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Thread: Quick face

  1. #1
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    Quick face

    except it didn't go all that quick :o I meant for it to be but it took a while to get the colors right.

    I did this study in order to try and learn color theory better - so hard damnit.

    oh well

    Quick face

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    I don't know what "color theory" means, but if you're trying to learn about light and color, I think you're off to a good start. I say I think because I don't know to what extent the reference came up with the colors for you. Have you produced anything else in this effort?

    If you want to really push the subject, try rendering this same portrait in completely different colors, or in a completely different lighting situation. By that I mean a) try making green skin, blue eyes, etc., or b) keep the local color of the objects "realistic" (white eyes, red lips, etc.) but change the color of the light (make it green, or yellow, or red, etc.). Also try adding a secondary light, or even two, but still just use the same reference shot.

    One hint, the color white reflects all the colors of the spectrum, so if there is an object in your picture whose local color is white (i.e. the eyes) then the color you render it in your picture tells a lot about the color of the light illuminating the scene.

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    Originally posted by Chris Beatrice
    I don't know what "color theory" means, but if you're trying to learn about light and color, I think you're off to a good start. I say I think because I don't know to what extent the reference came up with the colors for you. Have you produced anything else in this effort?

    If you want to really push the subject, try rendering this same portrait in completely different colors, or in a completely different lighting situation. By that I mean a) try making green skin, blue eyes, etc., or b) keep the local color of the objects "realistic" (white eyes, red lips, etc.) but change the color of the light (make it green, or yellow, or red, etc.). Also try adding a secondary light, or even two, but still just use the same reference shot.

    One hint, the color white reflects all the colors of the spectrum, so if there is an object in your picture whose local color is white (i.e. the eyes) then the color you render it in your picture tells a lot about the color of the light illuminating the scene.
    Wow, thanks for the awesome advice! i wasn't expecting any good CC except "yah.. looks ok" or something. but you were very ehlpful

    What i mean by "color theory" is just trying to build skins using 3 or 4 values as opposed to the old way i used to do it before i was knowledgable. the old way was just using hte color picker and picking hues from the image and slapping them on there. now im trying to actually "build" skin. its so ahrd though :-/ even towards the end of this drawing i was like ahhhh crap this sucks - so i just started using random colors isntead of trying to match values.

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