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  1. #1
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    Yup - Featuring figure reference project

    My project right now is human figure templates for 3D modeling. I'm working on the front view, then I will move on to the back and side views. And that would just be the male; I'll want to make a female reference later. And all this without while lacking actual art training (I'm really a science major). I guess I have my work cut out for me.

    At the end I also threw in one of my cartoony pieces, which I actually did before I started learning real anatomy, but I want to show off stuff like that anyway.

    Update
    Cat picture put in to make this thread look better in thead list.
    http://conceptart.org/forums/showpos...2&postcount=17

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    Last edited by VideroBoy; July 25th, 2010 at 04:35 PM. Reason: Added cat to make thread preview prettier.
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  3. #2
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    You can learn a great deal about anatomy, and figure drawing on this site, as well as tutorials, and other resources all over the web.
    If you want to learn even more, draw from life. If you can't find a figure drawing class in your area, draw yourself, friends, and family.
    I think you have a good start, learning about the structure first. When I first started taking figure classes, I knew little to nothing about the construction, or underlying structure. So, needless to say, those early classes didn't help me much. It was only recently that I really feel I've got a little understanding of the structure of the human figure.
    Good luck with your project!
    ~Zombifried

    "Try not. Do or do not!! There is no try"
    -Yoda, The Empire Strikes Back

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    Thanks. I've been using Andrew Loomis, Jack Hamm, and some muscle anatomy references I found on the Internet for my project. If I've made a mistake let me know.

    I think the part I'm most unsure about is the front of the knee, and to a lesser extent the outside of the elbow. It's a rather abstract structure to me.

    Funny that you mentioned drawing classes. I've actually been taking night classes for about a month now, and last Monday (one class per week) we were first introduced to a live model. In the attached photos, the first picture was ten-fifteen second gestures, the next three were thirty-odd second gestures, and the next five were the model actually holding a pose for a manageable length of time.

    It's an introductory class, so there wasn't any discussion about how to construct the figure. The instruction has been more about using lines, tone, cross-contour, and a little bit of composition. Before last Monday the most common thing we had to draw were still lives of cloth piles.

    I've been finding myself just drawing the outlines when drawing from life anyway. I've only turned to using construction lines, shapes, etc. when drawing from my imagination. Should I worry about this?

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    Last edited by VideroBoy; July 3rd, 2010 at 06:33 PM.
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  6. #4
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    Whether your drawing from life, imagination, or any other reference, you should use construction techniques.The outline (contour) should come last.
    The knee and elbow can be simplified into round forms (spheres), or an upside down (points toward the lower leg) triangle for the front of the knee. As time permits, you can refine these and other shapes after you've laid in every thing else.
    Lay in the whole form/figure, this way. Simplify:That's really the point of construction drawing.
    It can be used to draw everything else, as well...Not just the figure. Good work in those last posts!
    Hope that answers your questions. Keep practicing, you're off to a good start.
    ~Zombifried

    "Try not. Do or do not!! There is no try"
    -Yoda, The Empire Strikes Back

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    So, I take it I should force myself to block everything out in boxes first when drawing from life.

    In any case, I've done some more work on my anatomy guide. I think I'm ready to move on to the back muscles. I've also thrown in a self-portrait. I make no claims about its accuracy.

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    You seem to be drawing more from what you think you see than what you actually see - or at least, you're filling in gaps with what you think.

    Eyes are not that shape... And they aren't a single shape either, they're a group of contours around a sphere.

    Good work, though, keep it up!

    If at first you do not succeed, try, try again.

    My sketchbook:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=190559
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  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Fortune View Post
    You seem to be drawing more from what you think you see than what you actually see - or at least, you're filling in gaps with what you think.

    Eyes are not that shape... And they aren't a single shape either, they're a group of contours around a sphere.
    Is this in my portrait, reference diagram, or both?

    Anyway, I tried tweaking the eyes in my reference pic. Since it's a reference they're still a bit stylized, so I'll need to get my eye practise somewhere else. I also drew the eyeballs to get a sense of structure, though I'm not sure about their size and location.

    Any other places where I'm filling in the gaps too much?

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    Some sketches I did in a park and tonight's art class.

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    This picture is also from tonight. It gets its own post due to its backstory. The teacher made me draw this using a piece of charcoal taped to the end of a roughly metre-long stick. Yes, I had to hold the far end.

    Apparently our teacher doesn't care much for constructionist approaches to drawing, preferring a "drawing from the outside in" approach. He thought my drawings where I just did the outlines looked better than the ones where I tried construction (which, so far for me, consisted of framing the body on a stick figure). I'm not quite sure what to think of this.

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  12. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by VideroBoy View Post
    This picture is also from tonight. It gets its own post due to its backstory. The teacher made me draw this using a piece of charcoal taped to the end of a roughly metre-long stick. Yes, I had to hold the far end.

    Apparently our teacher doesn't care much for constructionist approaches to drawing, preferring a "drawing from the outside in" approach. He thought my drawings where I just did the outlines looked better than the ones where I tried construction (which, so far for me, consisted of framing the body on a stick figure). I'm not quite sure what to think of this.
    I would learn and use as many methods as you can. That's how you find out what works best for you. Different approaches, are like different tools to fill your toolbox with: That way, the more tools, the better equipped you are to handle different tasks. One approach might work well for one drawing, while another better for a different drawing. Sometimes a combination of techniques works best.
    Try them all, then decide what is working best for you. Use what your more comfortable with, that will probably give you the best results.
    ~Zombifried

    "Try not. Do or do not!! There is no try"
    -Yoda, The Empire Strikes Back

    zombifried's sketchbook
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    In any case, here's a figure I did from my imagination, mostly to see where I'm at.

    He seems a bit stiff, and I'm having trouble getting a handle on the perspective. I also need to do more feet studies.

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  14. #12
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    Trying out some stick figures from Loomis.

    How long do things like these figures take you guys? I'm asking because they seem to take a while for me.

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    I agree with zombifried - try everything, every approach has something to offer. Like when you mentioned that :
    The instruction has been more about using lines, tone, cross-contour, and a little bit of composition.
    You seemed disappointed that they weren't teaching you how to construct the figure outright; but it sounds like they were teaching you the very basics of mark-making and drawing anything, and training your eyes to see rather than to draw what you think you see. You need to know this before you draw anything, especially something as complex as the figure. But you're definately showing the right approach, teaching yourself the things you want to know in your own time rather than relying on the class to teach you - just remember to put in the effort and try and understand what they're trying to teach you too - you can always disregard it later when you have the hang of it, and are completely sure it doesn't help you with your goals at all.
    But you're doing great so far - keep going and don't lose the enthusiasm, it'll carry you there.

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    A critique for your red anatomy guy; His lats/rest of his deltoids seem to look like they're missing. It should look like there is a muscle at his back going up to his deltoids that kind of looks like a thick web. The size of this may vary with said person's weight training, but you'll see it on skinny persons as well.

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  17. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by VideroBoy View Post
    Trying out some stick figures from Loomis.

    How long do things like these figures take you guys? I'm asking because they seem to take a while for me.
    There isn't any set time limit, or really any standard time that it should take someone in the beginning. The key is to understand what you're drawing, not just to copy lines. The more time you spend, the more information you'll learn about what you're doing. Take your time, don't blindly rush through these exercises. You get more out of spending some time with your subject, rather than trying to finish the work as quickly as you can, at this stage.
    Timed studies will come when you're more familiar with drawing.
    ~Zombifried

    "Try not. Do or do not!! There is no try"
    -Yoda, The Empire Strikes Back

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    Quote Originally Posted by Enydimon View Post
    A critique for your red anatomy guy; His lats/rest of his deltoids seem to look like they're missing. It should look like there is a muscle at his back going up to his deltoids that kind of looks like a thick web. The size of this may vary with said person's weight training, but you'll see it on skinny persons as well.
    Thank you, though I'm having trouble visualizing this.

    In any case, here are some more Loomis mannequins. I'm not entirely satisfied with the pelvis and rib cage. I think starting with a box for the rib cage and then filling it in helped a little.

    This sort of brings me to another point: how do people handle figures in perspective? I've read up on point perspective and so on, but given the number of forms in the figure wouldn't you soon get lost in a sea of perspective guide lines? Does positioning, foreshortening, etc. have to be done mainly by eye?

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    More sketches.

    First is another page of Loomis studies. The mannequin in 3/4 view is hard.

    Second is boxes from imagination. I'm still unsure how I'd approach accurate perspective without the sea-of-guide-lines issue.

    Third is figures from imagination. I'm not sure how accurate the posing of the cross-legged figure is.

    Fourth is a bobcat from photo reference. I assume photos are my best bet for animals if I can't have pets (allergies) and there aren't any zoos around. I also put this picture in the first post to give this thread a better preview image.

    More about the bobcat. The body was out of focus in the photo so I only drew the outline. Also, I'm unsure about the eyes. In the photo the cat was looking down and to the right. In my drawing the cat seems to be just looking to the right.

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  20. #18
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    Haven't updated in a while.

    First pic from photo reference. Middle pics from life at my local art gallery. Last from imagination. Is it possible to give each attachment its own caption?

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