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  1. #1
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    Next best thing to life drawing classes?

    Hi,

    in my last Critique Center Thread, I was strongly recommended to take life drawing classes. It's not the first time people told me that. However, in my city, there will be no such thing until October, and I'll have plenty of time till October. In my usual style of work, I use lots of photo references and also like to learn from books (Vilppu, Bridgman, ...).

    I guess there is no adequate substitute for a nude life drawing class. But what is the next best thing?

    Maybe some 3D Computer software likeVirtual Figure Drawing Studio or something better?

    Maybe recorded figure drawing sessions or some kind of video material?

    What would you recommend?

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  3. #2
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    Go out and draw real people on the street, in shopping malls, in parks, and so on. Believe me, your gestures will get WAY better in a hurry, as will your quick sketching and overall feel for the human figure (or animal figure, if you do the same with pets and such). Combine that with friends/family sitting to watch movies and whatnot, basic shape practice and some degree of study, you've got a pretty powerful combination.

    Nude people are really good for a lot of things (heh), but they're not the only life drawing out there.

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    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
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  5. #3
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    Just drawing random people in the public? That's a great idea, I'll love to try!

    I have always been wondering why I started drawing like three years ago. Your reply made me understand why! Because back then, I must have sensed subconsciously that drawing from life in public must be the ultimate way of approaching hot chicks! "Hey there, would you mind walking more slowly, please? What's your name?" Why didn't I think of that earlier?! ;-)

    OK, back to serious: Some of the sketches would be very rough and quick, wouldn't they? Especially when people move or walk it seems like a tough exercise?!

    I am also a little afraid that I'll have a very hard time with architecture and wildlife because so far, I have been focussing on figure drawing entirely.

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    http://www.artmodelbook.com/figure-d...-directory.htm

    Try this database. Maybe you can find a life drawing group nearby.

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    Quote Originally Posted by quaternion View Post
    I guess there is no adequate substitute for a nude life drawing class. But what is the next best thing?
    If you have a mirror, you have a life drawing model.

    As the ego shrinks, so the spirit expands.
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  9. #6
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    If you don't feel comfortable drawing in public or don't have access to classes yet you can purchase a plaster statue or bust. Its the next best thing to something live and better than photos because its three dimensional.

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  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by quaternion View Post
    OK, back to serious: Some of the sketches would be very rough and quick, wouldn't they? Especially when people move or walk it seems like a tough exercise?!

    I am also a little afraid that I'll have a very hard time with architecture and wildlife because so far, I have been focussing on figure drawing entirely.
    Most are very rough and quick. Results tend to be along these lines, although I've only been at it for a few weeks and I'm concentrating on trying to capture motion. People standing in lineups, sitting and drinking coffee, waiting for lights, and so on, you have a bit more time to get it all down. You can always refine it later.

    As to architecture, same deal really. Besides which, the more you draw and the more you learn forms and structure, the better you get at drawing in general. So when you're out, you see a cool house, or a street, or an alley, or garbage can or whatever, do a quick thumbnail. It doesn't have to be neat, it just has to get the idea down on paper. You can do more with it later, when you've got more time.

    The Nezumi Works Sketchbook - Now in progress

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    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
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