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Thread: Ringling College of Art and Design 2011 hopefuls

  1. #92
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    that was an awesome link ... thank you nilaffle and yyates05
    the future is mine



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  3. #93
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    new questions after a bit of a hiatus;

    a) when creating our work for our portfolios, what type of size constraints should we be staying within?
    I've looked for the information and couldn't find it. since we send the portfolios digitally, maybe it doesn't matter? Either way what is your personal advice?

    b1) I am a bit confused when it comes to the subject matter of a given observational portfolio piece.
    How can a reviewer tell the difference between a drawing from life, or a drawing from a photo from life? Is it better to sit outside and paint a picture of a tree in changing light, or to take a picture of said tree of choice, so it would be an original image, and paint it that way.

    b2) As well i have looked over some portfolios sent and accepted, and i've seen several gesture drawings, and sketches.
    how does one create a "finished" gesture drawing. i understand what a gesture drawing is, but like a contour drawing, in my opinion the loose lines and lack of form, emphasis on lines and shapes, seem incomplete in my opinion. How can one get into an art school on a drawing that takes only a few seconds, and only makes an open impression of form?

    in advance i would like to thank any and all who answer me. thank you.
    Fudge this AWESOME place!!!

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  4. #94
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    guys critique on my work .... below is the link
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  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by themegagod View Post
    new questions after a bit of a hiatus;

    a) when creating our work for our portfolios, what type of size constraints should we be staying within?
    I've looked for the information and couldn't find it. since we send the portfolios digitally, maybe it doesn't matter? Either way what is your personal advice?

    b1) I am a bit confused when it comes to the subject matter of a given observational portfolio piece.
    How can a reviewer tell the difference between a drawing from life, or a drawing from a photo from life? Is it better to sit outside and paint a picture of a tree in changing light, or to take a picture of said tree of choice, so it would be an original image, and paint it that way.

    b2) As well i have looked over some portfolios sent and accepted, and i've seen several gesture drawings, and sketches.
    how does one create a "finished" gesture drawing. i understand what a gesture drawing is, but like a contour drawing, in my opinion the loose lines and lack of form, emphasis on lines and shapes, seem incomplete in my opinion. How can one get into an art school on a drawing that takes only a few seconds, and only makes an open impression of form?

    in advance i would like to thank any and all who answer me. thank you.
    To answer your first question, the size of your works doesn’t matter. You are going to have to document the dimensions in Ringling SlideRoom. Personally I like to work large since adding more detail to your work is easier.

    If you’re good at drawing, I think there is no way to really tell if the drawing is from life or not. Understanding the anatomy of light and shadow (highlight, mid-tone, core shadow, reflective light, etc) makes a big difference in determining where your drawing is believable. A lot of students fall short in these aspects making their piece appear flat. It’s always good practice to draw from life since it is more difficult but you can see details you wouldn’t be able to find in a photograph plus Ringling does a lot of life drawing so be prepare.

    Gesture drawings are meant to look incomplete. Unlike contour drawing, gesture drawing capture movement and energy and can be more expressive than a complete rendering. If you can convey that, then your job is done. To me, that is more of a complete drawing that a contour one. I’ve seen students include a series of gesture pose in one piece or they combine gesture drawings into one. My only suggestion is to go to a book store or Amazon and get some good gesture drawing books and study the variation of lines, forms, and curves artist uses.
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  6. #96
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    all this is such great advice. thank you everyone who keeps this threat active!!

    yes, i'm also a computer animation hopeful, hopefully filling out the common app and hopefully gathering together a portfolio.. but my main concerns are the financial aid and moving to florida all the way from new england.

    good luck to us all)))
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  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by themegagod View Post
    new questions after a bit of a hiatus;

    b2) As well i have looked over some portfolios sent and accepted, and i've seen several gesture drawings, and sketches.
    how does one create a "finished" gesture drawing. i understand what a gesture drawing is, but like a contour drawing, in my opinion the loose lines and lack of form, emphasis on lines and shapes, seem incomplete in my opinion. How can one get into an art school on a drawing that takes only a few seconds, and only makes an open impression of form?

    in advance i would like to thank any and all who answer me. thank you.
    =)) you'll be surprised at how many people can do a finished, nicely rendered piece, but still struggle when it comes to gestures. all you need is a few lines to tell you what the pose is about. if you're going for character animation, gestures are the most important aspect of figure drawing to learn, because animation is all about capturing the spirit and life of a character. the details can come later. here at ringling, we have a figure drawing club (FEWS) 4 times a week, and the only session that the CA upperclassmen come for is gesture night =P basically it's almost 3 hours of gesture drawings. And before every figure drawing class, we have to do a series of 30 seconds to 2 minutes gestures for 20 minutes before moving on to longer poses. That's how important gestures are.

    even in doing a long pose, our figure teacher still emphasizes on gestures. so take 2 minutes to do the gesture of the pose, then spend the rest of the time putting in the muscles, structure and rendering it. if you dive straight into making it look shaded and pretty, you'll realize that in the end your drawing lacks life and energy, it's just a pretty picture.

    =) good luck!
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  8. #98
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    Hey, Cat! Yeah Its a really nice school. Expensive...but nice x_x;; and sure, np.


    Even if dreams seem out of reach, reach for them.
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  9. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by pandadeux View Post
    @DreamythT
    Thank you so much for taking notes ;___;!!! *Gives you a virtual hug* Sometimes I wish I lived in Florida since it would make things so much easier... but at the same time I think I love the west coast way too much to imagine living elsewhere, lol.
    Uhuhuhu! No problem :] Wow, you live on the west coast? I've lived in Florida my whole life- its pretty nice down here though. Especially freaking Sarasota! Its beautiful down there! * _ *


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  10. #100
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    Hey guys, new here and I tried posting this on various answer sites, but this looks like my best shot to get answers.


    I'm currently a junior in high school and I need to start thinking about college. I didn't really know where to start, so I decided to find a school that has strong programs relating to my interests, mainly theater, animation, and computer stuff in general. I was snooping around a bit when my friend showed me a viewbook from Ringling where I saw that it was the #1 Computer Animation school in the US as ranked by 3dWorld Magazine. At first I was skeptical, but then I researched the school online and it looked really promising. A huge plus is that I live about 40 minutes from Sarasota, so location is no problem, and I have Florida Prepaid as well as the Bright Futures Scholarship, so tuition wouldn't be as bad.

    However, my parents aren't completely thrilled at the notion of me attending a non-academic college so I want to make sure this is a really good school and that I have a shot at getting in. Here's where the questions come into play:

    1. Is the CA program at Ringling really THAT good?
    2. Does admissions look for art skill in your portfolio or animation skill?
    3. If you don't really have the aforementioned art skill, do you still have a shot at getting in?
    4. Based on my current interests (Theater, Computers, Animation), do you think this is a good choice for me? Note that I've tried putting thought into a career before, and this is the most attached I've gotten to an idea.
    Thanks so much for reading and (hopefully) answering
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  11. #101
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    Hey Shiden. I'm currently a senior CA student, working on my thesis film. Hopefully I can answer most of your questions.

    1.) Ringling's CA program really IS that good. It's unmatched--really. Animation Mentor's online program teaches you how to animate well, but that's IT. (Also, you don't get a degree from AM). Academy of Art University is similar in that you won't be well-rounded. At SCAD and CalArts, you don't even have to FINISH your films. Ringling produces the strongest 3D generalists around--which is the way the industry is moving. I interned at Sony Pictures Animation over the summer, and this was something brought up. More and more studios are wanting people with multiple skillsets. You'll get that education at Ringling.

    Not to mention... Recruiters to Ringling include Disney, Pixar, Dreamworks, Blue Sky, Sony, Laika, EA, ActiVision, Blizzard.... Just to name a few. Literally. That's just a small handful of all of the companies that recruit (AND HIRE!) at Ringling in the spring.

    2.) Admissions looks only at your ability to draw from life. Draw representationally!

    3.) You really do need to have strong drawing skills to get into the CA program. However, the good news is that ANYONE can learn how to draw from life! You just look at what's there...and draw it! It's not like you need to pull things from your head.

    4.) Those are all skills that feed into animation, yes. Whether or not you'd be happy doing it as a career is a question only you can answer. See if you can take some classes either at your high school or maybe do dual enrollment at a Community College and just play around with Maya. The best way to figure out if you like it is to get your feet wet!

    As far as your parents not being thrilled... Well, if you wanted to be a lawyer, you'd go to Harvard, right? Well... if you want to work in the animation industry, you need to go to a school that's equally specialized. Ringling fits the bill.

    And the biggest, biggest, BIGGEST thing I can recommend is to visit Ringling yourself! (And you should come schedule a tour for a Monday morning--I'll be your tour guide, then! )
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  12. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by thesinfulsaint View Post
    Hey Shiden. I'm currently a senior CA student, working on my thesis film. Hopefully I can answer most of your questions.

    1.) Ringling's CA program really IS that good. It's unmatched--really. Animation Mentor's online program teaches you how to animate well, but that's IT. (Also, you don't get a degree from AM). Academy of Art University is similar in that you won't be well-rounded. At SCAD and CalArts, you don't even have to FINISH your films. Ringling produces the strongest 3D generalists around--which is the way the industry is moving. I interned at Sony Pictures Animation over the summer, and this was something brought up. More and more studios are wanting people with multiple skillsets. You'll get that education at Ringling.

    Not to mention... Recruiters to Ringling include Disney, Pixar, Dreamworks, Blue Sky, Sony, Laika, EA, ActiVision, Blizzard.... Just to name a few. Literally. That's just a small handful of all of the companies that recruit (AND HIRE!) at Ringling in the spring.

    2.) Admissions looks only at your ability to draw from life. Draw representationally!

    3.) You really do need to have strong drawing skills to get into the CA program. However, the good news is that ANYONE can learn how to draw from life! You just look at what's there...and draw it! It's not like you need to pull things from your head.

    4.) Those are all skills that feed into animation, yes. Whether or not you'd be happy doing it as a career is a question only you can answer. See if you can take some classes either at your high school or maybe do dual enrollment at a Community College and just play around with Maya. The best way to figure out if you like it is to get your feet wet!

    As far as your parents not being thrilled... Well, if you wanted to be a lawyer, you'd go to Harvard, right? Well... if you want to work in the animation industry, you need to go to a school that's equally specialized. Ringling fits the bill.

    And the biggest, biggest, BIGGEST thing I can recommend is to visit Ringling yourself! (And you should come schedule a tour for a Monday morning--I'll be your tour guide, then! )
    Ha, ha. Ringling needs to put you on the pay roll girl. I'm sure you've gotten more people to get to Ringling than anyone else next to Sula Nuboxi (I think thatz his name on here) who invented these Ringling threads. Glad to see you're giving tours there. There isn't a more rounded, nice and great person doing it. Hope you are good today.
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  13. #103
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    Wow! Thanks for the response!

    I was planning to go to the open house this Saturday morning, but something came up and I'm not able to make it D: And I've been doing some 2d animation for about a year now and I find it really enjoyable, so I'd love to make a career out of it. I'll try to schedule a visit when I can, and when that time comes I'll contact you, so thanks for the offer

    Also, one more question: Do you know if Ringling accepts Bright Futures and/or Florida Prepaid? I wasn't really sure about that. Thanks bunched for the reply! For now, I'm gonna go work on my life drawing skills 8D *arts*
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  14. #104
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    Hey again Shiden,

    Yep! I'm pretty sure that Ringling accepts both. However, it's not a percentage with Ringling's tuition--I think it caps out at $3k or $5k or something. Talk to a real admissions counselor for the specifics.


    And hahahaha artmessiah. Man, hope you're having a great time, too! Senior year is so much better than previous years! (For a 1 character film, anyway!)
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