Any advice in designing scifi guns?
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    Question Any advice in designing scifi guns?

    Heeellllloooooooo!!!


    I've been tasked with designed some scifi guns for two seperate species/races/factions and I'm having a LOAD of trouble with it.

    I've tried to use the styles from the creatures, one being bulky and hard, and the other sleek. But it's still too difficult for me.

    Even though I design the two seperate guns seperately they still look very similar. Besides that, I'm just generally having a lot of trouble with them.

    Is there any particular thing I should try and follow when designing weapons/guns for alien races?

    Or could you part with any great wisdom?

    Thanks!!!

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    To all Concept artists:

    STOP drawing guns that look like the offspring of an H&K P-90 and a Dyson vacuum cleaner!

    Just, please. . . stop. . . (in the voice inflection of William Shatner).

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    Hk p90 looks like the halo gun

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    "Life itself is your teacher, and you are in a state of constant learning." -Bruce Lee

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    "Any advice in designing scifi guns?"

    Short Answer:
    Look at lots of real guns.

    Longer Answer:
    The key to designing almost anything (or really, even drawing anything) is to start with a really good research session. The more information you fill your brain with, the more material you have to work with. If you have the potential to be a decent designer, this should start your gears turning. Maybe the magazine from that gun, combined with the barrel of that other gun... or maybe if the sight was made bigger and moved there... etc.

    When you get in the habit of making good visual research, you start building an internal library of interesting elements that you can work with. Then you can start getting REALLY creative. Then the process might be more like: Oh that part kind of looks like a fin to me, so maybe I'll make it one. What if the whole design was inspired by sea life? Maybe the bayonettes could be carved to look like swordfish. Or maybe it would look cool with some elements that look like those old machine parts I was looking at last week. Hmm, that trip to Home Depot spent just looking at power tools gave me lots of interesting shapes to think of...

    It's really hard to just make stuff up completely out of your head. It's much smarter and easier to borrow elements and use them in interesting and hopefully unique ways, and it will give your designs the authority of looking like things we've seen before, and thus look more convincing.

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    OmenSpirits is offline Commercial-Illustrator in-training, NOT an artist. Level 13 Gladiator: Retiarius
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    "Any advice in designing scifi guns?"

    Short Answer:
    Look at lots of real guns.

    Longer Answer:
    The key to designing almost anything (or really, even drawing anything) is to start with a really good research session. The more information you fill your brain with, the more material you have to work with. If you have the potential to be a decent designer, this should start your gears turning. Maybe the magazine from that gun, combined with the barrel of that other gun... or maybe if the sight was made bigger and moved there... etc.

    When you get in the habit of making good visual research, you start building an internal library of interesting elements that you can work with. Then you can start getting REALLY creative. Then the process might be more like: Oh that part kind of looks like a fin to me, so maybe I'll make it one. What if the whole design was inspired by sea life? Maybe the bayonettes could be carved to look like swordfish. Or maybe it would look cool with some elements that look like those old machine parts I was looking at last week. Hmm, that trip to Home Depot spent just looking at power tools gave me lots of interesting shapes to think of...

    It's really hard to just make stuff up completely out of your head. It's much smarter and easier to borrow elements and use them in interesting and hopefully unique ways, and it will give your designs the authority of looking like things we've seen before, and thus look more convincing.
    DID you use the 'R' word?


    R-r-r-r-rr-r-r-r-r-rr-eeee--aaaa---serch?

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    If it was me, I might:

    1. Look at a lot of real guns of all varieties from all different periods (especially necessary since I know squat about guns...)

    2. Look at various design styles from different periods and cultures to get ideas for a possible look-and-feel for the guns.

    3. Apply style inspiration to something reasonably gun-like based on whatever I've learned about guns, and see what comes out of the mess.

    If it's supposed to be two totally different cultures, I'd probably try to pick totally different sources of style inspiration for each culture... So, I might decide that for Culture 1 I'll look at a mix of Zhou-dynasty Chinese art, ancient Syrian art, and ancient Cambodian architecture; and then for Culture 2 I'll look at Art Deco, Constructivism, and Bauhaus. Or something.

    Cultural and design sources of inspiration are just an example, of course. You can do the same with other sources of inspiration, too - pick a bunch of totally different inspiration sources for each. For example maybe look at plant-forms and fungi for Culture 1, and all kinds of machinery for Culture 2, or whatever.

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