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Thread: Ramin's SketchBook

  1. #53
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    You've got the most important ingredient; MOTIVATION. That and practice, that's what you need to get good.

    Now, when looking at your sketches the one thing that immediately stands out is the messed up proportions. When drawing, you have to start at one point, and compare that point to other things you draw.

    As a basic example; You are drawing figures from posemaniacs and you're doing longer poses where you have time to measure things out. Draw the head first. Now, when putting down the entire figure (this is a light sketch to see where everything should go), look at the figure and check how many heads high the figure is. When you are drawing a chest, check how many times the head would fit in the chest, etc etc etc. That way, everything is in proportion and things wont look as strange as they do right now.

    Something I would really suggest you read is "Drawing on the right side of the brain". I don't care if you download it, order it online, look for it where you live, whatever, just try to find it and use it, it will help you see things as they are instead of seeing things how you think they are.

    Don't say you will work on basic shapes and then just not do it; JUST DO IT! Draw cubes, spheres, cylinders, everything, draw them till you can rotate them in every position in your head, then draw those positions. How well you will progress depends on how well you know your basic shapes, so work on them. They will become essential in constructing the human figure and everything you will ever draw!

    Keep drawing!
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  3. #54
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    Hello there, raminafshari!

    When doing gestures, the keys to keeping them loose is to draw quickly, draw with a continuous line/mark, and draw from the inside-out. Drawing from the inside-out will not only help you learn about the general shape of the figure, but it will also help you get quick information about the form and capture the body's natural "movement."

    Here is an example of a gesture drawing: http://artfromintuition.files.wordpr...2/gesture5.jpg

    And here you can read about the different types of gestures and how to do them: http://instruct.tri-c.edu/glaguar/gesture.html

    Also, I think your portraits could benefit from some cross contour exercises. Cross contour is where you draw lines that follow the form and curvature of an object.

    Here's an example of a cross contour: http://www.rebeccakimmel.com/gallery...rawing-002.jpg

    Happy drawing, and good luck on your artistic journey.
    --------------------------------------------
    "It's pointless to hate people . . ." - Gale from Digital Devil Saga 2

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  4. #55
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    Good to see you're working at this stuff, raminafshari. Someone might have already said this but I would suggest looking up figure drawing workshops or classes in your local area. Practicing working from life (as lots of people already mentioned) helps a lot. Keep it up
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  5. #56
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    Hey raminafshari,

    Good work ethic!

    My main advice for you at this point would be to practice some "comparitive measurement." (This involves using your thumb and pencil as a sighting tool to measure rough vertical and horizontal distances.)

    Bert Dodson's Keys To Drawing should have a good academic description of this.

    That way, you can get proportions [like on your wrinkly old man] locked in before you get too far along with rendering values on something that is a bit off in places.
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  6. #57
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    Hey I really see progress from the first page to the next! Keep up the good work habits and I am sure you will go far!

    Another tip I would give is to always start with simple shapes and work up. Or use construction lines to layout the figure.
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  7. #58
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    Anatomy is not a easy thing to do. A lot of studies will take you deeper than you will ever need to know, unless you plan on becoming a doctor. When drawing think of people being a little more solid. Muscles moving only changes shading on the surface. They bent at joints, so what will help is to be able to draw basic shape joined with circles for joint regions, that has a standard length and size. Something that will make it look right, like the thigh and the shin are the same length, the foot might be half that length, and you can measure everything, and see how you compare the sizes with each other so each part is equal to something you also draw. I like to add that every part of the body effects the size of other parts, so if you have short legs you will have short arms as long as there is a normal growth. When you have short arms you will have a wide chest. The reason would come from an overall measurement. If you spread your arms out, from fingertip to finger tip would be your height. If you arms are long you chest would be narrow. I measured a tailor fit for a vest, starting at the small of the back to the back of the neck. I measured a lot of people of different sizes and it looked like everyone was 41 inches. Your eyes can see people and look at other things to imagine their size like a doorway is something a standard size, because you can not look at a person and say the are the wrong size. They have proportions, but with most backbones being the same height someone really good can look at the design of a person with normal growth and say they are 5'2'', 5'8" or what ever so there are things that don't change, but not many, heads may seem to be the same size because glasses has just a few different sizes. So you can learn from someone else that did all this years ago and take their word for it or make your own studies. Meanwhile draw other things. it looks like you need to practice on the proportions of simple shapes. Develop your ability to match the shapes you see. Take on easier man made shapes. When you are ready for people check out DC Comics or draw people without muscles for a start.
    Last edited by AChipps; August 12th, 2010 at 08:22 AM.
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  8. #59
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    good start with the practices you already have going on. I can tell you are working hard just keep up with that detention and practice and you will go far !!

    BTW, check out this thread of rookie that has gone though great impovement. It was great inspiration for me and for you too.

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=870 .
    Critiques on my work always welcome!!

    Sketchbook:

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=229693
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  9. #60
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    That last one is much better. it doesn't matter what you use as long as you keep drawing. Try a few still lives as they will improve your form.
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  10. #61
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    hey guys i tried these new drawings to understand coloring and lightning and ... i know there are a lots of problems but i dont know how can i work on them more
    Last edited by raminafshari; August 18th, 2010 at 01:15 PM.
    On And On , I Am Cursed To Live Cursed With Life Until I Have Done What Done What Must Be Done . . . I Am The Man Who Would Not Die .
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  12. #62
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    Good to see you working so hard. When you've finished a piece, think about what's wrong with it and try to bring that to your next drawing. You still need to get to grips with basic forms before you try to apply them to the human body, which is why I recommended doing some still lives - spheres, cones, column and blocks will all help.
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  13. #63
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    this time i tried and results was better but i think its because i changed the material of drawing draw 2 man .
    Last edited by raminafshari; August 18th, 2010 at 01:04 PM.
    On And On , I Am Cursed To Live Cursed With Life Until I Have Done What Done What Must Be Done . . . I Am The Man Who Would Not Die .
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  14. #64
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    likewise, I would usually recommend to try sketching it out traditionally. But where you're going now, in just 3 pages, you're getting good at what you're doing. Produce some more loose messy sketches which are also useful. Keep it up!
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  15. #65
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    Raminarfshari You are really dedicated. Thats great to see I have a little advise for you. Try to loose the soft edge brush and use a hard edge bush and just use the picker (alt button on pc) to pick the transition colors to get the softer transitions. To much softedge (or airbrush as I usually call it) often tend to make paintings look muddy. Keep up the good work
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