo plus it took me a long time to do it...

    So voila i'd like to learn the basic of painting / coloring. Any material welcomed.

    Thanks a lot people !

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    You can train your eye to match colors more accurately with practice.

    Just select what you think is the color in a picture and paint the color right next it in the photo, if it blends in and becomes part of the photo you know you have the right color.

    You can do this in traditional painting as well, mix your color and then hold it against whatever you are trying to paint and if the color seems to blend in you have the right color.

    No easy way to learn, just gotta keep trying and picking colors until you can consistently match the colors accurately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by toyotademon View Post
    You can train your eye to match colors more accurately with practice.

    Just select what you think is the color in a picture and paint the color right next it in the photo, if it blends in and becomes part of the photo you know you have the right color.

    You can do this in traditional painting as well, mix your color and then hold it against whatever you are trying to paint and if the color seems to blend in you have the right color.

    No easy way to learn, just gotta keep trying and picking colors until you can consistently match the colors accurately.
    Thanks a lot !

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    I started with pencil crayons. Kinda hard to cheat with those.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

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    Yep, I think the quickest way is to get out some acrylics or oils and start doing some color studies. I think this would work best from life and not from photos.

    Work from an extremely limited palette, only grab a new tube of paint when it is absolutely necessary. Most simple scenes can be painted with 4 or 5 tubes plus white.

    You don't need black since black almost never shows up in life. There are near blacks that you can make by mixing up the colors you are already using. I often make a 'black' out of raw umber and ultramarine. Although I have used other earth tones too. Pure blacks usually look wrong, and I personally think they mix lazily. If I want to darken or tone a color down, I usually use a darker color that is its near complimentary.

    Most areas people want to paint with black or a mix of black should actually be painted with a very saturated color. This goes especially for organic things like plants or people.
    For example: http://www.bouguereau.org/49231/Gabr...1890-large.jpg
    In the folds of her eyes and ears, and the darks of her lips. These are actually painted with a very deep and saturated red, not red mixed with black.

    Very carefully experiment and take your time getting the color right before you commit it to the painting. It is slow and a pain in the ass at first, but pretty quickly you'll be mixing up colors without really thinking about it, and achieving very accurate results.

    Hope this helps

    P.S. If you really want to learn color, you should be painting in full color right from the get-go. I do not recommend doing the monotone under-paintings that many people do. You can achieve very nice results from them, but for learning your colors I don't think there is a substitute for coming to understand the relationship between saturation and value by working in full color.

    Last edited by Spreggo; September 28th, 2010 at 12:28 PM.
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    Ilaekae is offline P.O.W.! Leader, Complete Idiot, Super Moderator Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    All the above...

    Get brush. Get paints. get something to paint on. Stick screwdriver in hard drive till it stops spinning. Problem solved.

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    You could always do something that isn't the photo right next to it.

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    I find that thinking in terms of color temperature helps; i.e., is the color I'm looking for warmer or cooler than its surroundings? And then making adjustments based on that.

    Also, it seems to me that matching the exact color of what you're painting is not nearly as important as getting the value and temperature relationships right. If you can accomplish similar relationships of value and temperature in your painting, it will look correct even if the colors themselves aren't the same.

    Last edited by jcpahl; September 28th, 2010 at 08:55 PM.
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    I have been in one of the most artisan cities in the world and not mused. Nate fuck you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spreggo View Post
    Yep, I think the quickest way is to get out some acrylics or oils and start doing some color studies. I think this would work best from life and not from photos.

    Work from an extremely limited palette, only grab a new tube of paint when it is absolutely necessary. Most simple scenes can be painted with 4 or 5 tubes plus white.

    You don't need black since black almost never shows up in life. There are near blacks that you can make by mixing up the colors you are already using. I often make a 'black' out of raw umber and ultramarine. Although I have used other earth tones too. Pure blacks usually look wrong, and I personally think they mix lazily. If I want to darken or tone a color down, I usually use a darker color that is its near complimentary.

    Most areas people want to paint with black or a mix of black should actually be painted with a very saturated color. This goes especially for organic things like plants or people.
    For example: http://www.bouguereau.org/49231/Gabr...1890-large.jpg
    In the folds of her eyes and ears, and the darks of her lips. These are actually painted with a very deep and saturated red, not red mixed with black.

    Very carefully experiment and take your time getting the color right before you commit it to the painting. It is slow and a pain in the ass at first, but pretty quickly you'll be mixing up colors without really thinking about it, and achieving very accurate results.

    Hope this helps

    P.S. If you really want to learn color, you should be painting in full color right from the get-go. I do not recommend doing the monotone under-paintings that many people do. You can achieve very nice results from them, but for learning your colors I don't think there is a substitute for coming to understand the relationship between saturation and value by working in full color.
    Oh well thanks but i don't have any traditional stuff with me ... ( apart from watercolors ) . I'm trying to be a digital artist ^^ ( mainly cuz there is barely no art supply in this country ... dontask what country i am in xD ... ) but thanks for the tip ... i'm taking notes for futur use !

    Again thank you !

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    << red/green deficient!!!
    Not a damn suggestion will help me
    I prefer to use things like ColorSchemer, it helps with keeping color pallets and groups together such as synchronous, async, monochrome and the like.
    At the end of the day though, when it comes to digital work/design I rely on the RGB values to make sure i am consistent across the board.

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  15. #12
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    "and it doesnt really look like the actual photo"

    BLAM! You're doing it wrong.

    Even if you match the colors with a photo, you'll only have a copied photo. A portrait of a photograph. It's a pointless thing to do.

    Instead, get some brushes and board, and start doing tonal work with black and white paint. Working in black and white prepares you to work in color; without tonal foundation, color will not work.

    When you are confident in tonal work, add a tube of red ochre. Black, white and red allow you to mix a lot of warm and cool tones. Work with that for a while.

    After that, try a triad: red ochre, phthalo blue, and cadmium yellow light (plus black and white).

    Then a split triad: warm (red ochre, phthalo blue, yellow ochre) and cool (alizarin, ultramarine, cadmium yellow light) plus black and white. That gives you nearly every color you need. You can extend that palette with spot colors later.

    Only then go back to digital. (If you still want to.) You'll be surprised at what difference it makes.

    But DO NOT WORK FROM PHOTOS! Work from life. It takes a lot of skill to decipher a photo; it only seems easier.

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