Art: landscape and architecture...?

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  1. #1
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    landscape and architecture...?

    not sure if anyone will relate to this. i've found a prodominate weakness in my work, one that i feel is essential in my personal opinion....to both artistic ability and self worth. i find myself at times avoiding landscapes in my work, my own fault, but it's as if i just can't find an order for myself to acheive good practice.

    there isn't much where i live to draw from life, but say a few trees and such. and i'm not to sure on the benefits of drawing scenery from photos. i understand perspective on a level satisfying to myself, and architecture definately comes in second to my weakness with greenery and scapes.

    basicly, i just need some help on where, and maybe how to start studying to improve on the topic. i'm not looking for tutorials, nor demos, rather a practice schedule, method, suggestions on good resources/references to draw from...may it be life or photo. maybe a bit of "homework" typed advice or such.

    thanks for any help.

    Last edited by hed|lamb; August 7th, 2002 at 02:30 AM.
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  3. #2
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    well, being that real life is the greatest teacher, the next best would probably be photo. drawing from photo can still be very useful, but the obvious drawback to it is that any magic that goes on inbetween your eyes seeing the subject, and converting that into image through your body to the page is lost. one thing that will help, pick up a bunch of national geographics. i have like 30 of em and theyre great to look through for beautiful scenery. you can pick up a years issues or so of them on ebay for like 15 bucks. or do like me, ask a librarian if theyre giving any away. most libraries have millions of em.

    and the best advice ever: just keep drawing. its great that you can recognize your weaknesses, the next step is doing something about them, namely, drawing. as for method... i think that each person will learn his drawing skills in different ways... but when i want to try something new i look at good examples of my interest... old master works, newer works, basically anything with credibility that has to do with what i want to learn. i study that work, read about it, do what i need to do, then take what i learned and try to apply it.

    good luck man
    chris

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  4. #3
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    Heh, I can relate to this. Not much but boring bushy forest and open sky here. Then winter for 9 months. Heh.

    National Geographic is a great source, as Chris said. I have a subscription which is effin expensive, but worth it. Dont copy the photos though, use them. Dont copy the shapes, instead construct the forms with perspective. You'll get a lot more out of using photographs if you build whats in them rather than copy them.

    Also dont be afraid to use your imagination. This is something I'm going to be trying soon, and thats to take a series of photographs and try to build some sort of environment out of ideas from them. Maybe have a photo of a cool looking bridge, and a photo of some ruins and a nice landscape, and put your own spin on it.

    You could go a step further even and make your outside environment interesting. Go outside and start drawing your back yard for instance, only instead of drawing everything you see, put something interesting in it like an alien space craft with aliens invading your house or something, eheh.

    If you just want to practice drawing outdoors, draw your house, apartment, or cardboard box, whatever you call home. Draw it from different angles at different times of the day.

    These are just a few ideas I have. I cant say I've really tried any of them as I'm still working on getting basic form down and understood, so if you try any of these ideas let me know how it went!

    - loken
    jtriska @ mcleodusa.net
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  5. #4
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    thanks chris, lots. i think i have tons of old national geographics at my brother's house, will have to pick them up. the main goal here i guess is to just dig in and start drawing.

    hehe...loken, thanks for the suggestions, very nice ideas man. hmm....never thought we'd bump heads here. =)

    thinking back, i believe my main problem has not actaully been me avoiding the subject, but moreover ignoring it. i seem to have done lots of character and portrait work, but never found a "need" for landscapes....but now after seeing the works of other artists that i enjoy...i realize i will not be happy with myself until i can say i'm completely comfortable with landscapes also. sort of an accomplishment issue i guess.

    anyhow, thanks again.

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