Portrait of a young girl

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Portrait of a young girl

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    194
    Thanks
    111
    Thanked 43 Times in 28 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Portrait of a young girl

    Hi everyone!

    Man, did I bust my ass on this one. If you see some of my previous portraits, I think you will agree that my progress has been significant since I joined this forum along with all of you incredible artists! Thanks for all the help so far

    (example of previous crappy abandoned portrait) http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=192261

    So yeah, I'm very proud of this one. But I'd love to hear any further suggestions you have regarding what/how I might have done better?


    Here's the reference photo:

    http://usera.ImageCave.com/common/jena%20web.jpg

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Vienna
    Posts
    52
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey there, I like the approach you took, but it looks too flat at the moment in my opinion, besides, it seems as if you tried to rush the shoulders plus you definitely need more depth in order to make the portrait-thing work.

    I would suggest, that you skip the photo-reference for the moment and maybe use ur own drawing as reference - maybe also try to lose the self-imposed boundaries of having to copy her, instead go crazy and create picasso-esque versions or monochromatic versions of the young lady, give the inner artist a bit more space.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    44
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It's an improvement form your old sketch, since you tried to incorporate the lady entirely from the photo..

    But take it to the next step and create accurate values in the face of the person. While the values in a person's face is somewhat "subtle" compared to an object such as a car, the values in your picture is far too light to depict her accurately. Maybe you were focusing on the placement of her features more so than how they fit into her face.. (there are stronger shadows under her brow, eyes and to the left of the face and even under her chin.)

    The only other thing is that the shoulders are somewhat awkward, because you left out the folds of the clothing but used enough line to define some sort of object there.

    Anyway, have fun and keep trying! Progression is awesome!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    4,046
    Thanks
    2,334
    Thanked 2,298 Times in 1,410 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    With your approach, you're missing a ton of characteristic features you could have seen in the photo.

    May I suggest you focus on rendering the lighting using the "planes" method? Construction "wireframe" drawing might help, too.

    Above all, try to do these exercises from life, not from a photo. It takes a considerable skill to get all the subtleties from a photo; with a live subject or even a statue, it is much easier.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    194
    Thanks
    111
    Thanked 43 Times in 28 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Xeraelus View Post

    But take it to the next step and create accurate values in the face of the person. While the values in a person's face is somewhat "subtle" compared to an object such as a car, the values in your picture is far too light to depict her accurately. Maybe you were focusing on the placement of her features more so than how they fit into her face.. (there are stronger shadows under her brow, eyes and to the left of the face and even under her chin.)
    Hi, thanks for the critique! This reply also goes out to Alabastar:

    The reason I kept the face shading light is because of the light shading I had observed in some Old Master portraits, for example:

    http://www.christchurch-southgate.or...en_drawing.jpg

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_dLSVgS5AxB...Waterhouse.jpg

    I agree that my portrait looks flat. Why do you think the light shading works in these drawings, and not in mine?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    194
    Thanks
    111
    Thanked 43 Times in 28 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    With your approach, you're missing a ton of characteristic features you could have seen in the photo.
    Urgh, I was afraid someone would say that.

    May I suggest you focus on rendering the lighting using the "planes" method? Construction "wireframe" drawing might help, too.
    What's the "planes" method? Could you please briefly explain this, or link me to a source? Thank you!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    4,046
    Thanks
    2,334
    Thanked 2,298 Times in 1,410 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The source for "planes" method is Andrew Loomis, you can find his books at fineart.sk. You'll want "Drawing Head and Hands", most likely, but the rest are worthwhile too.

    Basically, instead of groping for smooth shading, you break down the form into distinct planes, each more or less evenly lit. It is a good exercise to study lit form, but thinking of planes helps to see the correct structure even if you do not render the actual planes.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,159
    Thanks
    138
    Thanked 418 Times in 398 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey, to answer your question about the difference between those master drawings and what you've done - if you look at those master drawings, overall the faces look light, but if you look closer, you see very directed and confident areas of shading that define key features of the face, especially around the eyes where there is most depth going on. Looking at your drawing, it's mostly a line drawing with extremely light and very uncertain/unconfident shading. I think you do need to really think of the face (and really anything else you want to draw realistically) as a 3D object that can look very different depending on how light is hitting it.
    Look at the ref picture and you immediately know that there is light coming from the right, but in yours, it's like you took light out of the equation.

    Aside from shading and lighting, I think you also need to really study the features of your subject to get down the key discerning features. On a face obviously, the eyes are very crucial but the eyes and eyebrows that you drew do not look like the ones in the photo which is fine if you weren't really going for likeness as much as practicing drawing style. Nevertheless, I feel that it's always good practice to be able to draw exactly what you see whether the reference is from a photo on in your imagination.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to wooblood For This Useful Post:


  11. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    194
    Thanks
    111
    Thanked 43 Times in 28 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    The source for "planes" method is Andrew Loomis, you can find his books at fineart.sk. You'll want "Drawing Head and Hands", most likely, but the rest are worthwhile too.

    Basically, instead of groping for smooth shading, you break down the form into distinct planes, each more or less evenly lit. It is a good exercise to study lit form, but thinking of planes helps to see the correct structure even if you do not render the actual planes.
    Thank you! ps I really like your sketchbook. Some of those cartoons are really funny!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Gislebertus For This Useful Post:


  13. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    194
    Thanks
    111
    Thanked 43 Times in 28 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by wooblood View Post
    Hey, to answer your question about the difference between those master drawings and what you've done - if you look at those master drawings, overall the faces look light, but if you look closer, you see very directed and confident areas of shading that define key features of the face, especially around the eyes where there is most depth going on. Looking at your drawing, it's mostly a line drawing with extremely light and very uncertain/unconfident shading. I think you do need to really think of the face (and really anything else you want to draw realistically) as a 3D object that can look very different depending on how light is hitting it.
    Look at the ref picture and you immediately know that there is light coming from the right, but in yours, it's like you took light out of the equation.

    Aside from shading and lighting, I think you also need to really study the features of your subject to get down the key discerning features. On a face obviously, the eyes are very crucial but the eyes and eyebrows that you drew do not look like the ones in the photo which is fine if you weren't really going for likeness as much as practicing drawing style. Nevertheless, I feel that it's always good practice to be able to draw exactly what you see whether the reference is from a photo on in your imagination.
    Thank you so much! In my defense, the shading is a bit stronger in the original; my scanner if crap. Nevertheless I see what you're saying, and there is no doubt that my shading indeed lacks confidence! I was very slow and careful with everything regarding the face, worried I might mess up, and maybe lack of confidence is what shows.

    Regarding the eyes, could you maybe go into a bit more detail as to what I did wrong? Like I said, I was extra careful, and in fact I spent about 8 hours on the eyes alone, zooming close in with my computer. I have no formal training, so if you could maybe give me a few pointers it'd be much appreciated!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    228
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 9 Times in 8 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Another problem here; to give you a scapegoat, is the photograph itself is flat. It's a little low contrast.

    But we can't really blame the inanimate object. I get the feeling your were a little scared halfway through, of ruining it by referring to a photo that wasn't really giving much up in the way of reference.

    I'd suggest you learn to not be scared of interpreting these soft-lit photos, and go ahead, but if you are invested in this piece, then you can always crank up the contrast of the photo, to give you an idea of what really needs to be shaded to give an impression of form.

    TR Sketch Group
    Macar, Pound
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    194
    Thanks
    111
    Thanked 43 Times in 28 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Pound View Post
    Another problem here; to give you a scapegoat, is the photograph itself is flat. It's a little low contrast.

    But we can't really blame the inanimate object. I get the feeling your were a little scared halfway through, of ruining it by referring to a photo that wasn't really giving much up in the way of reference.

    I'd suggest you learn to not be scared of interpreting these soft-lit photos, and go ahead, but if you are invested in this piece, then you can always crank up the contrast of the photo, to give you an idea of what really needs to be shaded to give an impression of form.
    Thank you so much!

    Everyone has been so helpful here, thank you! I've decided to leave the drawing as is, and to apply everything I've learned from your critiques to my next portrait, which I'm working on presently and am already seeing great progress. I think the main points learnt were: a) more contrast; and b) to be a bit more relaxed/confident when drawing.

    Thanks!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •