More realisticness in my drawings?

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  1. #1
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    More realisticness in my drawings?

    I recently completed a few digital painting/illustrations (view them at clarks-creations.deviantart.com) and they lack the realistic touch the most professionals get... How can I achieve this? I really need help. A lot of people I asked said I need to start sketching things I see around me which I will.. Any other advice?

    Last edited by AxFROWNYxFACE; August 20th, 2010 at 06:32 PM.
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  3. #2
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    Go back to basics and learn to render simple forms like cubes, spheres, cones use a single light source and set them up and work from life. You will never learn to render well until you understand how light falls across a form. So start simple until people say what you are doing looks real. You can use a coffee cup a bowl an egg or an apple but keep it simple and work from life.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Go back to basics and learn to render simple forms like cubes, spheres, cones use a single light source and set them up and work from life. You will never learn to render well until you understand how light falls across a form. So start simple until people say what you are doing looks real. You can use a coffee cup a bowl an egg or an apple but keep it simple and work from life.


    thanks a bunch man! I have started a sketch book thread, not the best but check it out! http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=192765.

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    i agree with dpaint. While trying to achieve a more realistic approach myself, I have found that it actually has little to do with polishing and rendering extreme detail and more with understanding the basics. The solution really is to start simple.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JJacks View Post
    i agree with dpaint. While trying to achieve a more realistic approach myself, I have found that it actually has little to do with polishing and rendering extreme detail and more with understanding the basics. The solution really is to start simple.
    I lack a good foundation the more I think about it. But understanding the basics as in what? Mind elaborating?

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    Line, shape, value and using it to create volume. Things like that. Keep it in black and white for a while. Color would probably complicate things at this point in your studies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JJacks View Post
    i agree with dpaint. While trying to achieve a more realistic approach myself, I have found that it actually has little to do with polishing and rendering extreme detail and more with understanding the basics. The solution really is to start simple.
    One of the most striking things about well-done realistic art is just how LITTLE detail it often contains. One of the tricks that a good artist knows is how to give the impression of a lot of detail without actually putting in all that detail.

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    realisticness.... "realism, more realism"

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    Looking through your sketch book, there's a few problems. First of all, if you want to draw faces and figures, get some anatomy and start learning about anatomy and the planar structure of the humany body. That won't do you TOO much good, though, until you have a better understanding of how to solve the bigger drawing "problems," namely how to render FORM, three dimensionally. It's like you're trying to pound in a nail but you don't have a hammer, and maybe you don't even know that a hammer exists, if you follow the analogy. So you carry on trying to pound in the nail with your forehead and all you get in the end is a headache.

    So basically, you need some better "tools" in your drawing toolbox. And I'm talking about tools of understanding, not just new types of pencils or brushes. If I could suggest a starting point, go get "Successful Drawing" and "Creative Illustration" by Andrew Loomis. They are available free as PDFs, I believe, and shouldn't be all that hard to find with a google search or two. Sit down and READ them. Don't just look at the pictures and think you're going to get much out of it. You gotta put in the work. Read the books. I promise you won't regret it. Years back, Loomis really opened my eyes up to a lot of fundamental drawing principles that I wasn't finding anywhere else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AxFROWNYxFACE View Post
    I lack a good foundation the more I think about it. But understanding the basics as in what? Mind elaborating?
    Among other things, the basic principles of observing and drawing what you observe... You seem to be still thinking in terms of "symbols" a lot, you might benefit from reading "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain" by Betty Edwards. It's good for getting you past the stage where you're stuck on symbols and teaches you to start observing.

    (Though you'll probably want to supplement this with other books, especially as you progress.)

    Learning basic anatomy and basic perspective would be good, too. But for general drawing exercises, it might be easiest to start off with simple still life subjects (from life, using real objects. Simple objects to start with.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lamp View Post
    Looking through your sketch book, there's a few problems. First of all, if you want to draw faces and figures, get some anatomy and start learning about anatomy and the planar structure of the humany body. That won't do you TOO much good, though, until you have a better understanding of how to solve the bigger drawing "problems," namely how to render FORM, three dimensionally. It's like you're trying to pound in a nail but you don't have a hammer, and maybe you don't even know that a hammer exists, if you follow the analogy. So you carry on trying to pound in the nail with your forehead and all you get in the end is a headache.

    So basically, you need some better "tools" in your drawing toolbox. And I'm talking about tools of understanding, not just new types of pencils or brushes. If I could suggest a starting point, go get "Successful Drawing" and "Creative Illustration" by Andrew Loomis. They are available free as PDFs, I believe, and shouldn't be all that hard to find with a google search or two. Sit down and READ them. Don't just look at the pictures and think you're going to get much out of it. You gotta put in the work. Read the books. I promise you won't regret it. Years back, Loomis really opened my eyes up to a lot of fundamental drawing principles that I wasn't finding anywhere else.
    I downloaded the two pdfs and I will read them =D say some of his work he is a real genius. I will definatly start looking at his stuff... Hopefully by the time I graduate from highschool I am the best I can be. =D.

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  17. #12
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    Hopefully by the time I graduate from highschool I am the best I can be. =D.
    I'd say, hopefully you're not. You should keep improving until the end of time.

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

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  18. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJacks View Post
    Line, shape, value and using it to create volume. Things like that. Keep it in black and white for a while. Color would probably complicate things at this point in your studies.
    heh... color always complicates things...

    theyve said all you need to hear, but ill say it again for emphasis... go back to basics and work from life... dont work small, use big newsprint and charcoal if you can.. and dont be timid or shy... if you know someone personally who can draw well, talk to them and get their advice too and see if theyd mind spending a couple hours here and there to help you out... good luck keep the sketchbook coming

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  20. #14
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    Why does it seem that the more i try for realism and such the more I cant think. Its like I draw something that I would normally do, then I just give up because it doesnt seem like it would happen its just difficult. It seems like I have caused art block or whatever because of my striving for realism idk but I cant seem to think on anything anymore...

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    Because youre being too hard on yourself in too short of a time... You think that after trying for a week youll get some great progress and start to see a huge leap toward realism.. doesnt work like that... You have to practice for years and years to understand these things and have the skills to show it... Now, I know its easier said than done, because ive been there, so I do know what im talking about, but you have to let go of trying to have realistic drawings at the moment. But when you finally do, and start to listen to the people who are telling you to draw the simple shapes first, then learn to apply it, you WILL see a large improvement.... As always, thats just the door, and I can only show you... its up to you to walk thru it

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  22. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AxFROWNYxFACE View Post
    Why does it seem that the more i try for realism and such the more I cant think. Its like I draw something that I would normally do, then I just give up because it doesnt seem like it would happen its just difficult. It seems like I have caused art block or whatever because of my striving for realism idk but I cant seem to think on anything anymore...
    Because it's difficult and you don't think it should be. It is, though. It's hard to draw things you're not used to. Just like it's hard to lift weights you're not used to. But if you can't lift the weight you don't think "OMG I've got GYM BLOCK!", you just think that you haven't trained hard enough and you need to train more, perhaps with easier weights. So why blame a mysterious ailment for your lack of art training? Art is hard. If it wasn't we'd all be genius artists. Stop thinking that it should be easy, quit giving up and draw until you get it.

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  24. #17
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    Thanks guys for the advice, I do need to stop being hard on myself and just draw. Get back to the basics and listen to you guys haha. I mean you are professionals.

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=192765

    Theres my sketchbook, I am gonna get a sketch in photoshop done today, wish me luck =D

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  25. #18
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    goodluck get to it

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