Is there a system to do perspective without vanishing points
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Is there a system to do perspective without vanishing points

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    202
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 19 Times in 19 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    First of all, you have to remember that every object involves the use of perspectives. Think of everything as a series of single shapes. Spheres, rectangles, pyramids, etc,. (i.e. a room is a really big cube). That is an absolute fundamental that you must ALWAYS keep in mind when you are drawing anything. So, perspective is a thing you will always have to contend with.

    That being said, our eyes have a way of making us THINK we see something but it actually isn't. You may think the side of a cube slats one way but when you really look at the angle, you could be way off. This is a problem that can only be avoided after a lot of practice, after you have trained your eye to see perspective as it really is. This means that you will have to deal with vanishing points or at least keep them in mind. By doing this, you will avoid having oddly sloped objects that seem to float in space and that sort of thing. It may be more fun to just churn out something awesome. The technical stuff can be redundant but stick with it, you'll thank yourself later.

    See my Sketchbook!!!!!!!!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    170
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 125 Times in 70 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Is there a way to do perspective without using vanishing points and get it mathematically perfect? Nah. Probably not. Unless your brain is a computer and you have an ultra-steady robot arm.

    Is there a way to do it at without using vanishing points, and get it as near to right as it needs to be? Yeah, of course. Eyeball it. Unless you're drawing complicated architecture, you can probably guesstimate to your satisfaction. And of course there's nothing wrong with setting up the vanishing points and double checking if it looks off.

    Can't eyeball it and make it look right? Study and observe more.

    Edit: I was also just thinking, and the idea of "not using" vanishing points is kind of absurd. Vanishing points aren't just an abstract construct we invented, like a program or something, to be able to recreate perspective on paper. Vanishing points are real! They're kinda there, whether you find em or not. Go look down a long set of railroad tracks. See the point in the distance where they vanish?

    Last edited by Lamp; September 3rd, 2010 at 01:03 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    2,364
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 887 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yes! It's called sticking photographs in a projector and tracing.



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Kamber Parrk For This Useful Post:


  6. #5
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Projecting from a plan and elevation doesn't use vanishing points. But if you don't like using vanishing points, you'd probably like that even less.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Outside Toronto
    Posts
    542
    Thanks
    276
    Thanked 349 Times in 125 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Well, there's the "fake" perspective where you measure off marks on the sides of your image to create a grid. I hate typing it up (even though I teach it). I got it from Loomis -- not sure where he got it from.

    Google turned up this okay illustration of it here.

    ~R

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to rpace For This Useful Post:


  9. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 7 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Well there's parallel projection, but that's probably not the answer you were looking for

    I'll probably have to say eyeball it to the extent that you're able and use vp's only where necessary.

    Another method is to use a 3d application (I recommend the freeware Blender) and do a quick mock-up of your scene, render and trace/paint over/whatever the resulting image. EDIT: 'Course, that's a pretty poor substitute for actually learning perspective.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,008
    Thanks
    175
    Thanked 696 Times in 292 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    Yes! It's called sticking photographs in a projector and tracing.

    Or there's Sketchup

    Or, just getting good enough with the vanishing points that you can fake it in most circumstances.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    170
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 125 Times in 70 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    On another note, when you're starting a perspective-heavy drawing, it can be helpful to just freehand it at first without worrying about perfect perspective. That way you can get down the basic idea and composition without worry. Once you're satisfied, set up the perspective grid and make corrections.

    STARTING your drawing with a perspective grid is gonna feel incredibly restrictive and limiting, especially if you only have a limited grasp on the system.

    Of course that's assuming you do have some basic grasp on how perspective works. If not then you're kinda stuck. Keep studying and thinking and you'll get it.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #10
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,649
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 5,881 Times in 2,355 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    J D Harding uses a classical approach that depends on relative angles and measuring but no formal perspective. I recommend it to my students and it is a dover book so it is cheap. 127 lessons teach you to draw objects in the landscape including buildings. Right now you can get it from hamilton books for 7 bucks plus shipping
    Hardings lessons on drawing

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #11
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Be aware that if you don't know at least the basics of how viewing distance effects perspective, setting up your camera properly in a 3D program is going to be hit-or-miss.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    1,238
    Thanks
    889
    Thanked 1,535 Times in 567 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Use vps as tools. Practice seeing with them enough so that you don't need to use them. Understanding the idea behind perspective is the real point. Practice like everything else. And it's always nice to know that you have something to check your work with in those really complex visual environments.

    Bill'sStudio

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to bcarman For This Useful Post:


Members who have read this thread: 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •