MyPaint Sketching Program

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  1. #1
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    MyPaint Sketching Program

    Hello everyone
    I saw this little app being mentioned in the photoshop section and figured I'd spread some info about here too since I know a lot of folks here use Sketchbook pro as well.

    This FREE sketching program is the bomb. The interface isn't as slick as SP Pro, but it is about the same as Corel sketchpad - only this program makes Corel sketchpad and in some aspects SB pro look like a charity case. I'm still playing with it, but my initial reaction is that I'll be using this a lot more in the future. It even has texture (Ala painter) blends, a very cool sketching program.

    Check out here: http://mypaint.intilinux.com/?page_id=9

    And sarcastically flog me if everyone knew about this one except me LOL!


    Edit: I take back some of my glowing endorsement - just found out you can't adjust image/canvas size and no psd support - meh! It's free tho so I guess you can't beat that. It's still an awesome deal tho.

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    Last edited by artmessiah; April 21st, 2010 at 11:21 PM.
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  3. #2
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    I downloaded this program, its definitely slick, really nice. I like it more then artrage. Its great because you can throw ideas down fast with great range. And the ever expanding size is also a really nice feature. I doubt it would replace photoshop or gimp, but as a quick sketchbook and doodle program I would totally recommend trying it.

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  4. #3
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    I'm using MyPaint on my Nokia N900 mobile phone, running linux-based Maemo operating system, which has a 3.5" resistive touch screen, and you can use a stylus with it. I'm using my old Intuos pen which is of course better for drawing than the stylus that came with the phone. I've only painted a little while in the phone but MyPaint really rocks in it. I never thought when buying the phone that I would practically have a small sketchbook with me all the time.

    MyPaint is of course not as feature rich as Painter or Photoshop, which both I use painting on the computer. But it has layers and the brushes are quite nice, and you can modify them quite a lot. To my knowledge the canvas size is as big as you want, and you can change the size and crop it later e.g. in Gimp which has an import/export plug-in for the Open Raster (.ora) file format MyPaint uses. I guess if you want to start with an exact canvas size you could draw some marking lines in a document sized they way you want in Gimp/PS/Painter and then save it as .png and open it then in the MyPaint. That way you'd know from the beginning the dimensions right.

    So, I painted this with MyPaint in Nokia N900, and it's sort of unfinished, but I guess I see it more of a sketch than a final work. When I saw it the first time on a computer screen after I'd already finished painting it on the phone I was a bit disappointed because I saw all the flaws it has, I mean 3,5" screen is pretty small, even if I painted it zoomed in. But I just gotta keep painting and hopefully I get better



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  5. #4
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    That timelapse video looks wicked You can really have world class tools with free / open source software.

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  6. #5
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    If you want the brushes to be more responsive "Disable GTK Double Buffering" and they will much less mechanical, this made all the difference for me.

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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Portus View Post
    If you want the brushes to be more responsive "Disable GTK Double Buffering" and they will much less mechanical, this made all the difference for me.
    Hi Portus, is that what is causing the Circles to look like Polygons when you draw?

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  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Portus View Post
    If you want the brushes to be more responsive "Disable GTK Double Buffering" and they will much less mechanical, this made all the difference for me.
    How do you do this?

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  9. #8
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    It's in Help>Debug, it made the brushes have a more direct response in my system at least, you can read more in the link bellow, when I was drawing with double buffering it didn't seem to be real time when I was making big sweeping lines, if you have a powerful system it probably makes no difference. I can't read much from the technical jargon to be honest.

    http://people.gnome.org/~federico/mi...del/index.html

    Double buffering

    When the GTK layer receives an exposure event from GDK, it first finds the !GTK_NO_WINDOW widget that corresponds to the event's window. Then, it emits the expose-event signal for that widget. As described above, that widget will first draw its background, and then ask each of its GTK_NO_WINDOW children to draw themselves.

    If each of the drawing calls made by each subwidget's expose-event handler were sent directly to the windowing system, flicker could result. This is because areas may get redrawn repeatedly: the background, then decorative frames, then text labels, etc. To avoid flicker, GTK+ employs a double buffering system at the GDK level. Widgets normally don't know that they are drawing to an off-screen buffer; they just issue their normal drawing commands, and the buffer gets sent to the windowing system when all drawing operations are done.

    Two basic functions in GDK form the core of the double-buffering mechanism: gdk_window_begin_paint_region() and gdk_window_end_paint(). The first function tells a GdkWindow to create a temporary off-screen buffer for drawing. All subsequent drawing operations to this window get automatically redirected to that buffer. The second function actually paints the buffer onto the on-screen window, and frees the buffer.
    When is it convenient to disable double buffering? Generally, this is the case only if your widget gets drawn in such a way that the different drawing operations do not overlap each other. For example, this may be the case for a simple image viewer: it can just draw the image in a single operation. This would not be the case with a word processor, since it will need to draw and over-draw the page's background, then the background for highlighted text, and then the text itself.

    Even if you turn off the GTK_DOUBLE_BUFFERED flag on a widget, you can still call gdk_window_begin_paint_region() and gdk_window_end_paint() by hand to use temporary drawing buffers.
    Also check Ramon's new brush demos.



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  10. #9
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    I tried disabling that as you stated, and while the pen does seem to be more responsive, I still get those odd flat ends when making a circle with some of the tools.

    I tried this on multiple PCs with an intuos4, intuos3 same problem. Single and Dual monitors. Windows XP on a Duo Core 2gb ram, Windows 7 Ultimate with a Quad Core of 8gb of ram

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  11. #10
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    Does that happen with all the brushes? Don't seem to get that issue.

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  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    I tried disabling that as you stated, and while the pen does seem to be more responsive, I still get those odd flat ends when making a circle with some of the tools.

    I tried this on multiple PCs with an intuos4, intuos3 same problem. Single and Dual monitors. Windows XP on a Duo Core 2gb ram, Windows 7 Ultimate with a Quad Core of 8gb of ram
    i downloaded the demo of sketchbook pro by alias and i had this issue with that program, made it unusable.

    its time to knuckle down and really lick boot!
    LOOK MOMMY! I laid a sketchbook!
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  13. #12
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    Mostly the inking brushes, Portus. I have no idea why either.

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