Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    945
    Thanks
    228
    Thanked 125 Times in 122 Posts

    Drawing everything I see

    I'm doing a quick study of my backyard. I was sitting under a tree while I am doing this. The "tent" you see in the drawing is used to keep my dogs in there.


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    405
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 244 Times in 96 Posts
    I think it is great that you are sketcing what you see. Although I like the rough look to this piece, I think (just an opinion here) that maybe you could start to render and sketch what you see a little tighter and so that the images are a little more defined and clearer. I also think it would benefit you to work on perspectives a bit (like 2 point perspective). Good luck, hope this helps.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    945
    Thanks
    228
    Thanked 125 Times in 122 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by shrunkendesigner View Post
    I think it is great that you are sketcing what you see. Although I like the rough look to this piece, I think (just an opinion here) that maybe you could start to render and sketch what you see a little tighter and so that the images are a little more defined and clearer. I also think it would benefit you to work on perspectives a bit (like 2 point perspective). Good luck, hope this helps.
    Oh I appreciate your critique.

    But to me it is kind a hard to work on perspective with all so many objects, any suggestions for that?

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    405
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 244 Times in 96 Posts
    I guess I would start by doing some perspective lines. Draw the horizon and look at some slants and guess where the vanishing points are. When putting objects into the planes, try to imagine wire frame boxes around them and place them according to the vanishing points. Of course, keep all these construction lines nice and light so you can mask them easier. I'm no expert myself but thats what I'd do.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Take more time on studying everything as shapes, you seem to be just scribbling in some parts to replace the real information. Be more accurate on line quality; make it so things feel solid, not wobbly.

    Actually, you should get some charcoal or a soft pencil (it looks like you're using a pen or just fine lines with a pencil; use the broad side of your pencil to get larger strokes), start using shadows to convey information instead of lines. Lines don't actually exist in space, they're just used to show information between negative/positive space or a super simplification of shadows. So start separating negative/positive space by shadows, your drawings will look more real. You can use lines to help place information but you should end with shadows; I promise you it'll look more "real"(also ensure you get a good idea of where the light source is).

    Perspective, you can do it the tough way or you can just get a general 'feel' for it, not as accurate but would be faster. I suggest checking out Ten Minute Drawing Tutorials (http://www.youtube.com/user/moatddtutorials), he can help you get that feel. This isn't to imply perspective can't help you but I think thats better for imaginary scenes (or for really long drawings). The perspective is already cut out for you when drawing from life. Plus, its constantly changing due to you looking at the paper, then looking back up; there will always be that slight change... though I guess perspective could help in that situation too. I still say learn perspective if you don't know it. Just don't rely too heavily on it, it can become pretty tedious, unless you don't mind that.

    Another thing you can do are construction drawings, this helps especially with living things, try breaking things down into shapes as simple as possible. Getting a likeness for anything isn't in the small details, its about the big shapes. I uh, hope this has helped, good luck with your drawing adventures.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi,

    As I've been looking into your drawing, it was really good. I like the way on how creative you are. But it seems that some critique here was also helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. SketchBook: Drawing newbie: Requesting critique and advice for my drawing journey
    By Nerrabyte in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: April 28th, 2013, 02:13 PM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: June 13th, 2011, 11:51 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 21st, 2010, 08:46 AM
  4. Quick Sketch Videos - Head drawing and Figure drawing
    By conceptartist in forum ART TUTORIALS, ART TIPS & ART TRICKS - ARCHIVE
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: October 2nd, 2009, 09:57 PM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: August 25th, 2008, 08:13 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.