Robot with no casing and robot on the moon - Critique wanted

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    Robot with no casing and robot on the moon - Critique wanted

    Hello, i'm a photographer who's recently discovered that i can draw as well.

    These two images are the first thing i've drawn for a long time that isn't a stickman. So please, have at these.

    Robot with no casing and robot on the moon - Critique wanted

    Robot with no casing and robot on the moon - Critique wanted

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    Well, it's a start. You've got a long road ahead of you, but don't we all? If nothing else, you've shown enthusiasm and interest, and that's the beginning of everything we do.

    First thing I'd recommend you doing is getting a copy of Drawing On the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards and go through the exercises she gives in there. As well, start drawing real things. Objects on your desk, insides of rooms, people, whatever you want. Doesn't matter what, just start drawing a lot of them. Learning a bit about perspective wouldn't hurt either, there's an excellent tutorial here.

    I'd also stop using ballpoint pen for a while and just use pencils. It takes a bit of experience to do ballpoint well, and at the beginning stages it's good to be able to erase things.

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    Smile I agree with Nezumi.

    I agree with Nezumi, you have a lot of learning to do, but as an already accomplished artist with photography, im sure you have the creativity part down, thats sometimes the hardest part for some people. Learn about some human anatomy for figure drawing, and some perspective for environment drawing. Im a beginning artist myself, so stick in there and you will be rewarded greatly. Good luck!

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    What Nez said. Having some motivation helps, too.

    Amateur Artist. Professional Asshole.

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    Having done a bit of amateur photography before I came to drawing (only about four years ago, in fact), one thing that you do likely bring to the table is a sense of composition. You'll already know about things like the rule of thirds, high vs. low horizon lines, balance, and that sort of thing, and that's all very applicable to what a graphic artist who deals with drawing or painting does. Remember to always apply those skills, you worked for them.

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    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
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    Thanks for the advice I was drawing with biro, as it felt more natural than using a pencil.

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    Well, you could either research, develop and execute a lot of drawing exercises to help you build on the basics, or you could enroll in some community college art classes.

    Either way the things you should focus on right now are things like form, perspective, anatomy, and maybe shading, depending on if your more interested in linear illustrations, or pieces filled out with values.

    It's a long road indeed, but if you stick with it you'll be very satisfied. Best wishes,

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    As it happens, i'm at college until the end of next month, i'm working through a photography degree.

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    The tank with a house looks very creative!

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    Recommended book: "Successful Drawing" by Loomis. Should save you from a lot of bumping in the dark.

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