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  1. #31
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    I like the look of this style...very cool. You rock killing.people...thanks for the tut, had alot of fun trying this technique...alot harder to do than it looks, but thats how it always is ...this sketch took me about 30-45 mins. Well, back to work
    killing.lesson (photoshop)

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  3. #32
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    you're welcome everyone! i know it could be better but i am glad others are getting something from them - it makes me feel helpful and that feels great.

    i love seeing the studyings you've created after reading the different techniques, thanks for sharing them.

    Lats:
    very sorry for the late reply, maybe i can still help.

    here is a quote of something i typed to someone to explain the very very basics.

    Quote Originally Posted by killing.people on the igda boards
    this is a scanner:
    http://www.clicc.ucla.edu/images/scanner.jpg

    'kleenex' is to facial tissue, as 'wacom' is to digital tablet.
    this is a digital tablet:
    http://chip.ua/articles/vvod_032002/wacom_1.jpg

    this is a styllus:
    http://www.minitel.pt/novidades/Imag...0by%20step.jpg

    this is photoshop:
    http://www.uvmapper.com/photoshop.jpg

    this is painter:
    http://jimmac.musichall.cz/screenshots/wine-painter.png

    while there are also others that have the audacity to paint over digital or scanned photos or plagiarize another's artwork for their benefit - it's always a bummer learning some impressive artwork was faked. with the tools out today it would be fairly easy for someone to manipulate a photo and paint over it, and would be even that much more convincing if they had artistic talent aswell.

    i would imagine, if you were really infatuated with art, to a gross degree, it would be like discovering that, that girl was infact a guy. (also assuming you would be horrified by this)

    -killing
    hehe, it's always kinda humbling going back and reading your old posts ... you always think you sound so dumb in some shape or form .. right?
    note to self in the future: "yyyou're dumb! .."

    i use a Wacom series tablet. it is an Intuios2 platinum 9x12. i don't need such a big tablet, it sometimes gets rather cumbersome on a messy desk. download the current drivers off their site and read a bit about the different settings and configurations you can use.

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  4. #33
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    by the way I worship you

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  5. #34
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    i felt this image was very insightful; it displayed a progess of how to approach painting as a beginer. with this process you seperate values and color so you can tackle them one at a time. this is good to do for a complex painting or just to learn how to paint in general.

    this image is a paintover of someone elses work:

    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    1. i desaturate everything
    2. designate my key light source, render in my values and shadows.
    3. drop in a color layer and splash colors in
    4. add a normal layer on top of everything and clean up, introduce new colors, slightly alter colors, clean up color and value blends, edges, and highlights, and drop in a texture layer to dirty it up.

    just some more stuff in your belt

    -killing

    Last edited by killing.people; October 15th, 2004 at 05:34 AM.
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  7. #35
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    soft brushes are just evil

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  8. #36
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    Thanks man, I've been looking around for something like this. Great tips here.

    Don't hate me because I'm colorblind.
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  9. #37
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    awesome killing...I love your tips they are always good that's for sure!

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  10. #38
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    Great Stuff

    Thanks Killing
    I have a couple of questions geared towards a different part:
    What size file do you use? As far resolution is concerned and the overall size? What works well? Is 72dpi a good file size for say, posting on this site or should I be using a little larger? As far as the overall size is say a 8x5 in
    good? Im a little unclear on the final sizes...I know all about resolution, scanning and all the good stuff just really a little confused about what I should use to work on as far as drawing is concerned.

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  11. #39
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    What size file do you use?
    i usually open a 5"x5" 300dpi to doodle on just as habbit. but, my file size all depends on its purpose.

    FILE SIZE:

    this all depends on what our image is for - web? game model texture? print?

    know this:
    "Pixel dimension: The display size of an image on-screen is determined by the pixel dimensions of the image plus the size and setting of the monitor."

    dpi: this is used in photoshop. dpi means dots per inch (this is printer lingo)


    web - to clear up the matter, the only thing that matters for screen display is the pixel dimensions; the number of pixels that make up the width and height of the image. don't worry about how many inches or at what dpi your images is. your monitor screen is technically 72dpi, but actual dpi depends on what resolution/size someone's monitor is.

    if your monitor resolution is set to something high like 1600 by 1200 pixels, an 800x600 pixel image will take up 50% of the screen. if your monitor resolution was set to something lower, like 800 by 600 pixels, the 800x600 image would fill 100% of your screen.

    if you view an image at "actual pixels" this is how big the image will be displayed on the web at your resolution.
    to view an image at actual pixels: view > actual pixels (alt+ctl+0) -- also, you can select it by right-clicking with the zoom tool or selecting it on the zoom tool's "option bar" that will appear when you select the tool. work at whatever you want really, just make sure you size it down when displaying it on the web. i save images in jpg or gif formats. i hear png will be the new "standard" file format for the web. there is tons of info on the web on the topic.

    game model texture - these will be in pixel dimensions that are "in powers of 2"; 4, 8, 16, 32, 64 ... 512, 1024, etc. i save in tga file format.

    print - there is quite a bit to know here, and this isn't my most knowlegable area.

    some basic stuff that i know is the type of printer and paper plays a large role in your final result. printers use four different ink colors to print out a picture: CMYK, or Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and blacK. so be sure to set your image to use a CMYK color mode (Image > Mode > CMYK color) i know that some types of printers can't print on the edges of paper so you may have to shrink an image by 90% to get it on a specific size of paper. and the dpi i print out also depends on what your printer can do. but aside from all that, i would recommend printing at 300dpi.

    for more info on this crud: in photoshop hit F1 and in the search type "dpi" and hit enter. if you are hungry for more, search for specific file types. for even more, search google - it is a great resource on the net.

    hope that helps.

    Last edited by killing.people; October 10th, 2004 at 07:03 PM.
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  12. #40
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    oh man, i cant believe i missed this thread, super duper helpful, really great points you make... im gunna go try this stuff out.

    Sketch Book
    rook-art.com
    Quote Originally Posted by dogfood
    Sarcasm sometimes grips me like an octopus helmet.
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  13. #41
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    Great tutorials, K.P!

    K.P:

    Wonderfully done tutorials. Thank you for all the good info, especially on the hw/sw (Hey! That was MY question!). The thing which impresses me about your technique are the parallels with classical oil painting technique using layers. For the past few years I have been experimenting with techniques used by Rubens (or at least what I think was going on, based on his paintings), and this tutorial is, with the exception of the clean-up, almost exactly what he was doing! One thing I don't htink you can do ditally is get the "turbid medium" effect, which states that when you paint a transparent layer lighter in value over one darker in value, the temperature becomes cooler NO MATTER WHAT COLORS WERE USED! And vice versa. Rubens, and others, used this technique extensively to get the cool transitions in interior forms which turned them.

    Again, thanks for the information, and remember, the really old guys did it first!

    Martín de Madrid
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  14. #42
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    Animation in tuitorials

    K.P:

    How do you make those cool animated illos in your tuitorials?

    Martín de Madrid
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  15. #43
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    Martin de Madrid:
    as I painted in photoshop, I created a new layer at different stages by hitting ctrl+j after I was done trying to express the different steps, i opened "ImageReady" which is intergrated into Photoshop and with all layers other than the first stage hidden, created the first frame, and revealed each layer with each new frame. Each frame you can set the cell length, so the last frame I made much longer.

    you can also use camtasia studio, which is an excellent software for visual communications. Like Image Ready, you can create animated gifs if you so desire.

    On that note, here are 3 screen capture videos that take you along with me when painting this piece here:
    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    i am not too pleased with this piece, but i feel it's purpose may be received valuable.

    i tried to make them as short as possible =\
    last ones kinda big =\ sorry 'bout that. this is my first go at recording myself. it was kinda hard because i kept rushing myself which made me messup and the recording software was stealing all my juice! it was kinda frusterating painting all jerky-like.

    they are avis, divx 5.1.1

    edit video links died /edit
    avi/KpDemo01.rar]Part 1, 5 minutes (15MB download)
    avi/KpDemo02.rar]Part 2, 4 minutes (11MB download)[/url]
    avi/KpDemo03.rar]Part 3, 17 minutes (46MB download)[/url]

    same vidoes uploaded by jt4470:
    http://rapidshare.com/files/16699224/KpDemo01.avi.html
    http://rapidshare.com/files/16700064/kpDemo02.avi.html
    http://rapidshare.com/files/16703130/kpDemo03.avi.html

    -killing

    Last edited by killing.people; March 1st, 2007 at 12:41 PM.
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  16. #44
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    K.P:

    Hey, no problem with the size of the files! Thank you for your usual generousity. I will play around with the ideas you have given me. One thing I am considering is to scan in examples of the colors on my palette and "try out" layering ideas on the computer. No mess, no expensive paints, and I can undo to my hearts content. Then, when I am ready to paint, I have a game plan which is pretty much proven, although some things you just cannot get on a machine. Still it might be a good way to go. I am also considering using Poser and Director for posing ideas. First I have to get the software and hardware! Kind of hard doing it without. . ..

    Again, thank you. I look forward to your new posts.

    Martín de Madrid
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  17. #45
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    holy crap

    if theres something i've learned from the sickeningly large percentage of my life ive spent in school thus far its that ten different people can explain the same thing to you ten different ways and its only the 11th person that will make it all click.

    thanks for being that 11th person on this occasion. ive been trying to learn how to color things in photoshop for the longest time and until i found this tread last week i was predominately clueless. of course there are different techniques for different people and your is more actually painting then applying colors to someone else's work (ala liquid!) but this makes the most sense to me and when i started fooling around with it on my own i came out with the best looking photoshop generated stuff i've ever done (crap compared to you work obviously but still).

    and now with those video's youve made me feel that really high quality professional looking imagery is within my atainable grasp. i haven't had an art erection (yes i said art erection) since i picked up "how to draw comics the marvel way!" a long time ago. thanks for all the help and insight! two quick things though.

    1.)the second video was very helpful but im still a little in the dark about overlaying colors on top of the b&w tones. it looks like you just put them on a different layer and adjust the blending options but for some reason i feel as though i'm missing something. would you mind shedding a bit more light on the subject.

    2.)why the hell dont you have your own website with all this stuff on it? as much as i love this site we all know this thred will eventually pushed to the back somewhere with time. you should have a site of your own. hell i could see a market for your own dvd's...ive seen ones with less information sold and do fairly well. im a desinger and filmmaker. drop me an email if this is at all even remotely interesting.

    thanks again.

    now i just have to hide this art erection

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  18. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Lynch
    the second video was very helpful but im still a little in the dark about overlaying colors on top of the b&w tones. it looks like you just put them on a different layer and adjust the blending options but for some reason i feel as though i'm missing something. would you mind shedding a bit more light on the subject.
    especially with a program like photoshop, there are many ways to approach creating a piece of art. i feel that the best approach will be the most comfortable and most natural for the artist.

    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    1. scanned pencil work

    2. background color

    3. flat color for character

    before this point should be playful and fearless. my patience willing, once i have something that i like, i create a new layer (4) and i begin to polish.

    4. "Normal" type layer. I like to pull colors from the painting at first.

    this thred will eventually pushed to the back somewhere with time.
    this thread is stickied, so as long as it is and the site stays stable, it will stay towards the top. hey thanks for your kind words, i am glad you got something from this thread. i don't have my own space just yet, hehe, i am a very very poor art student right now.

    dvds? hah, i don't know about that. that makes me nervous to think about. thanks for the offer. i don't think what i am saying is all that revolutionary. i like giving advice. it is worth what people pay for it now. i don't feel my advice should be paid for, i would want to be very confident that a product of mine was someone's time and money - i hate buying shit i thought was good. i am still a very young artist, i have much to learn. your offer does flatter me, thanks again.

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  19. #47
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    Think about it!

    K.P.:

    The ability to explain something as concept-dependent and skill-dependent as art, especially on a complex program such as PhotoShop is rare. There are many people out and about putting together really lousy instructional products for it, and making money too.

    Your explainations and demos are much, much better than most, and hence have value. Take the hint! I suggest you start your own newsletter on the subject. If you want information on how to do the newsletter, I have a little (successful) experience and would be happy to help you with that part of it.

    Not only would you be helping others, you might just end up making some passive income which could help support your own art. The key is PASSIVE income. Once you have put the thing together, it is mainly a matter of constantly getting out and about and promoting. With all the fans you currently have on this board, you could probably easily do a viral approach, which is much more effective and easier on you.

    The added bonus is that you end up spreading knowledge, and, like it or not achieve a bit of fame (in this case well-deserved). That is NOT a bad thing! It could well be the deciding factor in getting a sweet full-time position with a good company, or helping you get your own thing off the ground.

    The promotion part of it is especially interesting because one of the most effective means is exactly what I am doing here, and on other boards: posting messages which are, hopefully, useful and well-received. My "ad" is the link in my signature, and it WORKS like a charm. It sets up a win-win-win situation between myself, the boards and the people reading the posts. That is one of the nicest things about the Internet. It opens up win-win situations in the reciporical exchange of information. . . everyone wins.

    ------------------

    Off subject: by the way, the demo files were in a format for which I do not have a decompressing program. Where do I get the program, and how do I use it. I tried going to the website for this program, but the decompression did not work, so I have not been able to see your demos, and I am sure they are very good.

    Last edited by Martin de Madrid; November 14th, 2004 at 06:01 AM.
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  20. #48
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    i agree with martin- your instruction in this difficult area is very very good and its rare to find any instruction on this topic let alone good instruction.

    its nice to know that this thread is stickied but i cant help that feel having all of this stuff in one place in the form of either a website or a newsletter would be a lot more useful.

    dont worry about the dvd, i was pretty much thinking out loud and i know what you mean about not having money for a site of your own- im a poor art student as well. thanks again for the help.

    are there any tips you have for us on textures?

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  21. #49
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    thank you both for your enthusiasm about all of this!
    a character such as myself (an art student enjoying being an art student while he can) doesn't have much time for extra tasks. the conceptart boards work as a perfect utility for pitching in my cents for the community. take what you need and give what you can.

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin de Madrid
    the demo files were in a format for which I do not have a decompressing program. Where do I get the program, and how do I use it? I tried going to the website for this program, but the decompression did not work ...
    it should work by simply running the file downloaded from here:
    http://www.divx.com/divx/download

    quick tips on textures:

    1. FORM FIRST! =p
    2. use real/photographic reference if you are not pleased
    3. in your thoughts, try breaking a texture into different elements; think in layers.
    4. think about the surface and beyond it - opacity, specularity.

    i feel, most importantly:
    5. experiment. realise there will not always be a tutorial to hold your hand when you get to a material you don't have a process for.

    you are playing with the tooth that must be pulled if you are searching for a process. respectively, you should NOT search for a process, but for tools.

    creativity is a fire, do not smother it, let it breath, let it burn.

    Last edited by killing.people; November 15th, 2004 at 03:05 AM.
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  22. #50
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    I've been keeping tabs on this thread for awhile, love your tutorials, seems it helps alot of people and I can see why, thanks for killing people with your art skills.

    "If you only heard one side of the story, then you must be deaf in the other ear." - Sok N. Wett

    Sok's Sketchbook Thread Last Updated November 25
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    Red face

    your point is well taken about experimentation being more important in a lot of ways than how to's, tips, and even tutorials.

    though its impossible for you to tell otherwise, both because of the lack of my own work i have posted here or anywhere else at the moment and because of my near sycophantish praising of the helpf you given me and the others on this site, i believe whole heartedly in not be bound to another's approach for, as in many things, art is in the approach. so please dont mistake my eagerness for simple step by step insturuction as a desire for a clear recipe. if i approached such things in that manner i would not be where i am.

    i am simply enthusiastic about this thread and anything else like it because (and as an art student im sure you can relate) instruction on actual technique is quite rare.

    still though, thanks for all the help so far.

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    another run through

    meshead, a friend of mine, asked:
    How would you start this painting? How would you do this? Show me to teach me. PLEASE
    Perhaps if many of you work on this with me we will all learn something from it.
    and posted this image:
    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    so here is another runthrough in my response to him:

    first, three big slaps:
    get rid of your signature!! *SLAP
    draw the entire figure!! *SLAP
    ONE more, for good measure!! *SLAP


    design, anatomy and composition adjustments.
    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    light values to find light source. lines over background color.
    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    new layer for foreground flatcolor seperate layers for club and tatoos. i needed to get under the skin colors for the club and the tatoos to see what they might look like so i could editi them out if i needed (plan ahead).
    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    if you wanted the painting to be huge, this is the time to make it the size you want.

    on the left new layer over EVERYTHING - i call these TU (touch-up) layers. get in tighter and clean up everything, hide those black pencil lines, etc.
    on the right dodging are burning can push values. over use it and you destroy your painting.
    killing.lesson (photoshop)

    one bite at a time.

    now get to work.

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  25. #53
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    killing.people I just have to ask since I'm new and all. Do you remove the old sketch / scan layer after you paint over it on a different layer ?

    Last edited by your_all_small; December 30th, 2004 at 06:59 PM.
    You will never get another today tomorrow!
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  26. #54
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    your_all_small, hello

    nah man i don't remove them. you could. i keep them around and just paint over them if i want to get really detailed. yup. it's you're by the way, not your.

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    thx dude and I didnt have much chiece the other one was taken

    You will never get another today tomorrow!
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  28. #56
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    KP:

    Another killer tut!

    I still cannot get over the similarity between your technique with PS and the oil painting technique I learned under Stephen Douglas at the Laguna College of Art and Design! I really wish I had a Wacom talblet! Eventually I'll get one and go back to all your tuts and kind of go nuts!

    Many thanks, may all your threads remain sticky forever!

    Best in paint,

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    Ehm I have a query:

    I draw a line, and after a while I want to continue painting with that tone. When I try to do so, if I go over the old line, it gets darker (as you have explained), but... what if I dont want this to happen? I sometimes get some gaps which I want to fill, and cannot do this because I fear I can make the old paint darker How can avoid getting old lines darker?

    "For a man who doesn't know to which port we wants to sail to, all winds are unfavourable"
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  30. #58
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    post the resst ppleeassseeee killing.lesson (photoshop)

    ps: id put the opacity back up and just copy the color u took for the other stuff with the lower opacity... i dont know an "official" solution but thats how id do it

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  31. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by krakel
    post the resst ppleeassseeee killing.lesson (photoshop)

    ps: id put the opacity back up and just copy the color u took for the other stuff with the lower opacity... i dont know an "official" solution but thats how id do it
    Just realized it. Thx anyway Lovely tutorial. Just did the torso thing. Damm got to study some anathomy xD

    "For a man who doesn't know to which port we wants to sail to, all winds are unfavourable"
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  32. #60
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    we made it to page 2!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alberaan
    Damm got to study some anathomy xD
    i found this site VERY helpful for highlighting anatomy in your mind:
    http://www.reybustos.com/03ra/ra.html

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