Ringling College of Art and Design 2011 hopefuls - Page 9

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  1. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eldritch View Post
    The only con about going to art school is the tuition honestly

    The pros
    -A degree which demonstrates knowledge and work ethic
    Not really. The majority of art school graduates have a pretty limited knowledge of necessary skill sets. Demonstrating knowledge demonstrates knowledge.

    This is why I've always had a problem with grades. They, like a degree, prove nothing.

    -Free access to resources and facilities like life models.
    It's not free at all. Students pay huge quantities of money to have access to the school's resources.

    -Surrounding yourself with peers and mentors who can give immediate criticism and motivation.
    This does not describe my experience at Ringling. I find my Computer Animation teacher to be elitist and condescending, and makes me want to have nothing to do with the medium. He is far, far more interested in cutting students down than building them up.

    In my experience, that is the mentality of most of the CA faculty.

    -And obviously the education. This varies greatly from school to major, but I firmly believe you WILL learn things by going to a 4 year art school. As long as you have the mentality that you will learn, instead of spending the whole time cluttering your thoughts with "I could have done this w/o going to Rtschool hurhudhhdrudurdurdur." When you go to art school you are given all of these, it's up to you whether you utilize it to the utmost or bum around.
    Sure, you will learn things at art school. That was never the question. The question is, "is it worth $100,000+ to be taught something that I could, in fact, be learning on my own?" Especially in today's online world, where learning resources are everywhere.

    For this semester, 95% of what I've learned has been from online resources or peers, both of which I have access to from home for free. I've been wondering to myself why I'm even at this school.

    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?
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  3. #242
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    For this semester, 95% of what I've learned has been from online resources or peers, both of which I have access to from home for free. I've been wondering to myself why I'm even at this school.
    Doesn't this apply to the majority of colleges? Not just art schools? Everything I've learned in my 1.5 years at my university have all come from textbooks with every now and then a professor introducing information not included in them, but then again, come from an article/journal/study you could easily access online.

    Hell, I could camp out in my parent's house and become an expert of something by doing nothing but reading books. But that's silly. And who really wants to do that?

    College is extremely important because it prepares you as an individual. It reveals your work ethic, motivation, willingness to succeed. It helps you be more social, make more connections, be more independent. You can't really get any of this from working on your own and teaching yourself. You need the other perspectives and points of views that will be invaluable to your learning experience.
    -------

    But all in all... why you gotta be so negative, man? Lol. I mean, if you really don't think the school has been right for you, what's holding you back from leaving altogether?

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  5. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by maanas.93 View Post
    @dreamthy how is your portfolio prep is going !!
    I think its coming out nicely :3'' I've been prettyyy slow, though. Still on my fifth piece ^_^' I'll get more done over christmas breakk...thank you for asking! how is your portfolio coming?



    Even if dreams seem out of reach, reach for them.
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  6. #244
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    Not really. The majority of art school graduates have a pretty limited knowledge of necessary skill sets. Demonstrating knowledge demonstrates knowledge.

    This is why I've always had a problem with grades. They, like a degree, prove nothing..
    There is no easier and direct way to prove it than having a degree. If you have two people with the same skill level applying for the same job, the degree will put you to an advantage.


    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    It's not free at all. Students pay huge quantities of money to have access to the school's resources. .
    Stuff that would cost money regardless if you attend school or not. 30 hours of figure drawing costs anywhere from $500 to $800 and is set within a certain time frame of 10 weeks. I don't know about ringling, but I know of other art schools that have workshops open for 8 hours a day. The location is convenient as well

    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    This does not describe my experience at Ringling. I find my Computer Animation teacher to be elitist and condescending, and makes me want to have nothing to do with the medium. He is far, far more interested in cutting students down than building them up

    In my experience, that is the mentality of most of the CA faculty..
    I'm not arguing for Ringling in specific, but art school in general. Obviously there will be students that have bad experiences with teachers and the school or whatnot. But at the same time there are those who find their time at art school invaluable

    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    Sure, you will learn things at art school. That was never the question. The question is, "is it worth $100,000+ to be taught something that I could, in fact, be learning on my own?" Especially in today's online world, where learning resources are everywhere.

    For this semester, 95% of what I've learned has been from online resources or peers, both of which I have access to from home for free. I've been wondering to myself why I'm even at this school.
    If you compare it to the amount of money you'll make in a lifetime it's not that much at all. If having the degree alone will make jobs easier to obtain and keep then I'd say it's worth it, considering how competetive art is. I won't go in on the self-learning thing, since that depends entirely on the individual.

    If you can really claim that everything from the conception to mastery was self learned then good for you, but again you =/= every other art student

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  7. #245
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    Quote Originally Posted by pandadeux View Post
    Doesn't this apply to the majority of colleges? Not just art schools? Everything I've learned in my 1.5 years at my university have all come from textbooks with every now and then a professor introducing information not included in them, but then again, come from an article/journal/study you could easily access online.

    Hell, I could camp out in my parent's house and become an expert of something by doing nothing but reading books. But that's silly. And who really wants to do that?

    College is extremely important because it prepares you as an individual. It reveals your work ethic, motivation, willingness to succeed. It helps you be more social, make more connections, be more independent. You can't really get any of this from working on your own and teaching yourself. You need the other perspectives and points of views that will be invaluable to your learning experience.
    -------

    But all in all... why you gotta be so negative, man? Lol. I mean, if you really don't think the school has been right for you, what's holding you back from leaving altogether?
    I'm not being negative. I'm just saying how it is.
    And what good is a discussion forum if we're only hearing one side of the argument?

    I just think there should be a lot more instruction in the classroom by the instructors. Not just them pointing to the Survival Kit every time we have a question, or linking us to websites. Those additional resources are great, but what unique educational experience is Ringling providing from within?

    Maybe I will leave.

    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?
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  9. #246
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    lowercase, check your PMs

    sketchwax.blogspot.com Updated December 2011
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  10. #247
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    Quote Originally Posted by pandadeux View Post
    Doesn't this apply to the majority of colleges? Not just art schools? Everything I've learned in my 1.5 years at my university have all come from textbooks with every now and then a professor introducing information not included in them, but then again, come from an article/journal/study you could easily access online.

    Hell, I could camp out in my parent's house and become an expert of something by doing nothing but reading books. But that's silly. And who really wants to do that?

    College is extremely important because it prepares you as an individual. It reveals your work ethic, motivation, willingness to succeed. It helps you be more social, make more connections, be more independent. You can't really get any of this from working on your own and teaching yourself. You need the other perspectives and points of views that will be invaluable to your learning experience.
    -------

    But all in all... why you gotta be so negative, man? Lol. I mean, if you really don't think the school has been right for you, what's holding you back from leaving altogether?
    I suppose many of us have been holding off for this "aha" moment where we are finally revealed what we've all been waiting for. If you end up attending this school, or any art school for that matter, I've heard the same thing from many students -- we all have our ebbs and flows; the ones that require us to reflect back on our past to really understand where we are headed.

    For me, I feel that a lot of the reason I stick with this program is that I have something I have to prove to my family (and myself). At this point in my life, I've been stranded without a degree once before and it ended up leaving me jobless for nearly 3 to 4 years due to the economy (I'm not saying thats the decisive reason I was jobless, but it sure would have been nice to have a degree as a crutch).

    Also... I think I'm at the point of no return, where I've already committed so much of my (invisible) debt dollar amount in to student loans that if I didn't continue through, I may not get a job in my career of choice and I will be forced in to repayment on those loans. So at this point I am riding it out, biding my time and making the best of it one way or another, as this is the best move for me financially (and who knows, I may learn a thing or two).

    sketchwax.blogspot.com Updated December 2011
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  11. #248
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowercase View Post
    I'm not being negative. I'm just saying how it is.
    And what good is a discussion forum if we're only hearing one side of the argument?

    I just think there should be a lot more instruction in the classroom by the instructors. Not just them pointing to the Survival Kit every time we have a question, or linking us to websites. Those additional resources are great, but what unique educational experience is Ringling providing from within?

    Maybe I will leave.
    I know "negative" was a bad word to choose. I know you're not being negative but more so, realistic? Or grounded I think would be much better.

    'Cause I'm going to admit I have some pretty damn high expectations about Ringling. When ever i think about the school I imagine, I kid you not, as a grand place with all this saturated light, people smiling everywhere and just having a rockin' time, LOL. It's sickeningly sweet, but I guess it reflects just how much I expect to get out of the place.

    BUT, your perspective on the place is one that is hardly ever voiced but, I guess, brings up a lot of concerns that could be a big issue with some students. However, Any post this brings up the little seed of doubt that all of us pursuing art as a career have. We just don't want those doubts and nagging feelings to surface which I guess is why we get a tad defensive.

    What year are you in, by the way? I want to hear more each classes and your overall experience more in detail if you don't mind sharing. Is there anything that you truly LOVE about the school or is it just all kind of "meh" at this point? Or are you more disappointed that your expectations didn't match up with the reality of things?

    And I'll stop there before it feels like an interrogation, hah.

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  12. #249
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    My experience at Ringling shares some similarities with lowercases' but I can't say I feel exactly the same way. I had a different instructor for Computer Animation 1 and my instructor's personality was completely different from lowercase's instructor. We were encouraged to email and ask as many questions as we wanted. Unlike other classes, our lectures were conducted in a relaxed atmosphere and students brought up many questions that often led to extra demos of things that weren't in the stated curriculum. My CA teacher would often stay an hour later after class to answer questions and make sure everyone got a critique. He graded fairly and treated us with respect. During class breaks, we all eagerly sat to hear about his experiences in the industry.

    Lowercase's statement about his experiences is a sincere reflection of his experiences. In my experience, i felt that my teachers gave me an adequate starting point and my peers helped to further my understanding of my teacher's lectures. We were taught enough of the basics in class but to really be able to produce something of quality, I recieved feedback from many peers. You can always go out and learn Maya on your own, but where to begin can be overwhelming.

    I'm at home working on my 13 inch macbook and it takes me around 20 seconds to render one frame in my animation. Normally at the workstations in the labs it takes me a 3-5 second rendertime. It makes me appreciate the 30 inch monitors and fast computers in the CA labs.

    To learn Illustration on our own or any art that doesnt require high end technology can be completely possible away from an art school. When you're trying to learn 3d art, having the proper equipment,direction,and peer critique feels like its almost worth it.

    Last edited by kedrew; December 15th, 2010 at 06:19 PM.
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  14. #250
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    Quote Originally Posted by pandadeux View Post
    'Cause I'm going to admit I have some pretty damn high expectations about Ringling. When ever i think about the school I imagine, I kid you not, as a grand place with all this saturated light, people smiling everywhere and just having a rockin' time, LOL. It's sickeningly sweet, but I guess it reflects just how much I expect to get out of the place.
    You should take a tour...... I dont want to sound like debbie downer here either, but I dont think you should come in with some sort of marvelous ideal about how you think the program is... because its far from glitz and glamor. Its filled with a lot sleep debt, burly sweaters (to keep warm in the labs), improper eating routines, energy drinks (for some), insane due dates, and no free time or social life. At first it seems manageable, and granted we all accept this upon showing up, but sooner or later, you crack - everyone does.

    Quote Originally Posted by pandadeux View Post
    BUT, your perspective on the place is one that is hardly ever voiced but, I guess, brings up a lot of concerns that could be a big issue with some students. However, Any post this brings up the little seed of doubt that all of us pursuing art as a career have. We just don't want those doubts and nagging feelings to surface which I guess is why we get a tad defensive.
    I'm really not trying to talk badly about the school... I feel like I'm being more realistic than anything else. Think about it this way... if you came to this school, and you had such a horrible time here (I know a few who are), would you really take the time out to come seek out a random forum to vent your frustration to a bunch of people that were hopeful of getting in to the program?? If so, you're one vigilant m--f--'er.

    The reality is, only about 15% of the students I know of have heard of conceptart.org and of those 15%, only about 1/3 of them are active on the forums. So in this rare case, where people like lowercase and myself come to vent our disappointment, it shouldn't necessarily be viewed as negative but moreover as optimistic.

    Quote Originally Posted by kedrew View Post
    I'm at home working on my 13 inch macbook and it takes me around 20 seconds to render one frame in my animation. Normally at the workstations in the labs it takes me a 3-5 second rendertime. It makes me appreciate the 30 inch monitors and fast computers in the CA labs.
    Personally, I cant justify our cost this way. I feel like this argument is so invalid because the cost of what we pay in tuition and lab fees isn't equal to the price of the computers that we use. We could build these kick ass rigs and get shiny monitors and pay out the butt for some software... but at the end of the day, do we have the same kind of motivation and drive? do we have the guidance? the critiques? the shadowing of "their" experience in the industry?


    Oh and one last thing:

    Quote Originally Posted by kedrew View Post
    and peer critique feels like its almost worth it.
    this ^^^^^^



    annnnnnd

    I believe lowercase is a 2nd year CA student. I, myself, am a 2nd year GAD student.

    Last edited by Limewax; December 15th, 2010 at 06:31 PM.
    sketchwax.blogspot.com Updated December 2011
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  15. #251
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    Quote Originally Posted by pandadeux View Post
    I know "negative" was a bad word to choose. I know you're not being negative but more so, realistic? Or grounded I think would be much better.

    'Cause I'm going to admit I have some pretty damn high expectations about Ringling. When ever i think about the school I imagine, I kid you not, as a grand place with all this saturated light, people smiling everywhere and just having a rockin' time, LOL. It's sickeningly sweet, but I guess it reflects just how much I expect to get out of the place.

    BUT, your perspective on the place is one that is hardly ever voiced but, I guess, brings up a lot of concerns that could be a big issue with some students. However, Any post this brings up the little seed of doubt that all of us pursuing art as a career have. We just don't want those doubts and nagging feelings to surface which I guess is why we get a tad defensive.
    What year are you in, by the way? I want to hear more each classes and your overall experience more in detail if you don't mind sharing. Is there anything that you truly LOVE about the school or is it just all kind of "meh" at this point? Or are you more disappointed that your expectations didn't match up with the reality of things?

    I'm a Sophomore.

    Freshman year was mostly a waste. I posted about this on the Ringling 2014 thread on facebook, and took a lot of flack for it, but it's true. 3D Design, Communication Design, Writing, the 2 History classes, even Drawing and Observational Color all sound nice in theory, but in reality they are inadequately taught. The only two classes I thought were worthwhile was Traditional Animation 1 and Intermediate Figure.

    It's a real shame, too, because that's 25% of the Ringling education that isn't being taken advantage of. Freshman year feels completely secluded from the rest of the major, and often aren't invited to a lot of the presentations that occur year round. Ringling could easily improve the curriculum by having Traditional Animation 1 during first semester Freshman year, Traditional Animation 2 during second semester Freshman year, and then not dump TA2 and CA1 on us at the same time during first semester Sophomore year.

    How about a storytelling class? Character design class? How about more figure drawing classes? If you can believe it, many Freshman and Sophomore students (including myself for the second semester in a row) do not have the option of taking a figure drawing class because Ringling does not offer enough. What kind of art school doesn't offer figure classes? Every animation book ever written stresses the importance of figure drawing.

    Is there anything I truly LOVE about the school? Eh, not really. I guess the computer labs are nice, albeit freezing.

    I never had the kind of "sickeningly sweet" expectations that you describe. I always knew it wasn't going to be rainbows and butterflies and whatnot (although freshman year is much closer to that vision then anything after it), but I at least though that the school would be a strong catalyst for me learning the ins and outs of art and design principles, as well as the complex computer programs. I wanted there to be teachers who said, "HERE are the principles. THIS is how it works. THESE are the techniques." Not, "Here is a still life... uhh.. okay figure it out. Here's a model... draw it. Here's Maya... i'll link you to some tutorials."

    The Ringling faculty frequently has meetings trying to figure out how to improve the curriculum, although somehow, year after year, they ignore all the really obvious stuff.

    Patience is a virtue, but who wants to be virtuous?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limewax View Post
    You should take a tour...... I dont want to sound like debbie downer here either, but I dont think you should come in with some sort of marvelous ideal about how you think the program is... because its far from glitz and glamor. Its filled with a lot sleep debt, burly sweaters (to keep warm in the labs), improper eating routines, energy drinks (for some), insane due dates, and no free time or social life. At first it seems manageable, and granted we all accept this upon showing up, but sooner or later, you crack - everyone does.
    I know that I have these unreasonably grand exceptions, but I recognize that they're absurd. I'm already used to expectations not meeting up with reality because my whole life has been one, lol. But I like dreaming. It gives me some comfort and gives me a shit ton of motivation.
    (Plus, I'm already living on energy drinks, burly sweaters (it's cold here, jesus) and sleep deprivation but maybe at Ringling it'll be to an extreme.

    Oh, believe me, if I could I would have taken a tour of the school a long ass time ago, but unfortunately, my family and I are incredibly poor. Hell, I remember even as a child, pieces of paper were something that was a luxury, thus a rarity. I resorted to drawing on my brown paper bags that mom used for my lunch, LOL. I covered that shit up with ponies and unicorns.

    Quote Originally Posted by Limewax View Post
    I'm really not trying to talk badly about the school... I feel like I'm being more realistic than anything else. Think about it this way... if you came to this school, and you had such a horrible time here (I know a few who are), would you really take the time out to come seek out a random forum to vent your frustration to a bunch of people that were hopeful of getting in to the program?? If so, you're one vigilant m--f--'er.
    I guess that's true. I guess unless you vehemently hated the school then you wouldn't go out of your way to be an asshole to a group of hopefuls. :<


    ---

    Buuuuuut, what's still tugging at my strings is why the disappointment? Where exactly is it stemming from for you? I mean, the work that you showed us on the YouTube video is STUNNING. I can only imagine what the quality will be from when the class is in their senior year. Isn't the fact that you're able to produce such a thing now cancel out any sadness/doubt?

    The video you posted excited me. And it's when you look at the students' works that gets people inspired. I mean Ringling isn't named the number one school for computer animation for nothing. It obviously does something right.

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  17. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by pandadeux View Post

    Buuuuuut, what's still tugging at my strings is why the disappointment? Where exactly is it stemming from for you? I mean, the work that you showed us on the YouTube video is STUNNING. I can only imagine what the quality will be from when the class is in their senior year. Isn't the fact that you're able to produce such a thing now cancel out any sadness/doubt?
    I think that part of it has to do with the lackadaisical attitude which many students have towards their work.

    If you have the expectation that when you get to Ringling you will be surrounded by individuals who are obsessed with their art and getting better at it, you will be sorely disappointed. I don't mean to be a grouch, but that is the reality of it. Don't get me wrong though, there will be those individuals who are focused, but in my experience so far, they are in the minority.

    However, I believe it is the same almost anywhere you go, either as a student or professionally. This isn't an issue specific to Ringling.

    That being said, Ringling has its pros and cons, just like every other place on this earth. I think the important thing to keep in mind is that the everyone's experiences are subjective, as shown by the varied views in this thread.

    The only way to know for sure whether or not a place is right for you, is to go there. Just keep in mind, Ringling is not going to live up to your current gold-tinted expectations.

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  19. #254
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    Buuuuuut, what's still tugging at my strings is why the disappointment? Where exactly is it stemming from for you? I mean, the work that you showed us on the YouTube video is STUNNING.
    The work produced at ringling is a lot better than most colleges, but that one video does not reflect the standard quality of everyone's work. As in all art, you'll have the superstars and the mediocre. The 10 videos that make it onto ringling's website are the best of the 40 or so students in the graduating class.

    Haha, remember this is all opinions of individual people. Ultimately, you should just visit and form your own conclusions.

    Last edited by kedrew; December 16th, 2010 at 12:44 AM.
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    Wow. Tons of posts today, lol.

    Yeah, I remember how freaking cold the CA labs were. I brought a sweater but I didn't actually think I'd NEED it. As for my opinion about the program, I think so long as I love the medium and work my damn hardest and go way out of my way to be "awesome" it'll outweigh any negative feelings. I've already planned to not sleep or eat properly, lol, so I'm not going to be surprised when it happens. I figure that I'm not going to be there to fool around. I'm going to be there to learn so I have to make the most out of it. For me it's a test of my responsibility and my work ethic.

    I think the campus is beautiful, but then again it's the only art school I've bothered visiting, and I basically live in the woods so any structure is marvelous. And I'm won over by it not being Pennsylvania so no snow. Directly outside of campus isn't so great, but I can accept that.

    I remember going to the library and looking at Ringling showreels from different years. I didn't actually take them out and watch them, but I remember skimming the backs and noticing the films that weren't on Ringling's website. Haha, I knew that Ringling didn't show all the films though.

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    I have to say in hindsight (almost two years worth), that I can agree with Kedrew and Lowercase's assessment of the school. I loved the people there, Jim McCampbell, Betsy, Yezi, Nilah, and a lotz of other folks but my experience was a scrambling mess my short time there. I can say Ringling is a great school in a lot of ways, but in a lot of other ways it could be better as with most art schools (including my current one). If I were do it again, I personally wouldn't have gone there or at AAU, I would have taken a cheaper and less life changing route i.e TAD, Animation Mentor, local colleges, etc. The one thing I did learn while going there was that I didn't want to be an animator. While I fought REALLY, REALLY hard to get in to the program and was successful twice, I learned that I loved drawing and conception more than clicking a mouse and pulling and pushing nurbs and polygons. I still like to animate every now and then, but I can't see myself doing it always. So, I'm Glad I went to Ringling for the experience but can't say if it was a good choice for ME. For others it has been great, and I can imagine it will be for anyone who wants to go there, but my experiences mirrored lowercase's. Take my comments with a grain of salt. As I said I liked my instructors and most of the staff, although some instructors, I felt could have shined more willing and hardworking coals to diamonds as opposed to looking for who to weed out.

    Last edited by artmessiah; December 16th, 2010 at 12:20 AM.
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  23. #257
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    @dreamthy - ya working hard on it !!!! hmm .... waiting to see your workz!!!

    the future is mine



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  24. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by maanas.93 View Post
    @dreamthy - ya working hard on it !!!! hmm .... waiting to see your workz!!!
    Cool-o. Haha XD I'll get it up sometime...over christmas break. probably. >_X'
    Eghh, the tuition cost of Ringling REALLY has me scared. I know, everyone needs to take risks in life, but thats a really, realllllllllllllllllllllllllllly, large risk. Idkk...trying not to freak out over the price, and tryinggg to focus on portfolio. I still can't help but freak out over it, though.



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  25. #259
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    So many posts! Had to catch up there a bit.
    Well, I suppose I should toss in a little of my own experiences with Ringling, just to join in and flesh out more views from the inside.

    I am a junior CA, soon to be a senior (Yikes!)

    I think so much has been touched on already, in many different ways and views, but 'll go ahead and say it bluntly:

    I love it here.

    I could write horrible amounts of text (I did to tell the truth but then decided not to post it ) I want to keep this really simple.

    The labs are cold, people are often sick, we work ourselves to death, we stumble up the stairs and down the stairs at un-godly hours only to (some of us) go home and sleep for an hour before we go back to work.
    HAHAHA
    Just kidding.
    Well, the labs are cold and people do get sick.....but it's not like you're forced to never sleep and eat very unhealthy. I ate regularly, slept well (except sometimes when I didn't plan my time enough). And that's just it, be good at planning your time. Work hard, talk to your teachers (A LOT! You are paying them!) and don't feel shy to walk up to other people who obviously have some maya or other program experience/are awesome and ask for help, everyone here is crazy nice and will be happy to help, sometimes they even make little videos for everyone !
    Also, always plan ahead, you WILL have tech. problems so make sure you have enough time to solve them if need be.

    I live off campus and I work.
    Why? I'm crazy.
    But really, if you want to graduate with little debt, this is the only way to do it. Be poor, if you have to wait to be old enough to split from your parents, do it. If the government says your dirt poor, they will give you aid, aid equals less in loans, less in loans equals a much happier you. Also, good grades help. If you do not have a good GPA, I suggest going to a community college and bringing it up. For anything in my tuition that the government, Florida (helps if you live here more then a year or so, you get aid as a Florida resident) and scholarships didn't cover, I paid for while in school. Yup, I worked during school up till now so that I could pay loan payments while in school, no interest this way and they get paid off ! I also live off campus. It's WAY cheaper.

    Darn....this is getting a little long....
    ok, Teachers....I guess I've been lucky? But then again I did my homework, asked around, even stalked some of the teachers a little, and was able to pick the teacher I knew would teach me and that I would enjoy (I can not stand teachers that don't offer ANY constructive criticism and we do have them here). Some people might like teachers that don't smile and hold your hand, but hey, what can I say, I love that type of teacher, because I thrive on positive feedback and if you do too, then I strongly suggest doing everything in your power to get a teacher you want. So far every teacher I've had has
    -Answered emails WITH videos showing me what I did wrong and how to fix it, or, extensive instructions.
    -In class they give demos, and then, they give their "own" demos. Just this past semester I had Keith for CA....I have never leaned that much about animation, I don't really like to animate, but he made me enjoy it again Why? Because he sat down for us, and showed us "Here's how I do things, here's the tools I use, Step 1, I like to blah blah blah....
    my face --->>>> 8D
    Then he went around the room many times over to anyone who needed help and did awesome little drawings to show us what poses worked better, etc. For people like me that are not crazy about animation, he showed me lots of great tips and taught me more about lighting and texturing through bugging him. Sean and Ed did this as well. Sean being a great animator, Ed being really tech. savvy and of course, all of them being really nice and easy to talk to.

    In the end, if you come here, take advantage of every little thing. And you can walk away being satisfied. Don't expect to just follow tutorials (they do link them for reference) really ask questions and your teacher will teach you. Again, you are paying them to.


    Man this is long, and most likely will not make any sense when I read it tomorrow...It's crazy late and I should be sleeping, but hey....
    Last thing.

    Freshman year? From what I've heard after talking to teachers and such, there is going to be a major change in how freshman year is constructed. A little late for some of us, but not for you guys. In fact, the majors are always changing, being tweaked and perfected. I'm excited to see the changes when they take place, I just hope they are for the better.

    OK....I think this is long enough...and poorly written But I hope it helps some of you. That's what all of us upper class man are here for. To help you guys ! Feel free to PM me or just reply here and I'll try my best to answer....

    Also! I'm friends with sula_nebuxi the guy who sort of started this madness a long long time ago, I'll see if I can't bug him to post his wisdom here as well for you all. Oh! He's working at Rhythm and Hues now!<<<----- ( proof you have hope of getting a job when you get out of here D8!)

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  27. #260
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    Awesome for sula. I still have no Idea why that's his user name. I met him last semester btw.

    Haha speaking of curriculum change I think there should have been a mandatory figure gesture drawing class in the curriculum, as well as a drafting for Traditional Animators class.

    http://kedrewdraws.blogspot.com

    My Adventures at Ringling ^
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  28. #261
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    anyone in facebook ??

    the future is mine



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    @lizzybeth

    -That is unless you want to advance yourself in an area not covered by the course material/beyond the course material or are not utilizing your teachers (ie, not asking them for the appropriate feedback, which they are more than happy to give, trust me, and they give very good feedback).
    I agree with that. I've done two years of graphic design at my local college and it is similar in that there is lecture for the first part and they give us a general direction to go in, but after that it is up to us. In the end there is a class critique, but one could work up until the due date without asking the professor for an opinion. which if that is the case the student usually does a bad job. The professor is there for guidance and quick questions, but for anything extra or special we usually turn to outside resources. That's been my experience. Would you say this is similar with ringling?


    Also, I was going to apply to Calarts, but I just found out that they DON'T have 3d animation at all?? Why do I read so much about them if gusty don't even have the program? I know they have traditional animation, but it seems silly to spend all that money and time on school when you aren't even learning what you want. Do people go there and learn traditional and then learn 3d on their own?

    2011 Ringling Hopeful! ^_^
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  30. #263
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    cal arts porgamme is "CHARACTER ANIMATION" its not "COMPUTER ANIMATION" .. the point is that whether you paint on the canvas or in photoshop it is same . but the tougher is doing in tradition that is on canvas . if you can do this then you can do it on any softwares wherther it is photoshop or corel painter . its just tools which you should learn .
    cal arts focuses mainly in animation .. so they teach you 2d which is harder and the best way to learn animation principles .... if you can do this perfectly then you can learn tools and animate in 3d ... you can learn these while you intern at studios . " if you learn animation in 2d at the core 3d is just a tool nothing else " ..
    i am sorry if i have said anything wrong .. please do correct me if i am wrong !!

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    Hi everyone! I'm another fall 2011 hopeful applying for illustration. I'm planning to transfer to Ringling after I get my AAS in the spring. I have a few questions about Ringling and I thought I would get more honest answers from here than the admissions, so here I go....

    1. How is class scheduling at Ringling? Is it flexible, like can I make my own schedule? One of the reasons why I'm transferring out of my current college is that I'm only allowed to choose one of the already made schedules (called block schedules). It's just very inconvenient for me and makes it hard for me to catch up with classes, so this is very important.

    2. Can I work in the studio alone, or pull an all-nighter in the studio? This is also very important because my current college doesn't allow a student to work by him/herself in the studio (you need a fellow student to work with in the same studio) and they only allow students to stay until 2 AM. (another reason why I'm getting outta here!) I wanna go to a school where I can work as long as I want especially during midterm/fianls. I understand that studios need to be cleaned before classes so maybe until 6 AM or something....

    3. I already read a few posts about minors at Ringling that most people minor in either Photography & Digital Imaging or Fine Arts. But how about Business of Art & Design? I wanna go for editorial illustration and advertising field but also freelance, and I think minoring in business might help me marketing my work? Is it worth it?

    4. I checked out the offered studio electives and I see that some electives need instructor's approval. I was planning to take some GIC related electives (web design, typography) because I want to have a graphic design background as well... Is it hard to get approvals to take classes from other majors?

    5. I don't wanna sound stupid but just to be clear, GC, GIC, GAD... they all mean Graphic & Interactive Communication, right? -_-;

    6. This question is not about Ringling but it's for those who are in/applying for illustration major. Do you think that being an illustrator is a limited job, like you don't get the freedom to create what YOU want to create because you're creating it for someone else like companies and what not? I'm asking this because I'm currently a fine arts major and when I told my colleagues that I'm changing my major to illustration because I wanna create what I want to create, they were being really judgmental and told me you don't get to do that in illustration. (the fine arts and illustration majors at my school don't get along very well...) Sure, when you get commissioned by your clients, you gotta create what THEY want, but they hire you based on your portfolio, which is YOUR ideas. I also know that there are many illustrators that create what they want and freelance/market their works. So what do you think about this?

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  32. #265
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    Quote Originally Posted by itraenk View Post
    I agree with that. I've done two years of graphic design at my local college and it is similar in that there is lecture for the first part and they give us a general direction to go in, but after that it is up to us. In the end there is a class critique, but one could work up until the due date without asking the professor for an opinion. which if that is the case the student usually does a bad job. The professor is there for guidance and quick questions, but for anything extra or special we usually turn to outside resources. That's been my experience. Would you say this is similar with ringling?
    Yes this is generally the case. The nice thing about the "general direction" kind of a thing is that it allows you to try out things or take them in a different direction than others usually do, so long as you are satisfying the parameters of the assignment. There is a little more instructor involvement here though. They usually do "rounds" once a week where they'll come around and check in with everybody to see how they're doing, answer questions, offer critique, and anything else student specific. It's only for 10 minutes though. The classes are small (I think our junior CA classes were at 11-13 per class this last semester) but to get to everyone in the class they have to budget their time and will even use a stopwatch to make sure they get to everybody in that class. So you'll communicate with the instructor several times before it's due. Staying on track, having your work ready, knowing what you want, and having questions ready will help you get the most from your instructor in those ten minutes. They are usually available outside of class too, largely through email, although sometimes there are times where they are really busy grading, going to senior crits, etc where you may not get a reply back promptly, but they're pretty good about it.


    Quote Originally Posted by itraenk View Post
    Also, I was going to apply to Calarts, but I just found out that they DON'T have 3d animation at all?? Why do I read so much about them if gusty don't even have the program? I know they have traditional animation, but it seems silly to spend all that money and time on school when you aren't even learning what you want. Do people go there and learn traditional and then learn 3d on their own?
    yeah, CalArts doesn't really have a 3d program. Some students have made 3d films, but as I understand that stuff was mostly self taught, possibly mentored by a faculty, I'm not entirely sure. Flash has been a pretty popular medium over there lately as well. Within the past few years I think they've been doing some pretty interesting stuff over there with computer animation (...not 3d) and things may be shifting. If you really want to do 3d animation though I would recommend going to ringling. Calarts can't really shake a stick at ringling in that area....

    Quote Originally Posted by catsmeow View Post
    1. How is class scheduling at Ringling? Is it flexible, like can I make my own schedule? One of the reasons why I'm transferring out of my current college is that I'm only allowed to choose one of the already made schedules (called block schedules). It's just very inconvenient for me and makes it hard for me to catch up with classes, so this is very important.
    Student's pick their own classes at ringling (except first semester, unless there's empty spaces where you need to pick electives). Some classes are prescheduled. This happens moreso in illustration than elsewhere I think but I don't think it's that much. The rest of the classes you can chose yourself. Of course when registering you have to make sure you hit all your required classes for your major. Class availability can be an issue too at times in regards to electives. Upperclassmen register first so more popular electives fill up fast. Not all classes are offered all the time. Some are only spring or fall.

    Quote Originally Posted by catsmeow View Post
    2. Can I work in the studio alone, or pull an all-nighter in the studio? This is also very important because my current college doesn't allow a student to work by him/herself in the studio (you need a fellow student to work with in the same studio) and they only allow students to stay until 2 AM. (another reason why I'm getting outta here!) I wanna go to a school where I can work as long as I want especially during midterm/fianls. I understand that studios need to be cleaned before classes so maybe until 6 AM or something....
    no. ringling has similar rules for studios. Most are only open until 2am. CA labs are only open until midnight. Printmaking labs 10pm or midnight. Photo labs 2am. There are a few labs that have become 24 hour labs now in the illustration building (open to everybody). 2 are computer labs (one has tablets) and 1 is a classroom studio where a lot of illustrators will work on their traditional assignments. During crunch times these labs can get kind of full and stay full all night so be able to do your stuff on your own if you have to. Sometimes they will make late hours for the other studios (or upperclassmen CAs in those labs), usually around midterms or end of the semester.

    Quote Originally Posted by catsmeow View Post
    3. I already read a few posts about minors at Ringling that most people minor in either Photography & Digital Imaging or Fine Arts. But how about Business of Art & Design? I wanna go for editorial illustration and advertising field but also freelance, and I think minoring in business might help me marketing my work? Is it worth it?
    I know of a few people doing the business minor but I don't really know much about it and I haven't heard anything bad for sure. It's actually a rather popular minor too.

    Quote Originally Posted by catsmeow View Post
    4. I checked out the offered studio electives and I see that some electives need instructor's approval. I was planning to take some GIC related electives (web design, typography) because I want to have a graphic design background as well... Is it hard to get approvals to take classes from other majors?
    The ones that need instructor approval are the ones that require prerequisites. There's no for sure whether or not you can get in to those sorts of classes. Most people, it seems, don't have much trouble getting instructor approval to get into classes but they're usually getting into open electives or liberal arts or know the teacher. It may happen but don't bank on it. Illustration does also take intro to GIC and they might do some web stuff in their portfolio class.

    Quote Originally Posted by catsmeow View Post
    5. I don't wanna sound stupid but just to be clear, GC, GIC, GAD... they all mean Graphic & Interactive Communication, right? -_-;
    no. Good thing you asked. GIC is graphic and interactive communication. GAD is game art and design. I'm not sure what GC is.... that might be some liberal arts prefix because there's not major abbreviated GC.


    Quote Originally Posted by catsmeow View Post
    6. This question is not about Ringling but it's for those who are in/applying for illustration major. Do you think that being an illustrator is a limited job, like you don't get the freedom to create what YOU want to create because you're creating it for someone else like companies and what not? I'm asking this because I'm currently a fine arts major and when I told my colleagues that I'm changing my major to illustration because I wanna create what I want to create, they were being really judgmental and told me you don't get to do that in illustration. (the fine arts and illustration majors at my school don't get along very well...) Sure, when you get commissioned by your clients, you gotta create what THEY want, but they hire you based on your portfolio, which is YOUR ideas. I also know that there are many illustrators that create what they want and freelance/market their works. So what do you think about this?
    (I'm not an illustration major but I've taken an ill class and have been around ill majors a fair bit) I think your ideas about this are pretty right on. Yes you'll be commissioned to do something specific but it's up to the illustrator to do it in an interesting way. Josh Cochran was the judge for Illest of Ill this past year (a student run illustration show) and gave a great talk. In his work he'd do the illustration, but not in a way you would expect, he might even hide it within the image.

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    If anyone has a minute could you critique my sketchbook. I'm stressing out a lot lately about whether I'm good enough to get in. . (I'm applying for illustration). sketchbook

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    Quote Originally Posted by gabbyness View Post
    If anyone has a minute could you critique my sketchbook. I'm stressing out a lot lately about whether I'm good enough to get in. . (I'm applying for illustration). sketchbook
    Don't stress at all, chances are you'll be better than the majority of incoming freshmen. You can get in easily, just make sure your portfolio is in order.

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    Quote Originally Posted by drd View Post
    Don't stress at all, chances are you'll be better than the majority of incoming freshmen. You can get in easily, just make sure your portfolio is in order.
    Thank you. It's hard for me not to stress though

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    hello~ i'm new to conceptart..i've only lurked a while on this thread.
    I'm a ringling 2011 CA hopeful. :] I found that many of my issues and questions have been frequently answered by reading this thread so I'm thankful.
    Decided to come out to get some feedback on sketchbook?

    I still need to get pictures of my other stuff and upload it but yeah. > <
    Thank youuuu

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    @copperfire - i am still waiting for your post in my sketchbook

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