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    Frustrated

    Hey. I've asked this section of Conceptart.Org for help before. Every time I've asked, I've gotten the most insightful, useful and downright awesome advice anyone could ask for. To all of the people who have responded to the threads I've posted here, you are fantastic, you're gentlemen and scholars. I'm not posting here again to thank the people who have helped me in the past, though.

    Like I said, I've gotten the best advice imaginable, and none of it has ever helped me. I've never used it, I don't feel like I can use it. I can't think when I'm drawing or painting, I can't put any of this stuff into use. It's the most indescribable thing, it should be the most simple thing in the world to get over, but it hasn't been. I've been like this for about a year and a half.

    I don't know what you guys can do for me anymore, like I said, you've been awesome in the past and I haven't been able to use any of it, for no reason at all. At this point, I'm just feeling fuck all. I'm tired of being completely unable to use any of the stuff I'm told, I'm tired of not being able to visibly improve or think or learn or finish anything, I'm sick of all of it.

    I'm just going to leave this here. To all who respond, it's still great of you, but I don't think I can do anything anymore.

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    What's the probalem again? Are you having trouble keeping at it, or you're not seeing the change you want?

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    To put it into the words of a wise man:

    You rack disciprine!



    Seriously though, if you got a lot of advice before...why not use it. Think less and try harder. Right now you're stoping yourself from getting where you want to be because of the way you think. If you can't do something, try harder. Never, ever, give up!

    If you run into a brick wall, it's not there to stop you, but it's there for you to prove how much you want to reach the other side of that brick wall. Nothing can be gained without offering something of the same value in exchange. If you get angry and frustrated at yourself, it's good. Because your mind is trying to find a solution to the problem. Often the solution is right in front of you, but you can't or are not willing to see it.

    Study hard, re-read the advice everybody gave you and work with it. You have to motivate yourself and teach yourself the discipline needed to succeed, the rest of us can only guide you and watch what happens to you. No one is going to do the work for you, you have to do it yourself!

    EDIT:
    Read this post again, bcarman posted this answering your questions back in March. Seriously kid, stop being so hard on yourself. Give it some time. With time all can be achieved.

    Last edited by LostFayth; July 5th, 2010 at 10:12 AM.
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    It's very difficult to explain, Rainville. It's not really a single problem at all, I sit down to draw and all of a sudden, nothing seems right. Everything I've ever learned about art becomes forfeit. That's not very helpful, but that's as far as I can think to describe it.

    You've got an incredible sketchbook, by the way. The latest post is impressively better than the post preceding it. That woman in black and white, the one with wild hair and no pupils or irises? I really like the way it looks, even unfinished as she is.

    Yeah, LostFayth, I'm not very disciplined. That one of my worst flaws, good eye. I probably should have been drawing instead of posting this thread, anyway. I draw a lot, but I don't draw hard. I get frustrated ten minutes in and go onto something different.

    Another great sketchbook, by the way. Your stuff in pen is very impressive, those horns, deer and squirrels. You crosshatch excellently.

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    Sounds like you're being too precious about everything. Scribble, and I mean really scribble - make a big mess and have some fun doing it. Forget about making anything serious until you can scribble away happily for at least an hour. Then have a good laugh at what you've drawn. Come back in a month.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Okay, so you get pissed up quickly at yourself or at what you're drawing....lemme ask you this: Do you draw in your room/inside of your house a lot and by yourself? I wanna bet you do. If you keep yourself isolated in your room and force yourself to draw it's not gonna work. It's like forcing yourself to act spontaneous...that's never gonna work.

    The discipline thing is what you should work on. You have to teach yourself, or seek help trough someone who really is willing to teach you, that all comes in time. It dominates our life but we all forget to include it into our life. For instance, you're seventeen right? You want to draw like the greatest of artists out there, but you want to it NOW. Remember yourself that they weren't born with a God given gift, but they also had to work hard for it. You should to. I read in someones signature that "good artists are the crappy artists that never gave up". You'd do well to remember that.

    That said, find someone who shared the same interests with you art wise and draw together. You'll keep each other motivated. If it's not possible to do so you need to motivate yourself. For instance, if I draw 30 heads with features and paint 5 of em in grayscale I'm allowed an ice cream. Rewards work really well in order to motivate yourself.

    Go outside and draw/paint. It's almost summer. Enjoy the weather, visit a museum, go on a holiday trip and bring your sketchbook along anywhere you go. The first step is to learn yourself that you can draw anything and it's okay to fail. This will take time. See, the magic word again, time. Every time you fail you're one step closer in achieving your goal, unless you give up. So, don't give up.

    I feel for you....I've been there where you are right now. I guess a lot of the people here on the board have. What kept us going is the drive to get better, even though it means you have to fail 50 times to succeed in the end. Keep going on, and, above all, enjoy life. Don't let yourself be down because you can't draw well, yet. If you truly want to become an artist, you will become one. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, maybe it'll come to you when you're in your twenties, but hey, it'll come.

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    Hey Basham.. In my experience, frustration is just that little platform you land on right before you're about to make a breakthrough if you stick to it and keep going. Its a state of progress. If you feel that you're lacking discipline, or getting frustrated after only 10 minutes, then you should probably just look into a change of environment or medium... ( temporarily.. to keep your mind fresh )that usually helps for me when i feel the way you're feeling...

    And btw. I looked into your sketchbook, and you're improving.. so go look at that if you're "in doubt" about your ability to pick up advice and improve. You should just keep drawing what makes you happy, and keep mixing that up with studies and you'll improve a lot in little time.. I'll try to be more specific in your sketchbook IF you update it again and you don't give up keep going man!

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    Jesus, there are a lot of really skilled people in this thread.

    I'll get to that scribbling the next time I sit down to draw, Spot. That latest work in progress is coming along nicely, by the way, I can't wait to see it when it's finished.

    Actually, I'm still sixteen, Fayth. Will be until August. I've got a couple artists friends, but I'm kind of uncomfortable drawing with them. They're a lot more skilled than I am and a few are even younger than I am. I'll find a way to discipline myself.

    Dile. Dile, Dile, Dile. There is nothing more amazing than watching someone improve as much as you have. I'll post something in my sketchbook as soon as I've made something worth posting, I've been flooding the thing with doodles.

    I need to stop coming here whenever I feel down, I've asked you guys for advice enough times.

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    One of my favorite art teacher once said: "Frustration is ineptitude leaving the body". The road to being good is a long and hard one. It's not possible to go from noob to a master with in 2 month or even 6 month or even a year. Every artist that's good from Hannes(algenfleger) to Marko Djurdjevic, from Jonathan Hardesty(Mindcandyman) to Jason Chan all at one point sucked. They all became good was through intense practice over a long period of time. Feeling frustrated and hopeless is completely natural and something every artist experiences from time to time, but its more important to have drive and dedication not to give up. From the look of your sketch book, you need to slow down and take your time. Be patient, even Marko Djurdjevic takes at least 1.5 hours to sketch out a character and Marko is probably one of the fastest artist in the industry. Ultimately realize that you are not racing against anyone else to be better except your self. If you worked hard there is no reason why you can't be good at it.

    "He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast." -Leonardo da Vinci

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    Quote Originally Posted by Basham View Post
    Dile. Dile, Dile, Dile. There is nothing more amazing than watching someone improve as much as you have. I'll post something in my sketchbook as soon as I've made something worth posting, I've been flooding the thing with doodles.

    I need to stop coming here whenever I feel down, I've asked you guys for advice enough times.
    Giving complements is fine, but take complements as well. Dile said you are improving, and you are.

    You say he improved a lot and you like seeing the progress he made. He made it by working his ass off. His sketchbook dates back to March 06. So work hard and study hard and in four years from now, you will be Dile #2. Can you see what I'm getting at with my time thing. Put things into perspective

    Oh, it's a sketchbook, not a master piece book. Your sketchbook is there to fuck around in. Try things out, experiment, document the world around you, develop ideas....that's what a sketchbook is about. Even an online one. Throw everything you have into it. Your progress will be documented in it

    Asking for advice isn't a bad thing. There are a lot of people asking for advice and other giving advice. The important thing is what you do with it. Use the advice given and you'll make us happy.


    Am I sounding too much like Elwell?....

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    Since I've made these threads before I know it's hard to hear vague advice, as good as it may be. So here are some tangible things to try (any or all);

    1. Do a study of something from observation, then sketch out that same type of subject from imagination. Do a nude drawing or two, then put away the refs and do a few nude poses. Since the info you just processed from doing that study is still fresh, it will help you make certain connections.

    2. Slow down (I also posted this in your sb) it seems you're really concerned with filling up space. Be concerned with doing a thorough job in understanding what you're drawing. This doesn't mean a fully rendered image on each page, but the sketches you do should have coherent lines and structure. It's also easy to remember that light lines go down first to help nail the structure, then the "true" lines, the dark ones representing the outside of figures. Change your focus; don't worry about the number of pages you put away, worry about doing a good job and understanding things.

    3. Switch gears. Illustration isn't only about drawing people. It's about drawing places and things, animals and plants. Leave people behind for the moment and draw a lot of dogs, or some houses. If you live near nature, you can kill 2 birds with one stone (a change of drawing environment and subject) by taking a hike and drawking plants and leaves. It seems silly but foliage and the patterns they create are some of the hardest things to get right (at least for me).

    4. Have fun. Some of the most inspiring and helpful subjects are ones that don't really have much to do with "study" but play. Creating a world then imagining its people (ala tabletop rpg type stuff) is one of ym favorite things to do, and it's led to some of my best art and projects. What do you like? Video games? Think of a neat idea for a game and make some characters. Space exploration? Think of the future of humanity and the neat stuff we'll need to do it. On the way you'll probably need to look at existing artwork and a lot of references. You'll be having fun and getting better without realising it.

    5. Try to join regular study activities or complete previous ones. Head to the mentoring section and see what's going on. Even if you're not accepted into a thread, you can still follow along on your own and do what they do. Structure I find really helps in making a commitment.


    Hope some of that helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Basham View Post
    Like I said, I've gotten the best advice imaginable, and none of it has ever helped me. I've never used it, I don't feel like I can use it. I can't think when I'm drawing or painting, I can't put any of this stuff into use. It's the most indescribable thing, it should be the most simple thing in the world to get over, but it hasn't been. I've been like this for about a year and a half.
    You have my sympathy: I have always had that exact same problem. Part of it is of course that one often gets conflicting advice: two artists are both equally brilliant, and artist number one tells you to do one thing while artist number two tells you the exact opposite, and both of them insist their method is the only one that works!

    And I think I know what you mean with being unable to follow any of the advice. When I draw, a sort of mesmeric thing sets in: I find it impossible to both draw AND analyse HOW I am doing what I do. I lose track of time and space, and then my drawing either works out or it doesn't, and I have no idea why.

    I have sort of given up on asking for any advice. None of it has ever helped me. I suspect there simply isn't a one-size-fits-all solution to how to learn. The only thing that has ever helped me in the least has been to grimly plod along, trying out various approaches, styles and mediums. For what it's worth, looking at your sketches, it doesn't look to me like you are doing too badly. I couldn't draw like that when I was your age. I only started out as adult, and after more than twenty years of grim plodding I am not far beyond where you are, if at all.

    So my advice is to ignore the advice, and have some fun drawing.

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    Thumbs up

    To Basham: Read the big words in my sig. Read the "Fuck Yeah thread". And for goodness sake, you are only 16. Or 17.

    Quote Originally Posted by brianvds View Post
    I only started out as adult, and after more than twenty years of grim plodding I am not far beyond where you are, if at all.
    Oh yeah? And during these 20 years, did you draw every day, or twice every year? Do you follow a structure to learning and constantly seek improvement, or do you just doodle stuff aimlessly? Do you draw from life or from imagination? Did you spend 99% of your time thinking about what to study and spent the 1% of the time on actual drawing?


    Btw, thanks to D.Align for posting the link to Hanne's (Algenpfleger) SB. Definitely some of the most shocking improvement I've seen and a super inspiration too!

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    Oh how many times i have been there, and i am still drawing and painting, so relax and enjoy

    M

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    Here's a funny little graph i found in Marc Dalessio's blog.

    Usually, improvement is pretty much dependant on you finding a practical solution to your practical problem. Don't focus so much on how you feel about your self. Rationalize.

    What helped me out the most on this site, was not asking people for advice. I constantly asked my self questions like: How can I learn the most effectively how (to draw) *insert subject/theory*

    Also, some of the sketchbooks worked more like documents of the artist's journey, as they would post studies and pieces on a daily basis. It was clear to see how and why they were progressing so rapidly, and in 10 out of 10 cases, they were learning by doing. And more importantly, they were learning by doing the right thing, over and over untill they got it right.



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    I can appreciate if you're feeling frustrated, like the advice you've been giving isn't yielding results, but I'm afraid improving as an artist isn't like trying to bake a better cake.

    First and foremost, all the tips and tricks you read about are designed to be implemented as you encounter them in your work. For example, keeping composition, perspective and proportion in mind are all good.. but if you're unfamiliar with all of these things and try desperately to make them all work together, you only end up frustrating yourself.

    See, challenging yourself is always good, but I think the one piece of advice we really fail to give to other artists is that you need to be ENJOYING what you're doing. If you're not having fun, you probably don't want to continue what you're doing... and then all the advice in the world isn't going to help when you're no longer drawing.

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    I can get this same feeling sometimes. I've learnt so much the past years when I've been immersing myself in art information, yet sometimes when I draw I feel like I'm just as bad as I was four years ago. I don't vary the pressure of my pencil at all, I don't think of form and three-dimensionality in my drawings etc. I guess what you and me both need to do is SLOW DOWN. You say you can't think when you're drawing. Sometimes I feel like this too. I just keep going, churning out crappy drawings. What I need to do then is take a breather and draw slower than what feels natural. Stop to think. Don't go on auto-pilot. Try it. Be conscious about slowing down when you notice that you've switched over to autopilot. Then when you get into the flow again, auto-pilot, and inspiration, can kick in again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    To Basham: Read the big words in my sig.
    I second that.

    Oh yeah? And during these 20 years, did you draw every day, or twice every year?
    Having a full time job, and studying part time for much of the time, and trying to juggle several other hobbies as well, inevitably meant having relatively little time for drawing. I tried to put in a few sessions at least once or twice a week.

    Do you follow a structure to learning and constantly seek improvement, or do you just doodle stuff aimlessly?
    Much of what I did now strikes me as having been idle doodling. Proper art instruction is all but non-existent here where I live: there are few art teachers, they are expensive so that I cannot afford them anyway, and most of them have no clue what they are doing. I had no idea at all of how to go about it, and spent many years in futile attempts to draw from reference photos.

    Do you draw from life or from imagination?
    See above: I did what many classical artists now tell me is just about the worst thing one can do: try to copy photos. But of course, I didn't know that at the time! Some years ago I finally discovered more sensible ways to do it on the web, and since then my work has greatly improved, although it is still pretty amateurish.

    But I still do a full time job, and I am still trying to fit in time for several other hobbies, so this inevitably puts limits on what one can realistically hope to achieve. I suspect that like it or not, talent also puts a certain limit on what one can achieve, and I have no particular talent for visual art.

    I have heard it said that it takes about ten thousand hours of practice to achieve competency in any field. If you work on it full time, you can put in that much practice in a few years. If you are a part-time amateur like me, it can take decades.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brianvds View Post
    Having a full time job, and studying part time for much of the time, and trying to juggle several other hobbies as well, inevitably meant having relatively little time for drawing. I tried to put in a few sessions at least once or twice a week.
    I see what your problem is. Considering that the full-time job alone is taking up nearly all your non-sleeping time, then throwing several hobbies + sleeping time + misc activities = no time for art.

    If you want to get better at art, you need to amend your life (if art is more important than the other several hobbies, then dump those).
    If not, you'll progress at a super-slow pace. It depends on the individual and what one wants to achieve etc.

    Although it's true that people with "more talent" progress at a much faster pace than the average joe like myself, if you work hard, you'll still improve a lot at your own pace.

    Copying from photos is only good if you use that as aids to help you interpret drawing from life, because drawing from life can be very challenging sometimes. People also used to tell me stuff like "Don't copy the subject". I didn't understood what that meant, but now I think I do. That sentence can be re-phrased as "Don't copy the subject BLINDLY". Because if you follow every line and contour blindly and get that on paper, you're not learning anything, other than maybe your eye accuracy. It won't help you draw anything from imagination or when the subject is not around.
    I've been doing blind copying for the past 8 months or so but I'm now changing that. I now realize that by copying and drawing blindly, you can be drawing for 40 years and still can't draw a thing at the end of the day.

    My motto now is : See, interpret and think, then draw.

    You don't really need art teachers too. Books, DVDs and youtube videos and CA can teach you a lot. I used to think school + teachers = a must for learning drawing but it depends on what kind of teachers or school you have. Get into a bad school or a teacher who can't teach well, or both = WORSE.

    That 10000 hour theory is only a guideline. I believe some need 20000, and I definitely need 40000+. The thing is keep pressing on.

    Good day,
    Xeon

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    You're only 16.


    Think about it this way: There are lots of people out there who don't even discover that art/drawing is their passion until they're several DECADES older than you are now. Think about how much of a head start you have and how lucky you are to have the opportunity to get started working hard and making progress while you're still young and ahead of the game.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    If you want to get better at art, you need to amend your life (if art is more important than the other several hobbies, then dump those).
    Alas, they are ALL important to me. I have never been able to stick to only one thing. I quickly get bored and start missing all the others! But that is okay with me now; I no longer have unrealistic expectations. It's not like I urgently need to make money with art or anything like that. I'll probably end up as post-impressionist, for which one does not need to be able to draw like Michelangelo. But it doesn't hurt to develop at least some marginal skills.

    Although it's true that people with "more talent" progress at a much faster pace than the average joe like myself, if you work hard, you'll still improve a lot at your own pace.
    Indeed, though I suspect that there are things that, without talent, you'll never learn. In my case, great complexity is one of those things, e.g. complex foliage, or the patterns of spots on a leopard - with that sort of thing I very rapidly lose track of which leaf or spot I am working on. There are of course ways to simplify and work around that problem. But it also means that some forms of ultra-realism will almost certainly forever be beyond me.

    Copying from photos is only good if you use that as aids to help you interpret drawing from life, because drawing from life can be very challenging sometimes. People also used to tell me stuff like "Don't copy the subject". I didn't understood what that meant, but now I think I do. That sentence can be re-phrased as "Don't copy the subject BLINDLY". Because if you follow every line and contour blindly and get that on paper, you're not learning anything, other than maybe your eye accuracy.
    I think accuracy is quite important (one will never learn portraits without accuracy!) but you are right: one must be careful not to get too obsessed with it at the expense of expression. Precise accuracy is another thing I sort of gave up on. I think I quite simply don't have the eye for it. But I notice that now that I am relaxing and not obsessing over it so much anymore, I have actually become slightly more accurate than I was.

    I've been doing blind copying for the past 8 months or so but I'm now changing that. I now realize that by copying and drawing blindly, you can be drawing for 40 years and still can't draw a thing at the end of the day.
    Yes, I know what you mean, it is frustrating if one cannot work from one's imagination. It is important too, because otherwise you remain limited to only what you can directly observe. Even if you do fine art landscapes or still life, you might not have everything in front of you that you need for a satisfactory result. For example, one might want to put little figures into a landscape, and if you can sketch them from your head they might look far more spontaneous and expressive than if you have to run around finding a suitable reference photo.

    You don't really need art teachers too. Books, DVDs and youtube videos and CA can teach you a lot. I used to think school + teachers = a must for learning drawing but it depends on what kind of teachers or school you have. Get into a bad school or a teacher who can't teach well, or both = WORSE.
    Very true. These days there are plenty of charlatans out there giving art lessons, and then it turns out you can draw better than they can! Then it is better to learn from nature itself, and from the old masters - I have been doing lots of copying after master art works from the past, and it seems to be a very good exercise. It is also very satisfying, because not only does it teach me something about art, it also greatly improves my understanding and appreciation of the old masters.

    That 10000 hour theory is only a guideline. I believe some need 20000, and I definitely need 40000+.
    Well, I don't know, I have looked over your blog and you seem to have that spark that one needs for this. You're especially good at abstracting things into simple shapes, e.g. seeing the invisible boxes around a car and then putting the car into those boxes in correct perspective. With much practice over the years I have become reasonably decent at drawing what I see, but I remain mystified as to how people do that thing with the boxes and cylinders. Whenever I try that I end up with a completely wrong drawing! :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amarok View Post
    You're only 16.

    ... Think about how much of a head start you have and how lucky you are to have the opportunity to get started working hard and making progress while you're still young and ahead of the game.
    Ah hindsight. If only I had listened to advice like that when I was 16-- I'd be an astronaut by now. And the president... at the very least a better artist.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanya View Post
    See, challenging yourself is always good, but I think the one piece of advice we really fail to give to other artists is that you need to be ENJOYING what you're doing. If you're not having fun, you probably don't want to continue what you're doing... and then all the advice in the world isn't going to help when you're no longer drawing.
    This.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Basham View Post
    Hey. I've asked this section of Conceptart.Org for help before. Every time I've asked, I've gotten the most insightful, useful and downright awesome advice anyone could ask for. To all of the people who have responded to the threads I've posted here, you are fantastic, you're gentlemen and scholars. I'm not posting here again to thank the people who have helped me in the past, though.

    Like I said, I've gotten the best advice imaginable, and none of it has ever helped me. I've never used it, I don't feel like I can use it. I can't think when I'm drawing or painting, I can't put any of this stuff into use. It's the most indescribable thing, it should be the most simple thing in the world to get over, but it hasn't been. I've been like this for about a year and a half.

    I don't know what you guys can do for me anymore, like I said, you've been awesome in the past and I haven't been able to use any of it, for no reason at all. At this point, I'm just feeling fuck all. I'm tired of being completely unable to use any of the stuff I'm told, I'm tired of not being able to visibly improve or think or learn or finish anything, I'm sick of all of it.

    I'm just going to leave this here. To all who respond, it's still great of you, but I don't think I can do anything anymore.
    I think if you look at your own words you can find your problems

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diarum View Post
    I think if you look at your own words you can find your problems
    Bullseyes for Diarum.

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    I can't believe this got so many responses. You guys are awesome, for your wisdom and your willingness to put up with my foolishness. It's a little hard to read some of this, realizing how foolish some of the things I said in the opening post are, but that's something I'll have to get over. This career does not support an ego.

    Thanks.

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    LOL, Diarum has started to become a counselor at CA!

    Seriously, Basham, I just went to your livejournal blog and your drawings ain't bad at all! At least you're somewhere now. You just need to change your way of drawing and very likely, you will then start to see the light. It may be hard in the beginning especially if you've been copying blindly for the past 20 years, but keep at it, be serious, and you'll see something.

    I'll check over your blog every now and then! The thing is : Not everyone can persevere for 20 years at drawing with average results and still keep at it. You're another new inspiration for me!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    Seriously, Basham, I just went to your livejournal blog and your drawings ain't bad at all! At least you're somewhere now. You just need to change your way of drawing and very likely, you will then start to see the light. It may be hard in the beginning especially if you've been copying blindly for the past 20 years, but keep at it, be serious, and you'll see something.

    I'll check over your blog every now and then! The thing is : Not everyone can persevere for 20 years at drawing with average results and still keep at it. You're another new inspiration for me!
    I think you mean me; I'm the one with the Livejournal blog. Thanks for the kind comments. Never thought I'd become an inspiration to anyone!

    But don't think it is perseverance. That would be like a heroin addict saying that he's persevered with his drug thing for years and years, against all odds. In my case it's been pretty much an addiction. At various points I got so frustrated that I made a conscious decision to give it up. Alas, within a week or two I would be sitting in a boring meeting at work and find myself scribbling drawings and then I would be at it all over again. Too late to try quitting now. ;-)

    Perhaps I should do what you did and what I see lots of others here did, and start a Conceptart sketchbook. Not sure I'll have the time to regularly update it though. For one thing, because of personal circumstances I can usually get around to art only every second week, which is partly why my progress is so slow and plodding.

    Anyway, we'll see what happens. I'm glad I stumbled upon Conceptart. I used to hang out on WetCanvas, but I think the standard of art here is in general vastly higher, the board isn't so paralyzed by prudish and politically correct moderators that look over your shoulder all the time, and the blunt and honest comments one gets here are a refreshing change from the fawning praise for even the crappiest of work that one often sees on other boards. That kind of thing is marvelous for the ego but does one's work no good.

    I am usually not exactly the worst artist on the boards I hang out on. Here on Conceptart I am so way out of my league that I was actually scared to join. I gasped, and then did the required clicking, so here I am, occupying the very lowest rungs on the artistic ladder in this community. Terrifying, sheer hell on my fragile ego. And probably the very best thing that can happen to my work at this point. :-)

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    Huh, I used to hang out at WetCanvas too. I suppose the big difference is that they're aimed at the hobbyist market, and this place has a bit more of a slant toward the aspiring (or active) professional. I got the impression that there was a bit of an older demographic over there as well, so that might make a difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brianvds View Post
    I think you mean me; I'm the one with the Livejournal blog. Thanks for the kind comments. Never thought I'd become an inspiration to anyone!
    Oh yeah, I meant you.

    Too late to try quitting now. ;-)
    That's the spirit you must have! I always tell myself the same thing : been at this for 10 - 11 months (compared to your 20 years) and it's too late to turn back.

    Perhaps I should do what you did and what I see lots of others here did, and start a Conceptart sketchbook. Not sure I'll have the time to regularly update it though. For one thing, because of personal circumstances I can usually get around to art only every second week, which is partly why my progress is so slow and plodding.
    You should start a SB here in addition to your blog and watch your SB grow!

    Anyway, we'll see what happens. I'm glad I stumbled upon Conceptart. I used to hang out on WetCanvas, but I think the standard of art here is in general vastly higher, the board isn't so paralyzed by prudish and politically correct moderators that look over your shoulder all the time, and the blunt and honest comments one gets here are a refreshing change from the fawning praise for even the crappiest of work that one often sees on other boards. That kind of thing is marvelous for the ego but does one's work no good.
    I used to join WetCanvas but the forums there are too huge and cluttered and messy. Most of the stuff there are more of the hobbyist level, while most of the stuff here at CA are industry-level.

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