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  1. #1
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    New here. Looking for something.

    Sorry if this is in the wrong place.
    I've been looking around for quite some time and was wondering if there was anything about basics of art.
    Sort of like, a beginners guide.
    Any explanation of type of paper, pencils to use, ink, color, ect..
    Also basics and what would be good to learn.
    And I've been a lot of people say "studies",
    what does this mean?

    So if anyone could point me in the direction of some of those answers or have any tips, feel free to post.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.

    Thankyou.

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  2. #2
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    Google "Andrew Loomis" or "Glenn Vilppu", or better yet both. Or go pick up a copy of Betty Edwards' <i>Drawing On the Right Side Of the Brain</i>. They all cover the basics.

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    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
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  3. #3
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    "Or go pick up a copy of Betty Edwards' <i>Drawing On the Right Side Of the Brain</i>"

    It's chock full of pseudoscience and marginally working misapplied exercises. Avoid Edwards; it's a scam aimed at fooling you into thinking you improved quick.

    I'd stick with Loomis or even Walter Foster booklets, but not Edwards.

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  4. #4
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    thankyou for the replys!
    And after the other night i've been looking at loomis for some time and drawing some things based on the that.

    Also,
    as I asked before, what does "studies" mean?

    Thankyou.

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  5. #5
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    Thumbs up

    Erm, actually, Edwards' book is the perfect cure if you're one of those beginners (like myself) who draw what you think you should see, or what you think the subject should be. It kinds of forces you into the mindset of "draw what you see".

    However, that said, once you got past that, Edwards' book will become more of a hindrance than an aid, so when that time comes, it's time to read other books.

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeon_OND View Post
    Erm, actually, Edwards' book is the perfect cure if you're one of those beginners (like myself) who draw what you think you should see, or what you think the subject should be. It kinds of forces you into the mindset of "draw what you see".

    However, that said, once you got past that, Edwards' book will become more of a hindrance than an aid, so when that time comes, it's time to read other books.
    I agree, that's exactly what she's for. Pretty much sounds like what the OP requested, eh?

    To the OP, a study is when you concentrate on individual elements of a subject, like pieces of anatomy, parts of a landcape, still life drawings, etc., that aren't intended to be completed pieces. Often they're done while preparing to do a finished piece, and you're studying the elements before committing to the final version.

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    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
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  7. #7
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    Here's a good, quick online overview of a lot of that. It's always good to learn from multiple sources, so that's just one more to add to the previously listed books.

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    Thankyou to all for the help.

    And thankyou for the explanation of a study Nezumi.

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  9. #9
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    I'f you're drawing, get some drawing paper(there are different kinds of paper). The quality can make a big difference in the end result of a drawing, and quality will also make learning more or less difficult.
    I prefer to go with the brand Strathmore; Drawing; Medium. It has good endurance, isn't too thick or too thin, and you can trace if you have a lightbox or something if you need to as well.
    If you're an absolute Beginner, I would suggest learning Perspective one point to five point perspect, learn about light and shade, and learn about basic proportions; start with some human anatomy(bones and muscle structures).
    It's difficult for someone to help themself or to help someone without knowing where they are at to start with, and where they want to go.
    1. Find an awkward shaped mechanical object (like a bike pump although any intimidating object will do) and spend about an hour and a half drawing it, any paper and drawing tool will do. Then if you want, post it online or tuck it away somewhere you'll be able to find it in a few months...
    2. You need to know what kind of art you want to be able to do, not necessarily end up doing, but what you want to have the technical skills,knowledge, and ability to be able to do. Find some illustrations of Artwork that seems to really have the perspectice thing down, another for anatomy, and another for light and shade. You may or may not like them later but let's see what you like anyways, you don't even have to like them, as long as they match that description.

    The reason I chose those three things: Perspective, Light and shade, and Proportion. is because they all supplement eachother. not necesarily proportion, but it's a good thing to know if you're going to be drawing anything other than still lifes.

    Edit: Also, Studies are finding an object or image, and trying to draw it as you see it. great way to learn anatomical structures, and light and shade.
    Betty Edwards' Drawing On the Right Side Of the Brain Is a good book as well, Most University or College level Introduction to drawing courses are now more or less based off of that book. It sort of changed the way drawing is taught from what I hear.

    Last edited by Mr_S_14; June 16th, 2010 at 05:31 PM.
    ~"With a little hope, and alot of try, anything is possible."~
    ~"The harder You work, the better life gets."~
    ~"The pain doesn't last, but the gain will last forever."~
    ~"Fear is my courage." ~Mr_S_14
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