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  1. #1
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    Digital paintings and studies.

    in the spirit of critique week, ill post these. Also ill be doing critiques as well!

    Lets make magic happen!

    I would like some hardcore critiques mostly concerning my painting and areas that i could use improvement on and practice.

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  3. #2
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    Nice works! I'm going to crit only the first, because I think there should only be one image per thread, and it's the closest to a portfolio piece.

    This work is good, but it's not finished. It needs some polish. Certain features need defining, and you need to refine your sense of which brushwork to leave loose and which to tighten up, to create a focal point.

    The features most important are the eyes. They're the window into the soul of your character, and they always reveal what a person is thinking, if they're focused, unfocused, contemplative, etc. The eyes and the mouth give most of a character's expression. I'd like to see these eyes refined, each line crisper, the shapes and shadows molded - remove all the blur. The line of the lips needs definition - his lips seem pursed, unnaturally. His upper lip has no definition. His left jowl loses its definition around the moustache - they should connect. His cheek bone seems too high and too prominent. It's odd. His nose looks good, but a little small, espcially around the nostrils. And I'd complete the definition, at least partially, to construct his head at the top. And I'd define the top of his ear - the highlights.

    Great colors and it's almost there!

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  5. #3
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    Very nice, though I think a couple of these could do with 5 to 10 minutes extra spent polishing them up a bit. In particular the bottle. The actual bottle looks good but I think the messy background is a bit too distracting for me. The same idea with the first pic. It looks pretty good already but I think some of the edges around his eyes could with being a bit more difined. Hopeful that helps you a bit.

    Edit - Ahhh, TASmith got there before me

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  7. #4
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    Your painting process is leaving an extremely digital residue on the final product. As a result, form can sometimes get confused and the textures do not appear to be match what they should be. One common reason for this using the wrong brushes to paint objects. For example, in the last piece you used extremely scratchy brushes to paint extremely smooth surfaces (plastic and glass). Before you paint anything, really try to consider the surface and transparency of the object, and then choose your brush accordingly.

    Another common reason for the digital mark is that you might be using the "flow" setting to control the pressure of the mark that your standard brush makes, when you should be using the "opacity" setting to control this. Also, try not to adjust these settings during the painting process. Utilize the pen pressure control on your tablet to make both light marks and dark marks. Don't constantly switch back and forth between low opacity/flow and high opacity/flow settings.

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  9. #5
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    Stuff's looking good so far! The head mostly looks good, and I like the red tube in the bottom still life. Everyone here's covered most of anything I'd crit, I'd just add that you don't necessary need specific brushes for different materials- you can get pretty far with a hard round. However, use a bigger brush! Start big and narrow in as you go, it'll help avoid the 'dirty' look.

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  11. #6
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    I think the work looks pretty good.

    The only crit I'd add is that you don't seem to be giving to much consideration to placement within the rectangle.

    The planar head, for example, is butting right up to the top and bottom edges of the frame and crowding the space. The girl has a similar problem for me.

    One thing to try is to maybe take one or a few simple objects in a simple arrangement and do a bunch of thumbnails in which the only thing you change is their placement in the rectangle. This might heighten a sense for how things relate in two dimensional space and how one can charge a negative space and make a piece more dynamic simply by where it's subject is placed in the frame.

    "Contrary to the belief of the layman, the essential of art is not to imitate nature, but under the guise of imitation to stir up excitement with pure plastic elements: measurements, directions, ornaments, lights, values, colors, substances, divided and organized according to the injunctions of natural laws. While so occupied, the artist never ceases to be subservient to nature, but instead of imitating the incidents in a paltry way, he imitates the laws."-Andre Lhote

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  13. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sidharth Chaturvedi View Post
    I'd just add that you don't necessary need specific brushes for different materials- you can get pretty far with a hard round. .
    Well yes, this is true, especially for concept work. But I'm afraid that when it comes to painting from life and making things look as natural as possible, different brushes are required, just like when painting with oils. I would suggest downloading Whit Brachna's Environment tutorial for further explanation of the concept.

    My personal favorite example of this is the painting that won the last Last Man Standing competition, which I think is one of the best technical executions the digital medium ever produced. artist: Cicinimo. (see round 4 image)

    Last edited by Goog; July 6th, 2010 at 04:48 PM.
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  15. #8
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    You have great proportions. It looks like you know how to get off to a great start. You have a good understanding of edges, values and shadow patterns. This is where the hard part begins. Good bye tip hello iceberg.

    -Some of your edges get real muddy.
    -Your still life arrangements are pretty uninspired. It's really helpful to have an arrangement you can take serious pride in.
    -I know the asaro head pretty well. You are missing some depth around the eyes. I think there is something missing from the cheeks.

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  17. #9
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    Your colours are good. I don't know if it's been mentioned but you need to pay more attention to edges.
    Hard, soft and lost edges. Right now almost all of your edges are soft.
    As a general rule, edges in light are hard and edges in shadow are soft or lost.

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  19. #10
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    Thanks everyone! these crits are so helpful, i should come here more often. I didnt know the thing about the edges!

    Ill be sure to thank all of your posts!

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