Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    171
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 62 Times in 39 Posts

    Best anatomy book.

    This might go in references or whatever, but I feel like it's a pressing question for this forum as well.

    I'm not interested in Andrew Loomis, George Bridgeman, or any of that. I've already consulted those, and they serve a nice purpose, but they're not what I desire. I'm far more interested in legitimate anatomy. I've consulted Peck, have Goldfinger and Richer out on loan, et cetera...I feel as though I need a medical atlas of anatomy, or one more specialized than merely "here look at these idealized people."

    I've accumulated a huge list (having no money and having a ton of free time makes that quite easy) and have come up with the following:

    Netter's Atlas of Human Anatomy:
    http://www.amazon.com/Atlas-Human-An...e=UTF8&s=books or the "professional version" http://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-Profes...tt_at_ep_dpi_3
    Clinical Gross Anatomy: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/032...pf_rd_i=507846
    Rohan's:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/078...pf_rd_i=507846 (photographic...yeeesh!)
    Thieme's Atlas of Human Anatomy:
    http://www.amazon.com/Atlas-Anatomy-...ref=pd_sim_b_2
    The classic Gray's, in a trifecta of:
    http://www.amazon.com/Grays-Anatomy-.../ref=pd_cp_b_2 (seems to be mostly medical), http://www.amazon.com/Grays-Anatomy-...ref=pd_sim_b_2 (a nice student book), and http://www.amazon.com/Grays-Atlas-An...ref=pd_sim_b_1, which is the actual atlas of anatomy.

    Of course, I'd love to discover a Die Gestalt des Menschen, but that seems improbable.

    I'm still quite in the beginning stages of fine arts, though I have lots of in-class doodling under my belt, and am working through the Charles Bargue drawing course at a slow pace amidst school, work, eating, sleeping, and living, but I figure you get what you pay for in this industry and I'd like to escape the awkward phase of not quite knowing what I'm actually portraying (though in reality, I don't think we could ever KNOW what we portray). I still want to idealize as much as the next person, but I might as well figure out what I'm working with.

    This looks nice as well.
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...24156/bpo01-20

    Has anybody taken this route? Any advice? Yours would be much appreciated.

    Thanks and goodnight.


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    81
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    true most anatomy books for artists or otherwise depict subjects with idealized proportions.

    however I think it serves it's purpose ; by showing how the muscles act and what their form is. Once that is understood; there shouldn't be a problem drawing a subject no matter what their form is. They have a structure and muscles that are all developed in different ways.


    Knowing anatomy helps and drawing ability helps. But the ability to see will carry you the most.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    81
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    oops it double posted..

    sounds like you already have many informative books. my advice is to simply drawing a lot

    I am also interested in anatomy and have bought several books on the subject.

    It is important but there are so many things to study.
    Last edited by Msegal; May 2nd, 2010 at 12:28 PM.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    SF, CA, USA
    Posts
    478
    Thanks
    72
    Thanked 329 Times in 180 Posts

    Anatomy knowledge vs "seeing" knowledge ..

    I think building a clear knowledge of surface anatomy is necessary for a figure artist. I have come to think, however, that learning to draw and paint what you are seeing and building a strong foundation in that discipline first, will ultimately serve you better over time.

    I can agree that idealizations can potentially be of limited use ( eg. Loomis, Bridgman) but I think their work can also lead students of it to a clearer understanding of how forms turn, how they intersect ( roundings and endings), what shapes do in what perspective, how attitude flows through a form etc.,

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    171
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 62 Times in 39 Posts
    I don't disagree with either point. The best way to get better is indeed to practice.

    One of my primary reasons for asking is I'm taking a Baroque Art and Architecture class. Despite the incredibly limited amount of anatomical knowledge (the breasts painted by Rubens or Orazio Gentileschi are laughable in comparison to, you know, actual breasts), these guys had the opportunity to look at cadavers and REALLY study anatomy. I don't quite have the stomach to actually do so quite yet, but the topic does interest me...I just don't want a copy of a copy of a copy of a copy, you know? (Which is rather ironic, considering I am studying Bargue)

    Is studying in the manner of the old masters still relevant?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    81
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 20 Times in 18 Posts
    if you find an old master you really like; you imitate them and in the process that style becomes your own.

    whatever works for you; there are an unlimited amount of approaches; experiment

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Brazil / Berkeley, CA
    Posts
    140
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 36 Times in 24 Posts
    HI Anniebelle,

    In a sense, I don't feel qualified to give advice on this topic, since I am struggling to learn the craft myself. In another sense, however, I have great interest in *knowing* the body (rather than simply learning to copy what is out there), and I believe understanding anatomy plays a very important role in that.

    You are right that many of the old masters, starting in the renaissance, had the chance of working directly from cadavers -- from the real stuff, so to speak. However, let's not forget that great part of the appeal that their works might have to us has as much to do with what they left out as with what they've put in there. Their work is, in a very important sense, idealized; the forms they work with, however complex they might seem, are still simplifications. And simplification, in drawing, serves a very important purpose: clarity. You will see, for instance, how someone like Rubens (despite all the complexity of the muscular "bumps" that one first notices) is interested above all in showing how one form overlaps with and wedges in the other. The idealizations (the ideas) these artists have come up, to be sure, with were based on a deep knowledge of non-idealized reality (supposing we have access to such a thing). However, I believe this is a two-way movement: if it is true that a deep knowledge of the underlying reality will help you come with the idealization that best suits you, the idealization reflect back on reality, and by mean of its (artificial) order casts light on what would otherwise be a chaotic manifold of data. When *everything* is relevant, as in non-edited reality, nothing is really relevant, nothing stands out. The idealizations (and the ideas, if we want to get more philosophical), which are originally extracted from reality, reflect back upon it and help us make sense of it.


    All this lengthy post can be summed up thus: I think it is a worthy endeavor to try to go beyond idealizations and see things in all their complexity. But be aware of the risks: drawing (a harmonious drawing, that is) is mostly about leading to what is important; it is a delicate balance between placing the right emphasis and knowing when to leave things out. Medical anatomy books have a different purpose, and that's part of the reason why an accomplished anatomist (or a doctor) does not necessarily know how to draw.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to bkkm For This Useful Post:


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 22
    Last Post: June 9th, 2010, 05:06 AM
  2. My Anatomy book?
    By CarlSpringer in forum Art Discussions
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: December 29th, 2009, 09:40 AM
  3. Anatomy Book
    By Tiko in forum Art Discussions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: June 20th, 2009, 02:11 PM
  4. Art: how to use an anatomy book?
    By max xiantu in forum Fine Art
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: September 5th, 2006, 06:26 AM
  5. Bought an Anatomy Book
    By thomasaurus in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: August 2nd, 2003, 10:09 PM

Members who have read this thread: 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.