Professional Studios sharing techniques and processes? (Harmful to artistic growth)?
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Thread: Professional Studios sharing techniques and processes? (Harmful to artistic growth)?

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    Professional Studios sharing techniques and processes? (Harmful to artistic growth)?

    Hello recently I have been trying to decide whether or not to go it alone in terms of becoming a concept artist. Primarily doing my own studies, creating my own techniques and such or the other option that is in my mind is to use visual arts tutorials online.

    The online tuts route seems the most beneficial in these modern times but I want to become the best artist "I" can be. Not trying to emulate someone else. I just see the current standardisation of techniques within the visual arts sector as a dangerous movement to its potential continuing growth. In my view it kind of delivers a tunnel vision state of mind to new upcoming artists who have not developed their own ways of thinking like the great masters once did. Obviously some have but the majority in my opinion have not. They all seem to carry this generic visual trend nowadays.

    I actually have this tremendous fear that I will become this production monkey delivering the same trend of work during my future career; so much so that this prospect has turned me off even trying (the problem with caring about it so much hahaha.....).

    Does anyone else see this or even relate to this? Maybe I am just being an idiot.

    Thank you for your time.

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    Well, I've known people who considered a concept artist position a treadmill, and eventually stepped off in order to pursue teaching and fine arts.

    About charting your own course, Machiavelli saw hundreds of years ago that innovators had a very tough row to hoe, and that he who wants it easy should deliver a product that is the safe expected thing rather than something new.

    I think the official line in here is "Join The Art Department" (taught by people who have made it and therefore apparently know what is expected).

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    Quote Originally Posted by virtualpsycho View Post
    upcoming artists who have not developed their own ways of thinking like the great masters once did..

    I'm not sure where people get this idea that "the old masters" sprung from the ground as painting superstars in isolation.
    They all worked as and trained with senior artists for years before they became a big name.

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    @ arttorney

    "Concept art position a Treadmill" ? - That is the exact type of work culture I am trying to avoid. I dont know I may have to refine my thinking further to eventually come up with an end employment goal in the visual arts field. Thanks for inside info.

    Regarding the Makaveli reference, I myself enjoy the challenge and pressure of tackling something completely new. I suppose though I must understand the current level expected to move forward. I hate playing it safe, thank you once again.

    @ Craig D

    That was not what I meant. I realise that the majority of artists have worked with great master artists and developed from that. I never said anything to the contrary. I meant that through the various educational programs out there nowadays, the techniques, processes and ways of understanding are becoming more standardised rather than more specific individual artists.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig D View Post
    I'm not sure where people get this idea that "the old masters" sprung from the ground as painting superstars in isolation.
    They all worked as and trained with senior artists for years before they became a big name.
    @virtualpsycho: I second this opinion. The first thing I check when I see questions like this are the OP's personal sketchbook thread. Anyone can see when a person's mastered the fundamentals and when they have not. It does not seem you've built up your fundamental knowledge of drawing yet based on the one sketch in your sketchpad.

    The fundamentals that you are calling "standardized and emulated" are exactly what the masters had to learn before branching out to their own stylisation. They are fundamentals because they are just that, essential. They've been broken down to the most simple steps, that they cannot be broken down any further. For example when you draw with macro angles, you cannot possibly break it down any further than that without distorting the entire form.

    Try to pickup the fundamentals before venturing off on your own. I would advise against secluding yourself to your own world when there is a wealth of knowledge out there to help you suceed.

    In car terms, Ferrari carries unique car designs that sets itself apart from other car makers. But essentially, its still a car and it had to built from the ground up using the same fundamental knowledge of engineering.

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    Quote Originally Posted by virtualpsycho View Post
    @ arttorney

    "Concept art position a Treadmill" ? - That is the exact type of work culture I am trying to avoid. I dont know I may have to refine my thinking further to eventually come up with an end employment goal in the visual arts field. Thanks for inside info.
    If you get hung up over that, then you'd best not go into any business at all. Every occupation can seem like a treadmill to some, from working construction to doing physics for NASA. Art is hardly an exception. The question isn't whether it's possible for someone to have that attitude, it's whether you love doing it enough to do it for a living, and dedicated enough to get through what, frankly, can be tedious exercises along the way.

    Heck, I'm going into animation, and imagine how many near-identical drawings <i>that</i> takes. Yeah, it can be a treadmill, but it's a magic treadmill.

    The Nezumi Works Sketchbook - Now in progress

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    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nezumi Works View Post
    If you get hung up over that, then you'd best not go into any business at all. Every occupation can seem like a treadmill to some, from working construction to doing physics for NASA. Art is hardly an exception. The question isn't whether it's possible for someone to have that attitude, it's whether you love doing it enough to do it for a living, and dedicated enough to get through what, frankly, can be tedious exercises along the way.

    Heck, I'm going into animation, and imagine how many near-identical drawings <i>that</i> takes. Yeah, it can be a treadmill, but it's a magic treadmill.
    haha
    love that one
    magic treadmill

    well said!
    still i think it should be possible to avoid treadmill work as much as possible in art business. i still believe in it at least!

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    @ redpandafire, yeah I know my skills are horrendous at present. I haven't done any drawing for the past six years, I never said I had mastered the skills required just that I was afraid of becoming safe and boring once I had done.

    @ Everyone who contributed so far....

    Thank you for reality check, i needed to be told straight.

    I had previously done computer based game art for the past five years but I eventually got so sick of it that I went back to 2d with miserable results as you can see.

    Last edited by virtualpsycho; June 7th, 2010 at 04:00 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajvenema View Post
    still i think it should be possible to avoid treadmill work as much as possible in art business. i still believe in it at least!
    Had an instructor last year, an old, jaded industry type. He'd been animating for something like 30 years, maybe more, and he had one phrase for when it seemed hard to take.

    "Could be diggin' ditches."

    He also had the inspirational story that he's never had to wear a tie since he was 20. That's always a plus.

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    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
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    Developing your own style and technique is something that you do by mastering and creatively tweaking and further developing a lot of knowledge that you learn from the masters, and putting your own spin into things, not by isolating yourself from what was already discovered by other people, it's like reinventng the wheel, a complete waste of time.
    The techniques and tutorials from professional studios are one of the most valuable things you can find to develop yourself as an artist, they don't harm you, on the contrary, and it's not about "emulating someone else", the technique is a TOOL that you use to create what you want to create.

    The Light and Dark Arts of Cristian Saksida
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    @ Nezumi Works

    I heard this from several people throughout my time involved in art and games development. It seems to be something that I keep forgetting to use to give some perspective. I like wearin' ties myself hahaha..... Cheers for post.

    @ Chris Saksida

    Thank you for post and straight forward advice. Much appreciated.

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