Good Lighting for Photographing Paintings

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  1. #1
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    Good Lighting for Photographing Paintings

    I'd use the search feature, except I'm search feature retarded because every time I use it I get random results having nothing to do with what I'm looking for. So I apologize, I'm sure this has been asked before!

    Anyways! I've been trying to accurately photograph my paintings for years now. I've gone through four cameras in the process and I still can not accurately photograph a painting larger than 16 x 20. The colors come out wrong. My camera will fish eye. It's just a huge headache. I did find an older post on CA suggesting to use a gray scale card, and set the camera on a timer. Awesome advice! I'll be doing that for sure. PS I found that through google, not the search.

    Now I need some decent lighting. My largest sized canvas is 3ft by 5ft. I need a really awesome picture because - I want to make prints. So how do I go about lighting up this sucker, and other larger canvases?

    I know that I'm supposed to have two lights at an angle....but...I don't know where to get the lights. And I'm poor. I can't afford something that's going to cost hundreds. I'm trying to MAKE money. Is there an inexpensive way to get some good lighting for your canvases?

    BTW, I've tried the whole take your painting outside and set in the shade deal. But that means to place my camera on the ground and my tripod doesn't go low enough for some of my paintings :b

    Any help would be great! I just bought a 12.0 mp camera and I'm looking forward to finally making some 18x24 prints!

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  3. #2
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    Look at this tutorial by Dan Dos Santos, in the last part he explains how he photographs his paintings, he gives some good tips:

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=45901

    Hope it helps! (oh, and use a tripod!)

    The Light and Dark Arts of Cristian Saksida
    Portfolio:http://www.chrissaksida.com
    Blog:http://cristiansaksidaarts.blogspot.com
    Twitter:http://twitter.com/crissaksida
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  5. #3
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    Use sunlight. Problem solved in the best way possible.

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Saksida View Post
    Look at this tutorial by Dan Dos Santos, in the last part he explains how he photographs his paintings, he gives some good tips:

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=45901

    Hope it helps! (oh, and use a tripod!)
    Thanks! Thats a sweet tutorial, and I would have been one of those tards who would put the lights at the 'bad' angle . But wow, those are pretty expensive lights. Still gotta shop for a cheaper alternative.

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