Something just seems wrong. Critque please
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    Something just seems wrong. Critque please

    I have been drawing this for a friend of mine. It's one of my first times to ever really use perspective, and it just seems off to me. I can't determine why. So please critique it for me. I would love to hear peoples opinions on how I can improve it.



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    My first thought is that if that is a tail then it is coming out of his shoulder.

    And I know that this is only a quick sketch but there are some anatomical issues too, especially with his arms/hands and legs/feet.

    Keep going, I'd like to see where you take this one.

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    Haha, yeah it isn't a tail. The character is weird sort of creature and that is actually a tongue coming out of his shoulder.

    Please explain about the issues with the feet. I was worried that they might look wrong with the perspective that I'm trying.

    As for the arms and legs do you mean that they look to elongated?

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    To me it looks as though the feet are at different perspectives. We almost see one top down, while the other one seems to be pointed more to the side.

    Your drawing isn't exhibiting a lot of form. Rather, it seems very two dimensional and misunderstood as far as form goes for the human figure.

    "Cartoon" style is understood. Most people who draw "cartoons" well have a very good understanding of anatomy and how forms work. It's the exaggeration of the understood forms that makes their drawings "right". I don't feel that connection with your artwork. I recommend that you try and do some sort of anatomy study to understand the form of the human figure- to understand what you're abstracting.

    It's also a good idea to use conceptart.org's attachment manager to upload images, especially when such images are that small. Getting your thumbnail up is going to give you more views, and in return more replies from those who view.

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    The main thing that I think is... Perspective? I don't really see any. What are you trying to go for here? Also, is he standing on a flat surface?

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    Quigleyer
    Yeah I see what you mean about the feet.
    As for the anatomy I get where you are coming from. I had been doing gestures, but I admit that I started getting lazy and hadn't done them in awhile. I will go back to doing them until I'm more comfortable with the form. Also thank you for the advice about the site. I just signed up and the site seemed a little confusing to me.

    Bai Fan
    I understand what you are saying. As I continued to draw it I couldn't even see the perspective anymore...
    I was trying to go for a upper angle perspective. This is really my first time to ever attempt something like perspective so I'm still a beginner at it.

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    There are a couple of concepts that might help you here. First is boxing the figure out. Which is to say, draw a box around the figure in the perspective you want, that'll tell you how far off you have things. It also should help point the way to fixing them.

    The other is construction. This character doesn't really seem to have any, but it's a relatively straightforward concept, and you can start applying it with a little practice. Basically, you want to reduce the character to the simplest 3-D forms you can. Which means a ball for the hips, tapered cylinders for the legs, wedges for the feet, etc. Easy things to rotate. Think of your character standing upright, and think of the thigh as a cylinder. It's pretty simple to think of that rotated so you're looking at it from above, right? So the idea you're looking for is right there, and that should help you start understanding foreshortening.

    Studying perspective in its own right is a good idea too. Try this tutorial to get you started, it's quite good. Also, I'd recommend going through this page and this one. The style is different from what you're working with, but all of the concepts are the same. It's worth your while to learn from it.

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    Anatomy, proportion and detail my friend...

    Anyone can drop by any of my posts and leave a comment or crit I'll appreciate it.

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    Nezumi Works
    Thank you very much for the links. I will make it a point to read through them.

    I guess what I'm finding after all of these comments is that I was treating this more as just a little sketch and not so much as a finished piece. I think I am going to go back and try to redraw it while using new techniques.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaftPassion View Post
    Quigleyer
    Yeah I see what you mean about the feet.
    As for the anatomy I get where you are coming from. I had been doing gestures, but I admit that I started getting lazy and hadn't done them in awhile. I will go back to doing them until I'm more comfortable with the form. Also thank you for the advice about the site. I just signed up and the site seemed a little confusing to me.
    Gestures are a great way to get the figure down in its simplest form. I don't discourage you from this practice whatsoever, but please understand that there is more than a contour to the human body. Everything in between must be understood as well.

    The basic frame for the body is the skeleton, of course. All form is understood on top of that. Muscles and connective tissues come from that and so on and so forth.

    Gestures are even better understood so long as you understand these muscles and the way they connect to the skeleton. This information informs your contour and makes it more "accurate."

    With that said I don't want you to think I'm telling you that the best piece of advice I have for you is to draw everything from the skeleton up, but rather to study and understand everything from the skeleton up. This takes many studies and is really a life endeavor more than a weekend vacation.

    If you take the time out of your day to do a 15 minutes study of one part of the body every day you increase your chances greatly of understanding the forms you're trying to describe, abstractly or "less abstractly" (I personally believe all representative art is an abstraction of something real).

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  13. #11
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    It does not look like we're viewing him from a high perspective. Instead, it just looks like he's hunched over and we're looking at him straight-on.

    There are many reasons it appears this way. Pay attention to the waistline, the feet, and the leg-to-body ratio on the images I've attached.

    -Waistline: Yours is drawn perfectly straight, as if we are looking at it head-on. There should be a fairly dramatic curve to it.
    -Feet: It looks like we are seeing one of them from the side, but this should not be happening.
    -Legs: Legs are normally about half a person's total height when viewed from head-on. Yours are only slightly shorter than this -- not enough to sell the top-down view you're going for. When viewed from an extreme perspective, the legs should appear much shorter.

    As always, use reference when you're uncertain of something.

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    Quigleyer
    I had heard about studying the skeleton and muscles before, but I never did it out of laziness. I guess this is a clear sign to stop avoiding it and actually do it. Can you recommend a good website for studying the structure?

    Soulweaver
    Thank you very much for the pictures! Like I said before I guess I ended up treating this picture more like a sketch then a finished picture. After looking at the pictures I can clearly see where I went wrong.

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  16. #13
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    If you want to study structure and anatomy, one of the most accessible references I know is George Bridgeman's Constructive Anatomy. It's clearly written with an artist in mind, so if you study that (and keep up the gestures) you'll progress quickly, I think.

    One thing, by study I don't mean read. I mean draw. Take a fresh sketchbook and start drawing what you see in his book (or whatever book you're working from). Make sure you lable what the source is on the pages, of course. You're an artist, and that usually means you learn with your hands at least as much as your eyes, so you're likely to absorb a lot of information that way. Same with those cartooning/structure references I gave you earlier. Not to mention, the main way to get better at art is pencil mileage. The more lines you draw, the more shapes you describe, the better you'll be in the end.

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