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Thread: killing.lesson (photoshop)

  1. #27
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    i'm around .. :p (this internet is soo huge!)
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  3. #28
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    I just wanted to say thanks for putting your demo online. I spent today sitting around with my new wacom and trying out all your tips. Here's what i ended up with. killing.lesson (photoshop)


    Quote Originally Posted by killing.people
    sorvan: that demo is rather unclear. i was attempting to bring something very simple into light that you could add to your belt of tools.

    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    i was trying to show the effects of a wash, making 4 values out of 2. when this is repeated, you get 6, and so on. i would [edit] NOT [/edit] use this tequique for an entire piece, though it would prove interesting. it is something you should be thinking of when you are making transparent strokes, i hope that helps!

    skatay: there are some great tutorials in this forum if you dig around. i remember raeding some very good ones that address edges as well. i used a hard brush against the edge of a soft, almost like erasing the fuzzy edge. it is rather simple, here is an image to hopefully better help you see what i did:

    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    hope that helps!

    peace!
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  4. #29
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    hardware

    The tips are great, but I'm currently working with just a mouse. What hardware do u use with photoshop? Do u know the preferred hardware by the majority of the artist. I'm curious because I am looking for one for myself.
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  5. #30
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    These are some great tuts thx lots
    My Sketchbook: http://conceptart.org/forums/showthr...57#post1396657
    Comments and feedback would be nice.
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  6. #31
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    I like the look of this style...very cool. You rock killing.people...thanks for the tut, had alot of fun trying this technique...alot harder to do than it looks, but thats how it always is ...this sketch took me about 30-45 mins. Well, back to work
    killing.lesson (photoshop)
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  7. #32
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    you're welcome everyone! i know it could be better but i am glad others are getting something from them - it makes me feel helpful and that feels great.

    i love seeing the studyings you've created after reading the different techniques, thanks for sharing them.

    Lats:
    very sorry for the late reply, maybe i can still help.

    here is a quote of something i typed to someone to explain the very very basics.

    Quote Originally Posted by killing.people on the igda boards
    this is a scanner:
    http://www.clicc.ucla.edu/images/scanner.jpg

    'kleenex' is to facial tissue, as 'wacom' is to digital tablet.
    this is a digital tablet:
    http://chip.ua/articles/vvod_032002/wacom_1.jpg

    this is a styllus:
    http://www.minitel.pt/novidades/Imag...0by%20step.jpg

    this is photoshop:
    http://www.uvmapper.com/photoshop.jpg

    this is painter:
    http://jimmac.musichall.cz/screenshots/wine-painter.png

    while there are also others that have the audacity to paint over digital or scanned photos or plagiarize another's artwork for their benefit - it's always a bummer learning some impressive artwork was faked. with the tools out today it would be fairly easy for someone to manipulate a photo and paint over it, and would be even that much more convincing if they had artistic talent aswell.

    i would imagine, if you were really infatuated with art, to a gross degree, it would be like discovering that, that girl was infact a guy. (also assuming you would be horrified by this)

    -killing
    hehe, it's always kinda humbling going back and reading your old posts ... you always think you sound so dumb in some shape or form .. right?
    note to self in the future: "yyyou're dumb! .."

    i use a Wacom series tablet. it is an Intuios2 platinum 9x12. i don't need such a big tablet, it sometimes gets rather cumbersome on a messy desk. download the current drivers off their site and read a bit about the different settings and configurations you can use.
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  8. #33
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    by the way I worship you
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  9. #34
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    i felt this image was very insightful; it displayed a progess of how to approach painting as a beginer. with this process you seperate values and color so you can tackle them one at a time. this is good to do for a complex painting or just to learn how to paint in general.

    this image is a paintover of someone elses work:

    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    1. i desaturate everything
    2. designate my key light source, render in my values and shadows.
    3. drop in a color layer and splash colors in
    4. add a normal layer on top of everything and clean up, introduce new colors, slightly alter colors, clean up color and value blends, edges, and highlights, and drop in a texture layer to dirty it up.

    just some more stuff in your belt

    -killing
    Last edited by killing.people; October 15th, 2004 at 04:34 AM.
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  11. #35
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    soft brushes are just evil
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  12. #36
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    Thanks man, I've been looking around for something like this. Great tips here.
    Don't hate me because I'm colorblind.
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  13. #37
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    awesome killing...I love your tips they are always good that's for sure!
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  14. #38
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    Great Stuff

    Thanks Killing
    I have a couple of questions geared towards a different part:
    What size file do you use? As far resolution is concerned and the overall size? What works well? Is 72dpi a good file size for say, posting on this site or should I be using a little larger? As far as the overall size is say a 8x5 in
    good? Im a little unclear on the final sizes...I know all about resolution, scanning and all the good stuff just really a little confused about what I should use to work on as far as drawing is concerned.
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  15. #39
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    What size file do you use?
    i usually open a 5"x5" 300dpi to doodle on just as habbit. but, my file size all depends on its purpose.

    FILE SIZE:

    this all depends on what our image is for - web? game model texture? print?

    know this:
    "Pixel dimension: The display size of an image on-screen is determined by the pixel dimensions of the image plus the size and setting of the monitor."

    dpi: this is used in photoshop. dpi means dots per inch (this is printer lingo)


    web - to clear up the matter, the only thing that matters for screen display is the pixel dimensions; the number of pixels that make up the width and height of the image. don't worry about how many inches or at what dpi your images is. your monitor screen is technically 72dpi, but actual dpi depends on what resolution/size someone's monitor is.

    if your monitor resolution is set to something high like 1600 by 1200 pixels, an 800x600 pixel image will take up 50% of the screen. if your monitor resolution was set to something lower, like 800 by 600 pixels, the 800x600 image would fill 100% of your screen.

    if you view an image at "actual pixels" this is how big the image will be displayed on the web at your resolution.
    to view an image at actual pixels: view > actual pixels (alt+ctl+0) -- also, you can select it by right-clicking with the zoom tool or selecting it on the zoom tool's "option bar" that will appear when you select the tool. work at whatever you want really, just make sure you size it down when displaying it on the web. i save images in jpg or gif formats. i hear png will be the new "standard" file format for the web. there is tons of info on the web on the topic.

    game model texture - these will be in pixel dimensions that are "in powers of 2"; 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 ... 512, 1024, etc. i save in tga file format.

    print - there is quite a bit to know here, and this isn't my most knowlegable area.

    some basic stuff that i know is the type of printer and paper plays a large role in your final result. printers use four different ink colors to print out a picture: CMYK, or Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK. so be sure to set your image to use a CMYK color mode (Image > Mode > CMYK color) i know that some types of printers can't print on the edges of paper so you may have to shrink an image by 90% to get it on a specific size of paper. and the dpi i print out also depends on what your printer can do. but aside from all that, i would recommend printing at 300dpi.

    for more info on this crud: in photoshop hit F1 and in the search type "dpi" and hit enter. if you are hungry for more, search for specific file types. for even more, search google - it is a great resource on the net.

    hope that helps.
    Last edited by killing.people; October 10th, 2004 at 06:03 PM.
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