Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    945
    Thanks
    228
    Thanked 125 Times in 122 Posts

    Is art jobs really competitive?

    Maybe I am overthinking and overanalyzing things because I'm still new in the art world but is it the real reason that most people can't get a career in art is not only because it is so competitive but is because most of artist just don't know how good they have to be?
    Most people I've seen looks like they are messing around
    Last edited by PeteJ; November 4th, 2010 at 05:38 AM.


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,069
    Thanks
    992
    Thanked 2,185 Times in 755 Posts
    Your competition isn't just your classmates, it's everyone. That means you better be able to draw better than 98% of the members here if you really, really want a job.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Noah Bradley For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    384
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
    Plenty of talented artists out there. Competition is now all over the world too. So you not only need to be good, but good at marketing too.

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Arizona, USA
    Posts
    1,084
    Thanks
    506
    Thanked 632 Times in 355 Posts
    Careers in art are very competitive; some more than others. It does really depend on what career path you would like to go down. I wouldn't say you outright have to be better than 98% of the people here to find work. Being incredibly skilled is the huge part of the equation, but it also comes down to networking, self promotion, professionalism, motivation, marketing, and a host of other factors.

    It is true that students are not your main competition when you go out for jobs. People go to school to improve their skills and I wouldn't really expect a ton of seniors to be holy hot shit by graduation time. I think what counts is where they came from, how much they improved, and if they are still willing to study and improve after school is over. You never know, one of those "crappy" seniors can take a year off, make a good portfolio, and land some jobs.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,206 Times in 1,056 Posts
    When you say "students" are you talking high school students, college students in a regular college, college students in an actual art school, or what...?

    Because your competition is not going to be students. It's most certainly not going to be high school students. It's going to be ALL the graduates of all the art schools in the world, including all the best students; and ALL the professionals out there who have already been working for years and years; and everyone on this site, and everyone on other sites, and, yeah, basically all the professional artists in the world.

    Anyway, if you are talking about high school students, there are very few high school graduates who are really pro level, generally it takes at least a few more years of hardcore training and practice that aren't available in high school. And regular college art classes are hit-or-miss, some schools have good art departments, some have pretty useless classes, and they all have a fair share of lazy students who aren't really trying. Even art schools can have some crummy classes, and lazy students who cruise through four years with barely any improvement...

    Anyway, it's not so much the classes as what you do with them, and how much you practice on your own... the more you put into it, the better. The lazy students aren't going to be your competition, so don't be lulled into thinking you can be lazy.

    Also remember that grades mean nothing in the real world. Portfolios are what matter.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    945
    Thanks
    228
    Thanked 125 Times in 122 Posts

    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    When you say "students" are you talking high school students, college students in a regular college, college students in an actual art school, or what...?

    Because your competition is not going to be students. It's most certainly not going to be high school students. It's going to be ALL the graduates of all the art schools in the world, including all the best students; and ALL the professionals out there who have already been working for years and years; and everyone on this site, and everyone on other sites, and, yeah, basically all the professional artists in the world.

    Anyway, if you are talking about high school students, there are very few high school graduates who are really pro level, generally it takes at least a few more years of hardcore training and practice that aren't available in high school. And regular college art classes are hit-or-miss, some schools have good art departments, some have pretty useless classes, and they all have a fair share of lazy students who aren't really trying. Even art schools can have some crummy classes, and lazy students who cruise through four years with barely any improvement...

    Anyway, it's not so much the classes as what you do with them, and how much you practice on your own... the more you put into it, the better. The lazy students aren't going to be your competition, so don't be lulled into thinking you can be lazy.

    Also remember that grades mean nothing in the real world. Portfolios are what matter.
    Some of these people I'm talking about are in college.
    and I know I can't be lazy.
    Last edited by PeteJ; November 4th, 2010 at 05:39 AM.

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
    Posts
    819
    Thanks
    79
    Thanked 87 Times in 62 Posts
    Knowing the right people and having the necessary skills are the keys to getting a job. Art directors get hundreds of emails a day with resumes from people wanting to work. Most of these people don't realize how much skill they lack because they've been told they're the best, or they think they've peaked and are ready. It takes five seconds for a company to look at a resume alone and say NO. They won't even look at your work. That's why it's so important to go to conventions and get hands on feedback from industry professionals. Most artists are frightened of criticism. Being an artist can be brutal. Everyone is a critic but at the same time...it helps.
    My SkEtChBoOk

    [URL="www.wftogame.com
    [/URL]

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    945
    Thanks
    228
    Thanked 125 Times in 122 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by RoboBobo View Post
    Knowing the right people and having the necessary skills are the keys to getting a job. Art directors get hundreds of emails a day with resumes from people wanting to work. Most of these people don't realize how much skill they lack because they've been told they're the best, or they think they've peaked and are ready. It takes five seconds for a company to look at a resume alone and say NO. They won't even look at your work. That's why it's so important to go to conventions and get hands on feedback from industry professionals. Most artists are frightened of criticism. Being an artist can be brutal. Everyone is a critic but at the same time...it helps.
    I thought they look at your portfolio first, then the resume.
    no kidding about the criticism part, everyone is so nice when it comes to criticism in class.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,206 Times in 1,056 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by PeteJ View Post
    I thought they look at your portfolio first, then the resume.
    no kidding about the criticism part, everyone is so nice when it comes to criticism in class.
    Depends what kind of jobs we're talking about. If you're looking for a full-time position, they may have certain qualifications like "must have ten years of experience in X", so they might check resumes first.

    For freelance work, it's the portfolio that counts. Heck, sometimes no one needs to see your resume at all. (Though a good resume does help show that you have experience - it makes you look reliable, art directors like people who are reliable.)

    (I'm not sure what class you're taking there, but it doesn't sound like the best class in the world...)

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    945
    Thanks
    228
    Thanked 125 Times in 122 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    Depends what kind of jobs we're talking about. If you're looking for a full-time position, they may have certain qualifications like "must have ten years of experience in X", so they might check resumes first.

    For freelance work, it's the portfolio that counts. Heck, sometimes no one needs to see your resume at all. (Though a good resume does help show that you have experience - it makes you look reliable, art directors like people who are reliable.)

    (I'm not sure what class you're taking there, but it doesn't sound like the best class in the world...)
    my teacher does encourage strict criticism but but most people just dont say very much and only point out the obvious. Actually this teacher I have is really good
    Last edited by PeteJ; November 4th, 2010 at 05:40 AM.

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,504
    Thanks
    3,149
    Thanked 6,558 Times in 2,766 Posts
    Art jobs aren't much more competitive than other highly sought after jobs. Part of it is as you say the skill level weeds out many applicants. Jobs that take less skill have many more applicants; testers for example.
    In house positions are easier to find than freelance nowadays because everyone wants you in house to micro-manage your work. As a freelancer you are competing with a much larger pool of people but again they are weeded out by language barriers and other problems that distance creates.
    When I was an AD most freelancers got hired had to be within driving distance of the company so they could come in once and awhile for a face to face. Unless they were really good and we were only using them for a short time or a one off it was important to interact with the teams.

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,206 Times in 1,056 Posts
    ...It's also going to vary a bit depending on what kind of work you're looking for. Some things may be primarily in-house or require you to be physically available (a lot of animation and concept art jobs, for instance) - in which case you'll be competing with a smaller pool of people; other work might be primarily freelance and non-location-specific (editorial illustration, childrens books, book covers, etc.) - in which case you may end up competing with a global market, depending on the client.

    I've worked on projects where the team was spread out across as many as five different countries... Then again I've worked on other projects where the client wanted to keep everything local. So it depends.

    Be prepared to market yourself like heck.

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    945
    Thanks
    228
    Thanked 125 Times in 122 Posts
    So it helps if you live in places like California?

    I have notice quite a number of highly successful artist here came from Los Angeles or some where around CA

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    A bunch of different places.
    Posts
    635
    Thanks
    299
    Thanked 509 Times in 230 Posts
    Yes, it can help to live in a place like California.

    It will probably help you more to be the ultimate badass who's also not a tool.

  17. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Two Listen For This Useful Post:


  18. #15
    Randis's Avatar
    Randis is offline ( ゚∀゚)/ ♥♥♥ おっぱい!おっぱい!
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Bucharest/Berlin
    Posts
    2,588
    Thanks
    96
    Thanked 3,057 Times in 945 Posts
    it is not always about the skill.
    It is a bit like selling cars.
    Currently working on my indie RPG , please check out
    DRAGON FIN SOUP on KICKSTARTER
    Please support my Project!
    - - - - - - - - - -
    My finished paintings and other work

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to Randis For This Useful Post:


  20. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    384
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
    Keep in mind, alot of the people you are in school with won't get a job in the art industry. the will go work at starbucks or something. your job is to not be one of them. hanging around this website will give you a much better indication of what it takes to be a pro.

Similar Threads

  1. Non-Competitive Comics...
    By Ilaekae in forum Panels of the Week
    Replies: 52
    Last Post: December 21st, 2014, 10:30 PM
  2. The competitive-ness level of the art field?
    By aerisaxia in forum Art Discussions
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: July 25th, 2012, 06:36 PM
  3. MICA Competitive Scholarship for Returning Students Advice
    By mmp12 in forum Education & Schools for Artists
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 1st, 2011, 04:51 PM
  4. €‡€ Professional Graphic Design / Illustration @ Competitive Rates €‡€
    By jfarsenault in forum Artists Available for Work!
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 11th, 2007, 02:16 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.