Enlarging a drawing for watercolour paper
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    Enlarging a drawing for watercolour paper

    I do a lot of my preliminary on A4 paper. I'm wanting to get it onto A3 for painting, but I've found it's very easy to ruin the surface of watercolour paper when drawing onto it and having to erase. What are my safest options for enlarging the drawing onto watercolour paper without trashing it?

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    Asatira is offline an amateur trying to figure things out Level 9 Gladiator: Hoplomachi
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    Haven't done it too often, but I've picked up a few suggestions here and there. One way to would be to make enlarged copies of sections to the scale you want, either going to a copy place and have them enlarge the images or scan the image and print it yourself, and tape together on the front if needed. Then either use carbon paper or charcoal/graphite rubbed on the back of the drawings, and incise/go over the lines and that will transfer the lines to the watercolor paper. Be careful with your pressure, you don't want to press too hard and dent your watercolor paper.

    Another way is to still enlarge through copies or printouts, and use a light table. The degree of success will vary based on the thickness of the paper and how much light will get through, but it's an alternative.

    Edit: Don't use carbon paper. Admittedly, I don't, but it was an option. However, Elwell pointed out good reasons not to below.

    Last edited by Asatira; June 10th, 2010 at 11:28 PM.
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    You could try and scan it then print it out on an A3 paper if you have the resources for that. Or you could just draw it on a normal A3 first and then trace it onto watercolor paper.

    I guess the best way would be to draw on an A3-paper from the start

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    I tried what mister Whitaker said in his sketchbook a while ago for one of my oils. And it works like a charm. You could do something like this:

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...&postcount=381

    Good luck

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    Method 1. Lightbox. (Or a window in daytime, but expect your arms to get tired!)

    Method 2. Projector.

    Can't recommend carbon paper or any other method of pressure transfer. You're going to damage the watercolor paper.

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    Or you could photocopy/scan and enlarge.

    Then lightbox. (Just depends on the thickness of the paper you are drawing onto)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asatira View Post
    ...Then either use carbon paper...
    Do not, under any circumstances, use carbon paper for transferring artistic work!!!! Old fashioned carbon paper (used for making duplicates of typed work in the pre-PC days, for the youngin's) uses dyes that aren't erasable, and will bleed though pretty much anything put on top of them. These days it's pretty hard to find, but I wouldn't want anybody to stumble over some in a drawer somewhere and use it.


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    I usually do it with the grid mehtod but I don't draw the full grid lines, only dots at the grid intersections with a soft pencil. As a reference for copying they work as well as a full grid, but if you keep them light they are easy to erase with an art gum eraser applying little to no pressure on the paper, and they leave no trace.

    Last edited by Scale; June 10th, 2010 at 05:30 AM.
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