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    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology

    In my wide wanderings across many a library, bookstore and website I have accumulated a horde of interesting scraps of folktales, myths and legends, many of which make excellent inspiration fodder and are generally just good stuff, ranging from the macabre and downright vile to the humourous and the odd. I feel we might all benefit from a place to post various folktales, legends, myths and oddments of human culture.

    I'll kick off with The Hantu Penanggalan, a variation on the Vampire myth with a hint of the Chonchon (do a google), a beast taking the form of a woman by day, often stinking of vinegar. By night the head detaches, and trailing its (in some versions glowing) entrails behind it, soars off into the night to seek warm blood, often those of infants. In the morning it dries itself out in vinegar and pops back in place. The first was supposedly created when a woman praying was startled by a monkey andkicked her own head off.
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    Here's a variation on the werewolf mythology that I first came across in Neil Gaiman's Graveyard Book:

    (From Wikipedia) "A notable exception to the association of Lycanthropy and the Devil, comes from a rare and lesser known account of an 80-year-old man named Thiess. In 1692, in Jurgenburg, Livonia, Thiess testified under oath that he and other werewolves were the Hounds of God.[10] He claimed they were warriors who went down into hell to do battle with witches and demons. Their efforts ensured that the Devil and his minions did not carry off the grain from local failed crops down to hell. Thiess was steadfast in his assertions, claiming that werewolves in Germany and Russia also did battle with the devil's minions in their own versions of hell, and insisted that when werewolves died, their souls were welcomed into heaven as reward for their service. Thiess was ultimately sentenced to ten lashes for Idolatry and superstitious belief."

    Oh, and another favorite is Rawhead and Bloody-Bones. I first heard about this guy from Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things by Ted Naifeh:

    "Bloody-Bones is said to live near water (in older tellings) and under sink pipes (in newer tellings). Rawhead/Bloodybones rewards very good children, but will punish naughty children by dragging them down the drainpipes or into the water and drowning them. In addition to drowning naughty children, he is said to be able to turn them into objects such as pieces of trash or spots of jam, which are inadvertently cleaned-up and thrown out by unwitting parents. "

    http://www.monstropedia.org/index.ph...e=Bloody_Bones
    Last edited by Senira; August 24th, 2010 at 12:04 PM.

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    Those names alone could inspire endless variations on a theme. Rawhead sounds particularly vile. First heard of him in "The Haunting of Alaizabel Cray".
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    That's the coolest view of a werewolf I've ever heard. Sacred Werewolves.

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    I love Folklore, here are a few from where i grew up in Chiloé, Chile. Folklore there is based on witches mostly, and these two are the ones i remember most.

    El Trauco
    A deformed and ugly dwarf with course and swollen features, roughly dressed with a conical cap. His feet are mere stumps, his voice only grunts, he carries a stone axe or wooden club called "Pahueldún". He lives in the forest and possesses superhuman strength. With his little stone axe he can fell any tree, no matter how large or hard, in only three strokes. He walks with the aid of "Pahueldún". He is usually found seated between the trees weaving his clothes of bark.
    He likes to chase and attack women with the intention of stealing their virginity. With a stare he could impregnate woman or turn others rigid with deformed hands, arms and legs, killing them with his glance or leaving them to die within the year.

    -also as a child i would be told by friends that if you hear 3 knocks/chops at the side of your house at night it was el Trauco chopping at your house to make you come out, then he would kill you- (i remember hearing this one time while going to sleep, almost shat my pants as a kid cause i lived near the woods away from the city >.<)

    El Caleuche
    The Caleuche legend tells the story of a phantom ship that carries wizards and witches and sails along the south Pacific, appearing sporadically close to beaches during the night. When there is low tide you can distinguish in the fog something like a highly illuminated vessel with music on board, as if a party were in full swing. The myth is that those who witness this spectacle (fishermen, in general) turn into marine animals such as seals or sea lions, or are simply borne away on the Caleuche. (explained disappearances of fisherman)

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    Here are some Swedish/Scandinavian ones...

    Älvor/Elfs

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Usually found dancing at dusk or dawn on open fields. They could often be heard as tweeting birds. Where they'd been dancing the grass was be either unusually healthy or scarse which is called an elf-ring. They're usually thought to bring disease and if you watched the elves dance what seemed like hours would in reality be years. If you urinated in an elf-ring you would get a veneral disease.

    Näcken/The Neck

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    A naked guy who lives in the river and likes to play violin. The lure of the music is so strong that it calls people into the river and makes them drown. He can also turn into a yellow horse called a Beckahäst that lures children onto its back and carries them down into the river. It doesn't matter how many children are on its back because it only gets longer for each who sits on it. The Neck also offers to teach his violin play to humans. A person who's learned to play from him will be so entranced by the music he's playing that he can't stop until he looses his mind. The same goes for everyone who's dancing to the music. The only way to stop it is if someone realizes what's going on and cuts the violin strings with a knife.

    Skogsrå/Huldra

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    The skogsrå is the queen of the forest where she commands all the animals. She's very beautiful and seductive, but if you see her from behind she has a hole in her back like an old tree. She sometimes also has a cows or a foxes tail. It's strictly forbidden to talk about her tail unless done very politely. She likes to seduce men who wander in the forest, and men who sleeps with her has their souls taken from them. Sometimes she could blow down the pipe of a gun making it never miss its target. Sometimes she would marry a man, but her beauty would fade if she went into a church. If she married a christian man she would loose her unhuman attributes and they would live out their lives like a normal couple, however if he treated her badly she would remind him of her strength by straightening a horse shoe with her bare hands while its still glowing hot from the forge for example.

    Other variations include the sjörå (lakes) and the bergsrå (mountains).

    Troll

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    The trolls live in the forest and often in caves. Their dwellings are usually full of gold. Sometimes they would kidnap human children and replace them with their own because they want a prettier child. You could remedy this by either threatening to kill the child or baptising it. A person, especially women, could get bergtagen and taken to the trolls dwelling. When they were later released they had lost their minds. (Probably an explanation for psychological disorders.) Trolls were afraid of Thor's hammer, church bells and steel which is why it was a good idea to carry a knife when you went into the trolls forest. They also turn to stone when exposed to sunlight.
    Last edited by tobbA; August 24th, 2010 at 02:34 PM.
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  11. #7
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    Only four posts and I'm already loving this thread. There are some pretty awesome CHOW & COW candidates in here.

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    Bought this book on Norse Mythology from Amazon and its GODDAMN AWESOME

    I massively reccommend it. If you want a taster, you should indulge in the wiki page here.

    Heres a sample to show you what I'm talking about:
    In Norse mythology there are 'nine worlds' (níu heimar), that many scholars summarize as follows:

    Midgard, world of average human experience
    Álfheimr, world of the Álfar (elves).
    Svartálfaheim, world of the Svartálfar (black elves)
    Vanaheimr, world of the Vanir
    Muspellheim, world of fire
    Jötunheimr, world of the jötnar
    Niflheim, world of ice
    Asgard, world of the Æsir
    Hel, world of the Niðavellir, netherworld.
    Each world also had significant places within. Valhalla is Odin's hall located in Asgard. It was also home of the Einherjar, who were the souls of the greatest warriors. These warriors were selected by the Valkyries. The Einherjar would help defend the gods during Ragnarok.

    These worlds are connected by Yggdrasil, the world tree, a giant tree with Asgard at its top. Chewing at its roots in Niflheim is Nidhogg, a ferocious serpent or dragon. Asgard can also be reached by Bifrost, a rainbow bridge guarded by Heimdall, a god who can see and hear a thousand miles
    This is the stuff that inspired a kazillion RPGs and novels, including WoW and Lord of the Rings. Needless to say, its got me hooked! Its just utterly badass and epic A must-research.

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    This is the thread.

    Hitotsume-kozō
    Hitotsume-kozō are relatively harmless creatures, content to run about frightening human beings or telling loud people to be quiet (they enjoy silence). However, many people consider an encounter with a one-eyed goblin to be a bad omen. For this reason, the superstitious often leave bamboo baskets in front of their houses, as these are reputed to repel the creatures. A reason for this may be that, in seeing the basket's many holes, the hitotsume-kozō will see the basket as having many eyes, and run away jealous and ashamed at only having one.
    Folklore and Mythology Thread

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    Glad to see all involved are loving the thread.
    Bakeneko
    On occasion, after ten years of life, a housecat may experience a strange metamorphosis into the Bakeneko. Its legs will straighten, allowing it to stand erect as does a man, and then its tail will split into two. It will gain a plethora of magical abilities including shapeshifting, which it will often use to take vengeance on the master who imprisoned it.

    Black Shuck
    There a thousand variants on the "Grim Hound" myth, including the Barghest and the Gwyllig, but a favourite of mine has always been the Black Shuck, for that rather intriguing name. It appears as a phantom dog, with blazing emerald eyes, and wanders the moors. To see it is to be doomed.

    Spring Heeled Jack
    The being called Spring Heeled Jack has been sighted frequently in and around London as recently as 1986. It may be a devil, a man or a spirit of some sort. Supposedly Jack appears as a thin black figure, often a gentleman in top hat, with devilish or vampiric features. He may belch blue fire, or leap ridiculous distances, or tell the future to his unwary witnesses.
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    Tikbalang
    An untrusting skittishness is prevalent among the communites surrounding the mountainous regions of the King Filipinas archipelago. The skewed, furtive glances exchanged when family members ask to be accompanied somewhere are a habit formed from fear of the Tikbalang. Often eerily mimicking the appearance of victims' relatives, this forest spirit will lead lone people out to the heavily wooded depths of the mountain ranges, occasionally breaking the increasingly uncomfortable silence with short bursts of reassurement, and stilted gratitude for the assistance. The suddenly pungent aroma of tobacco and drunken swaying motion adopted by the false family member is noticed before their face blurs into something that resembles more that of a horse's than a human's. Delirious town folk who have stumbled their way into town after long absences tell of how this apparation pushed and slapped them, often knocking them over and not allowing them to right themselves; all the while shaking with nervous, childish giggling. People say that the cessation of resistance or protest will suddenly lead a victim to find themselves alone in the woods, plunged into darkness; the sun long set. The path home, recalled by the few who return after a disappearance, is hampered by a severe sense of disorientation and a forest that seems to curl in on itself repeatedly.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

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    The appearance of the Tikbalang as detailed above.. the swaying, and the warping of the face, followed by the arrival.. its like some nightmarish fever dream. And i've had my share.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuckyDevil View Post
    -also as a child i would be told by friends that if you hear 3 knocks/chops at the side of your house at night it was el Trauco chopping at your house to make you come out, then he would kill you- (i remember hearing this one time while going to sleep, almost shat my pants as a kid cause i lived near the woods away from the city >.<)
    Well that's interesting. He will knock three times, huh? The devil's meant to knock three times too, as is Death, and ghosts, thinking about it.

    Wonder where that stems from. Hrm.

    I've got a bunch of great characters to post, but too late tonight, I'll bookmark this for tomorrow. Great stuff guys.


    "I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat." - Winston Churchill

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    I would like to hike to the North Pole. I have a shoe and a ham sandwich. What do I do next?

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    Awesome idea for a thread. I think I'm going to have to subscribe. Here's some more Japanese folklore entries:


    Kitsune - forest spirits associated with Inari Okami, the Japanese god of nature. It appears as a fox, it glows bright like a lightbulb, has nine tails and can shapeshift into humans.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology Thread









    Tengu - demons that have a number of shapes ranging between a large, monstrous bird and a wholly anthropomorphized being, often with a red face or an unusually large or long nose.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology Thread










    Kasha - sky demons that steal and feed on corpses.


    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology Thread











    Oni - Basically the Japanese version of trolls. Demons with sharp claws, wild hair, two long horns and two huge fangs.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology Thread
    Last edited by biglu; August 26th, 2010 at 02:32 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Droid View Post
    Well that's interesting. He will knock three times, huh? The devil's meant to knock three times too, as is Death, and ghosts, thinking about it.

    Wonder where that stems from. Hrm.

    I've got a bunch of great characters to post, but too late tonight, I'll bookmark this for tomorrow. Great stuff guys.

    That reminds me of an old favorite of mine, Bloody Mary. My friends and I spent many a sleepover goading each other into summoning her. I remember one night after we did the "ritual" we heard scratching on the roof and were too scared to go to sleep for hours.

    "One of the more common ways participants attempt to make her appear is to stand before a mirror in the dark (usually in a bathroom) and repeat her name three times, though there are many variations including chanting a hundred times, chanting at midnight, spinning around, rubbing one's eyes, running the water, or chanting her name thirteen times with a lit candle. In some versions of the legend, the summoner must say, "Bloody Mary, I killed your baby." In these variants, Bloody Mary is often believed to be the spirit of a young mother whose baby was stolen from her, making her mad in grief, eventually committing suicide. In stories where Mary is supposed to have been wrongly accused of killing her children, the querent might say "I believe in Mary Worth." This is similar to another game involving the summoning of the Bell Witch in a mirror at midnight. The game is often a test of courage and bravery, as it is said that if Bloody Mary is summoned, she would proceed to kill the summoner in an extremely violent way, such as ripping their face off, scratching their eyes out, cutting their head off, driving them insane, bringing them into the mirror with her or scratching their neck, causing serious injury or death. Some think if she doesn't kill the one who had summoned her then she will haunt them for the rest of their life."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody_Mary_%28folklore%29

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    Droid - Hmm it might be a european catholic influence since spaniards discovered chile and had cultural influences to the natives there. More on chilean myths http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chilean_mythology

    Legend of how the island of Chiloe was formed
    The Trentren Vilu is the god of Earth, and is a generous spirit and protecter of all earth's life. Caicai Vilu is the god of Water and the origin of all that inhabits it, and rules the seas.
    According to this myth, thousands of years ago, what is now the Chiloé Province was once one contiguous landmass with continental Chile. One day a monstrous serpent appeared and inundated the lowlands, valleys, and mountains, submerging all the flora and fauna. Without delay, Trentren Vilu appeared to start a confrontation with his enemy, elevating the land and protecting it from disaster. The battle persisted a long time. Trentren Vilu reached a costly victory, he won the battle, but was unable to restore the land to its primeval state leaving it in the dismembered form it still has today.
    At the end of the hostilities, Caicai Vilu left as representative and owner of all the seas, the king Millalobo (Millalonco), who was conceived during the invasion when a beautiful woman fell in love with a sea lion.
    This legend describes the new region formed of water and earth and delineates the marine life style of Chiloé.

    Serina you just reminded me of one from when i was a kid.

    You would go out in an empty field in the middle of night when the moon was not present. (so it would be really really dark) and you would have a small mirror that you would stare without blinking or turning away from it. It is said that eventually you will see the face of a demon with glowing red eyes, and supposedly was not safe once he appeared.

    Brujos (witches/sorcerers)
    The Witches of Chiloé ("Brujo de Chiloé" or "Brujo chilote" in the Spanish language) are semi-mythical characters in Chilote mythology and folklore who are considered very powerful warlocks and sorcerers. The witchcraft of the Chiloé Archipelago has been practiced for ages and ages, still a widespread belief among the population of the Chiloé, in Chile.
    When the Spanish arrived in this land of huilliches (Mapudungun means "southern people"), the kalkus and Machis had already been long established. In many cases when a Machi cured some incurable disease, their fame spread to far distant places. Also when a kalku from malevolent clans cast spells so intense that it drove more than one enemy mad no other doctor could help apart from members of a friendly tribe.
    In the eighteenth century, José de Moraleda, wished to prove his proficiency to these huilliches and establish that he was the most formidable sorcerer in the world. The locals didn't believe him and called upon the Machi Chilpilla, who lived in Quetalco, to confront this intruder to their lands. Moraleda was defeated and in recognition of this offered the Machi an enormous book of ancient witchcraft around the world. Further, Moraleda wrote that the natives of Chiloé were not as deplorable as he had believed and, in fact, were even better than some Chileans. This being the origin story of the "Witches of Chiloé."
    Today throughout the archipelago of Chiloé there are Machis from who cure diseases which many doctors have considered untreatable, along with incurable misfortune from certain curses inflicted by "Witches of Chiloé" of some black sect on persons who were defenseless from such spells.

    Theres tons more of myths from my home country Chile but i don't want to make walls of texts . I would love to hear more stuff from different countries, from the known and not so well known countries!

    Keep them coming these are awesome

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    Mythology

    Peryton are carnivorous winged deer whose shadows take the form of men

    Kelpie: A folklore from Ireland and Scotland, kelpie are water horses who hunt marshes for people to drag beneath the water. The most common way I've heard them described were beautiful black horses with marsh weeds in their mane and tail. The skin of the kelpie would act like glue, trapping the people tricked into mounting the horse. After that the kelpie would dive beneath the waters and drown their prey. As a bonus, one of my favorite Draper paintings is titled Kelpie ^^

    Sirin: Originating in Russia and obviously drawing some from the Grecian sirens, sirin are birds with female faces. While not malicious by nature, their songs were so consuming to normal people that it could cause them to become obsessively enthralled. And they are in this cool painting

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    THIS THREAD IS SO AWESOME! Unfortunately, I have nothing to contribute.

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    Jacob, I think your interview with Android has pretty much covered you for contributions to the forum.
    Otherwise, I think the signifigance of three (3 knocks, mother maiden crone, 666, triskelion, Holy Trinity, Third Eye etc.) might be worth investigating. Another interesting tidbit is the Varcolac or Valkolak, a sort of hybrid myth which in some versions is a werewolf and in others a vampire. Supposedly those killed at crossroads may rise into cyclopean fanged beings that upon Samhain/Hallows Eve/Walpurgisnacht devour the moon and the sun. I think one featured in a Hellboy story.

    Biglu - that smorgasbord of traditional japanese art is juicy stuff
    CRITIQUE AS YOU WOULD BE CRITIQUED
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    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=200044 <- Sketchbook - filled with unhappy things.

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    great thread !

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    One of the best threads on CA so far, and it's only one page! I am obsessed about mythology and have read a lot about it, so I must contribute some when I get time on my hands.
    "I wish to paint in such a manner as if I were photographing dreams" - Zdzislaw Beksinski
    My Happy Little Sketchbook, please check it out and help me get better!

    My TUMBLR!

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    naga, protectors, often water spirits that are found all over thailand, these were outside a very old decrepit temple in the north.

    they stem from everything from indian culture to local snake cults, having been integrated into buddhist mythology rather than beeing forced out, and from what i can read they often have the myth of beeing helpful dragons associated with rivers and waters, tunneling out new rivers, staying behind and protecting temples and buddhism etc. rainbows are in some places considered to be the heads of these big water snakes.

    at least, thats what ive read, I just had these pics lying around from a trip i took years ago, the short version i got while i was there was that they were protectors.

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    Nice, mimer. I think some of the best Hindu & Buddhist sculptures are Nāga.


    Folklore and Mythology Thread

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    Orias (also spelled Oriax) is a Great Marquis of Hell, and has thirty legions of demons under his command. He knows and teaches the virtues of the stars and the mansions of the planets (the influence of each planet depending on the astrological sign in which it is in a specific moment and the influence of that sign on an individual depending on how the zodiac was configured at the moment of his/her birth or at the moment of asking a question to the astrologist); he also gives dignities, prelacies, and the favour of friends and foes, and can metamorphose a man into any shape.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread


    Seraphim (Heb. ששׂרפים, Seraphim, sing. ששׂרף, Seraph, Lat. seraph[us], pl. seraphi[m], Gr. Σεραφείμ) are a class of celestial beings in Judaism and Christianity. Literally "burning ones", the word is normally a synonym for snakes when used in the Hebrew bible, but they are mentioned in the Book of Isaiah as fiery six-winged beings attending on God. They appear again as celestial beings in an influential Hellenistic work, the Book of Enoch, and a little later in the Book of Revelation. They occupy the fifth of ten ranks of the hierarchy of angels in medieval and modern Judaism, and the highest rank in the Christian angelic hierarchy.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Folklore and Mythology Thread


    Flauros is a strong Great Duke of Hell, having thirty-six (twenty according to Pseudomonarchia Daemonum) legions of demons under his rule.

    He gives true answers of all things past, present and future, but he must be first commanded to enter a magic triangle for if not he will lie, deceive the conjurer, and beguile him in other business. But if he enters the triangle he will answer truly, and gladly speak about divinity, the creation of the world, himself, and other fallen angels. He can also destroy all the conjurer's enemies by burning them up. If the magician requests it, he will not suffer temptations from any spirit or in any form.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

  36. #25
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    Who remembers Darby O' Gill and the Little People?

    Cóiste Bodhar
    The coach-a-bower is based in Irish folklore. It is also called the Death Coach or Coshta- Bower. It is said to be a very large black coach that is pulled by six (6) black horses. Depending on the version you read the horses are sometimes headless and sometimes not. The driver of this death coach is said to be the Dullahan. "Dullahans are headless. Although the dullahan has no head upon its shoulders, he carries it with him, either on the saddle-brow of his horse or upraised in his right hand. The head is the colour and texture of stale dough or mouldy cheese, and quite smooth. A hideous, idiotic grin splits the face from ear to ear, and the eyes, which are small and black, dart about like malignant flies. The entire head glows with the phosphoresence of decaying matter and the creature may use it as a lantern to guide its way along the darkened laneways of the Irish countryside. Wherever the dullahan stops, a mortal dies."
    http://www.pararesearchers.org/Ghost...achabower.html

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Another tale comes from my mother. She spent her childhood fearing the Heartman, who appeared in the night to hack up naughty children with his machete. I wish I could find more about him, but Barbadian folklore is hard to dig up online.

  37. #26
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    Oi, is this thread made of awsomesauce or what? ^_^

    So, anyways, Slavic mythology is very similar to other European mythologies (due to cultural influences and the fact we had Celts, Sacksons and other tribes marching through this area), so we had our own versions of pagan gods, deities and creatures (fairies, elves, dragons, giants, dwarfs and other), with slight modifications. For instance, dragons were`t always evil and mean monsters out to get the fairest of them all - some of them were actually very wise, almost like scholars,, and people sometimes turned to them for help or advice. Other example are elves/fairies - beautiful young maidens who would dance out in the fields during a full moon, and leaving crop circles. However, these fairies had goat/donkey hoofs well concealed beneath their long robes. They also had very long hair (that stank! But if they caught you, you were never allowed to say that out loud, or they would punish you), and if one managed to untangle it without breaking a single strand, one would be rewarded with gold. They also had favorites among humans(almost always young women) who were called vilenice - they would be taught in the ways of nature, and how to use different herbs to heal wounds and diseases.

    One of weirder creatures is something called tenac - it`s usually described as a blob, a sack filled with oil that has tiny teeth and oozes black liquid. Very peculiar. And very, very mean.

    One of the most famous myths (well, actually legends, but whatevs) is the one of Black Queen, based on a true historical figure, Barbara Celjska. Legend says she was a beautiful young woman who always wore black, and had a raven as a pet who would, if she wanted to, fly amongst peasants and rip their eyes out. During the Turkish invasion enemy troops came dangerously close to Medvedgrad (her city/citadel/castle), and with no way out in sight, she decided to make a pact with the devil himself. She shouted "Strike them Devil, and I`ll give you my city!" Nothing happened. She shouted again "Strike them Devil, and I`ll give you my city and all my treasures". Still no response. And then, in utter despair, she shouted "Strike them Devil, and I`ll give you my city, my treasures and myself!" At that moment a storm broke from nowhere and lightnings destroyed every single Turkish soldier in the valley. The threat was over. But, realizing what she has done, she tried to bribe the devil and redeem her soul back. The Devil was so angry at her for trying to fool him with such cheap tricks, he cursed her soul to eternal damnation - she will spend the rest of eternity in form of a snake hidden deep withing the caves of the mountain, guarding all her precious gold. And it will only take a strong, brave and pure harted man willing to go through horrible temptations to set her free. And so now, she is still there, somewhere. Waiting and hoping.


    Man, I`m so glad i took that "Croatian mythology" class back in the day.
    Last edited by PxelSlayer; August 26th, 2010 at 11:44 PM.

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    I'd love to take the time to thank every individual who posts here with marvellous marvellousness, but I only have so many days. IN their place, thanks to Biglu and Mimer for those astonishing photos. The intricacy and ostentatious splendour of Thai temples always catches me off guard. Fantastic. Also thanks to Crossmirage for the first appearance of Goetic demons (and a class of angel!) which have always had a special fascination for me. Those depictions are rather lovely as well, would you mind terribly linking their point of origin?

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    The Golem appears in a multitude of tangled folktales in many variant forms, plodding his way through our collective consciousness with his feet of clay. His origin can be traced to the tlae of Rabbi Loew and the Jewish community of Prague, which sought protection from anti-semites with the aid of the creature. Fashioned from thick clay (and in some stories, a drop or two of blood), baked to harden and with both the Hebrew word for truth (Emet) set upon his brow and a scroll of directions in his head, he was created to defend the Jews everywhere by the good Mr.Loew, and supposedly still watches over them.
    CRITIQUE AS YOU WOULD BE CRITIQUED
    http://conceptart.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=59
    THE ABOVE LINK IS ALL YOU NEED

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=200044 <- Sketchbook - filled with unhappy things.

  39. #28
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    @Mordus: They're by artist Kazuma Kaneko, who is best known for his art in the Megami Tensei series of games. It's basically Mythologymon and the earliest known example of the -mon concept in video gaming, so those of you who enjoy mythology might want to check it out.

    In demonology, Malthus (also Halphas, Malthas, or Malthous) is an Earl of Hell, commanding 26 legions of demons, who is said to have a rough voice when speaking. He is often depicted in the shape of a stork.

    Malthus builds towers and fills them with ammunition and weapons, an armorer of sorts. He is also said to send his legions into battle, or to places designated by higher commanding demons.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    In demonology, Bifrons is a demon, Earl of Hell, with six legions of demons (twenty-six for other authors) under his command. He teaches sciences and arts, the virtues of the gems and woods, herbs, and changes corpses from their original grave into other places, sometimes putting magick lights on the graves that seem candles. He appears as a monster, but then changes his shape into that of a man.

    The origin of the name is the Roman god Janus.

    Other spellings: Bifrovs, Bifröus

    Folklore and Mythology Thread


    In Buddhism, Māra is the demon who tempted Gautama Buddha by trying to seduce him with the vision of beautiful women who, in various legends, are often said to be Mara's daughters. In Buddhist cosmology, Mara personifies unskillfulness, the "death" of the spiritual life. He is a tempter, distracting humans from practicing the spiritual life by making the mundane alluring or the negative seem positive.

    The early Buddhists, however, rather than seeing Mara as a demonic, virtually all-powerful Lord of Evil, regarded him as more of a nuisance. Many episodes concerning his interactions with the Buddha have a decidedly humorous air to them.

    Early Buddhism acknowledged both a literal and "psychological" interpretation of Mara. Mara is described both as an entity having a literal existence, just as the various deities of the Vedic pantheon are shown existing around the Buddha, and also is described as a primarily psychological force - a metaphor for various processes of doubt and temptation that obstruct spiritual practice.

    Folklore and Mythology Thread
    Folklore and Mythology Thread
    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Yes, that's a dick monster on a chariot.
    Last edited by crossmirage; August 27th, 2010 at 06:20 AM.

  40. #29
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    Sleipnir - The god, Loki, shapeshifted into a mare to distract a troublesome builder's stallion, Svaðilfari, and ended up having relations with it. Quite a while later, he gives birth to Sleipnir, the eight legged grey horse, whom he gives to Odin as a gift and is "the best horse among gods and men."
    He is sometimes ridden to the location of Hel.
    Folklore and Mythology Thread


    Jörmungandr - Another of Loki's offspring, Jörmungandr is also known as the World Serpent or the Midgard Serpent and is the arch enemy of Thor. Odin tossed the serpent out into the great ocean that encircles Midgard. The serpent grew so large that he was able to surround the Earth and grasp his own tail. When he lets go the world will end.
    Folklore and Mythology Thread

    Fenrir - Brother of Jörmungandr, Fenrir is a monstrous wolf. Prophecies fortold him to be the one to kill Odin. Hearing this and seeing his rapid growth, the Gods bound him. At Ragnarok, he will be free to fulfill his prophecy.
    Folklore and Mythology Thread

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    Lightbulb Cool thread

    I think you should take a look at ForgottenBooks.org - I've found a few interesting tales there, and it's an useful reference website -

    http://www.forgottenbooks.org/other/folklore_mythology


    The Black Queen sounds like an interesting figure. Right now I'm on the lookout for some interesting Persian & Russian myths. I have found Norse myths to be rich in interesting visual imagery. So far I like the Persian fairytale of Simorgh, benevolent, mythical flying creature, which is like a peacock with the head of a dog and the claws of a lion. I read it here

    http://www.theosophy-nw.org/theosnw/...st/mi-homa.htm


    In Welsh myth, Blodeuwedd was a woman made by a magician out of flowers (Blodyn means 'flower' in the Welsh language). She is made to be with one called Lleu, and doesn't seem to have any choice in the matter. She falls in love with another man Gronw Pebr, and plots to kill Lleu. Her actions reflect the nature& character of her maker, who was hardly a decent person himself. This myth comes from the Mabinogion, which is a collection of Welsh myths that date from the dark ages, or possibly earlier. I haven't done a lot of in-depth reading into all the myths, but I think they are told from a Christian perspective, where independent thought & action was frowned on in women, and submission & chastity were virtues.

    Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a lesser known Arthurian legend. The Green knight (who some believe is the Green Man), challenged anyone in Arthur's court to cut off his head with his axe, so long as he would come back in a year's time and offer himself to recieve the same blow. Gawain was the only one who would do it, and so cut off the Green knight's head. To everyone's amazement, the Green Knight stood up and calmly picked up his head, and told Gawain to meet him at a green chapel in a year's time.
    Last edited by TerianArkwith; August 28th, 2010 at 07:59 PM.

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