I don't understand
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  1. #1
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    I don't understand

    At the moment I am doing an Interactive Media Course in the UK. Good News is every hour im awake i draw even if im sitting down eating which is just plain rude i know But yeah, the bad news is, I have no money, no job after sending out over 50 professionally done CV's ive worked in a private hospital at the age of 18, I am a good labourer because i am strong. However luck just isnt good. I really want to start working in the art industry/entertainment industry and te big problem is after i research what i need to do im back to this point of being confused. I am not sure what i am asking but i suppose i need help understanding the buisiness of art and how to grab some pennys from it!

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    I hope to be the best i can be... nothing less

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    Um.......

    Ok, that post is a bit confusing. I'm not trying to be facetious but the first piece of advice I would give you is to proofread what you write so that it makes sense to others. It's hard for people to help when they don't understand the question.

    But I think you are asking how to make money making art?

    There is no real answer for this. Art is not like becoming a doctor or an engineer. In those professions, as long as you passed the classes you can charge people money for your services, but in art, it is entirely based on your talent and connections.

    So my advice is simple, buy books on business and read them. Buy DVD's or downloads from CA about art and business and watch them. Find a local successful artist and see if you can talk to him about it. Read art magazines that talk about practical things and not about how someone used piss to paint with.

    Draw and paint until you can honestly say that your skills are professional grade, and then submit your stuff to your chosen field for review.

    Keep a list of everyone in the art field that you talk to.

    And after all of that, shake some maracas, find a 4 leaf clover, cross your fingers, knock on wood, or whatever else you think will help.

    Unlike a lot of other professions, there is no guarantee that you will make any money from your art, but doing the things above will increase your chances.

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  4. #3
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    you're young is all, dont give up.

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    Please don't take this the wrong way, OP, but your post is really hard to understand. To be honest, when I read through your post, at first I thought that English must not be your native language, until I saw what country you were from.

    All other things aside, I think that communication skills and proper English are important things in business, too--if your English is similar to what it's like on this post on your CV/resume and cover letters that you submit to employers, do you think that they understand what you're trying to say, or that you come across as a capable adult? Chances are good that your writing comes across as pretty incomprehensible, unfortunately.

    Presenting yourself is kind of a "package deal" thing, so don't neglect the importance of being able to communicate yourself to employers in a way that's correct and easy for them to understand. It can only help you!

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    I'm just getting into the theatre business. You'd recommend CA's business tips for that as well?

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    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    Well the short answer is you have to be better than the people that you are trying to replace. It doesn't matter how young or willing you are; all that matters is your ability and your price. When you offer your services for a price you have to have an ability that is worth the risk someone will take hiring you.
    The great thing about art is it doesn't matter if you have a degree or who you know or anything like that, if you have the skills someone wants, they will pay you money to produce for them. If you don't they won't hire you.

    I was in the art department at LucasFilm Games when Iain McCaig applied for a job there. Of course everyone who saw his portfolio said you have to hire this guy right away before some other company does and the head of the department who wasn't an artist was kind of shocked and actually said. "We're Lucas Film we don't need anybody" and everybody pretty much told him no, this guy is special ( Iain draws better than God) and we would be foolish to let him go anywhere else. So he got hired over literally hundreds of applicants. Even at Lucas which has some of the most talented people in the world, Iain's talent was apparent and stood out.

    My point being that other artists recognise talent and want it, so you have to be the best you can be; 'cause you will never know who you are competing with when you go for a job. Another good artist makes their job easier, a lousy one makes it harder.
    So what are you doing to make your skills and portfolio better because that is what you should be working on.

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    Hey Tom, just checked out the sketchbook. The simple answer is: you're just not there yet.

    Just keep going.


    Robert - I work in theater. What do you want to know?

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