Art: Direct Projection in Perspective?

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    duluth, mn
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Direct Projection in Perspective?

    After reading some information on the Cone of Vision in perspective, the author mentioned that a way of establishing that cone of vision is through a different kind of perspective called Direct-Projection.

    Though I already know how to establish the cone of vision using conventional perspective methods, can anyone elaborate on what Direct Projection is?

    - loken
    jtriska @ mcleodusa.net
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Ian Jones Guest
    I'm geussing that author was me...? You read it over at Sijun?

    Well 'Direct Projection' is a fancy word... it is the traditional method like arcitects use. With a top view ("directly projected") down to a station point (the eye position) and where this line of sight meets the picture plane you draw a vertical line downward to where it meets a line receding to a vanishing point. You also have side views to establish heights... using a height line, a set line of 'true length' that is touching the picture plane...

    This is probably the same as conventional perspective methods. How do you establish your cone of vision? Just curious...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    duluth, mn
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hah, glad your here. It was you.

    I just set my cone of vision using the same method you described above. I'd just never heard of it referred to as direct-projection.

    Thanks a lot though. Your post on sijun helped me with my struggles at the time on understanding the cone of vision. The book I was reading, Perspective for Comic Book Artists, explained it quite poorly.

    - loken
    jtriska @ mcleodusa.net
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Ian Jones Guest
    Cool, I thought it was just a case of two names for the same thing.

    I had a look at that 'perspective for comic book artists' once, and was surprised how much it covered, yet it also is very strange and misses a few vital things.

    This is the probelm with most perspective books, they cover almost everything... yet its the little bits they don't that are the most important! I bet you know what I mean... everyone has been in that boat.

    I still don't know if I totally understand it, I have read a lot and the collective knowledge helps to iron out a few issues that you wouldn't be able to figure out from just one book. Yet I still feel a bit daunted by perspective, I certainly don't pratice it enough so maybe thats the problem...

    I'll defintely write a mini-online book once I totally understand it and have tested it in every concievable situtation...(many years down the track) I have been frustrated by too many books that alost get there, then the methods fail you once you try something a little out of the normal, or a different camera angle or something that the book didn't give you a solution for.

    Keep posting questions and the more we discuss it maybe the better we'll understand it.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    chicago
    Posts
    862
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    i also have "perspective for comic book artists". Sorry to ask this but can you elaborate on this cone stuff? I'm trying to absorb all the info i can at this point. and from the description above...i'm still not really sure what you guys are talking about.
    pictures are worth a thousand words. got any example pics?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This sounds interesting, would you mind posting the link to your origional thread on sijun?

    Thanks.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Ian Jones Guest
    'Cone of Vision' is a system used while drawing in perspective.

    The cone of vision is a method of establishing a correct viewing area, so that a perspective drawing doesn't stretch to the edges of distortion (I'm sure you have seen many drawings that look somehow 'forced' in perspective, this is called 'perspective distortion').

    The cone of vision helps to represent normal human vision, so that perspective distortion does not occur. It is an imaginary picture area that is based on where the viewer is looking. Apart from limiting any distortion it simulates a humans normal viewing area and peripheral limits, so that a picture looks normal.

    The direction a viewer is looking is called the 'central axis of vision' it is an imaginary axis that travels in the same direction as the eye looks, it is static, you draw a perspective drawing under the assumption that the viewer looks in one direction and one direction only.

    Once you know where the viewer is looking, ie: the 'central axis of vision' you use an angle of 60 degrees from it in any direction. Hence the Cone of vision, because if you imagine the viewers eye, the central axis of vision heading directly away from it, and the 60 degrees in any direction from that central axis of vision makes a Cone shape. Much the same as a camera in a 3d program, they usually look like a cone and you use that to help you point it in the right direction. I don't know much about 3d but I bet you can alter that camera cone to a different angle to achieve different effects.

    Once you have your normal, undistorted viewing area... established by the cone of vision, you can safely draw inside it and you will have no distortion.

    Hope that all made sense. Do a search at Google or whatever.. I'm sure you'll find some pictures that will help explain it.

    Hope that helps. :eat:

    oh, btw the original thread is: http://www.sijun.com/cgi-bin/ultimat...c&f=3&t=003460

    It seems however that the images I was linking to have been deleted or moved. I'm sure the webmaster didn't appreciate my hotlinking..

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    duluth, mn
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I know exactly what your saying.. it is frustrating.

    My general rule of thumb is, You Can Never Have To Many Perspective Books!

    I've been studying Loomis's Succesful Drawing book and that has a lot to say about some very important issues about scaling in perspective. Worth a look if you havent checked it already.

    I cannot remember the name of the book for the life of me, but its about 6 inches tall and 4 inches wide, and blue, written in the early 20th century, and it has a lot of really great tips on perspective too. It explains things very clearly with some great illustrations. I'll try to find it again.

    - loken
    jtriska @ mcleodusa.net
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    chicago
    Posts
    862
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    thanks IAN!!!!!!!!!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Mooresville, NC, USA
    Posts
    477
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 13 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Has anyone read this particular book on perspective? I'm working my way through it now. So far, I like it, but it's the first book I've read on the subject, so I have nothing to compare it to.

    Direct Projection in Perspective?

    - blind
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    990
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 19 Times in 17 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    haha shit that reminds me of a technical drawing class i had once we had to construct shit like elipses in the isometric perspective and stuff

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    duluth, mn
    Posts
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Heya Blind,

    I do recall getting that book from the library once. I dont recall much, but I think it was decent.

    Dont rely on just one book though. As Ian said no one Perspective book seems to have everything. They always seem to miss at least one important aspect of it. So study this one until your done with it or until you get stuck, and then get another one and another, and so on until you cant possibly think theres much more to learn.

    - loken
    jtriska @ mcleodusa.net
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Mooresville, NC, USA
    Posts
    477
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 13 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'll do that, Loken. I'm trying to keep my eyes peeled for a Loomis book. Hopefully in a library sale or something. There's always the online versions, but I like having the real thing in front of me :cool:

    - blind
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook