I purposely do not finish my art
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: I purposely do not finish my art

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    I purposely do not finish my art

    I begin with a vision. I may or may not come close to completing this, then I stop because I like the art better in theory than what my own hands could do. Is there something wrong with this and I should finish or should I keep leaving half-finished products?

    This is only for recreation, but I would like to see one finished piece for once that I feel comfortable with (I completed actually one or two years ago).

    Xeno's Sketchbook.
    Please take a look and comment
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,432
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You stop because if you never finish it you have the convenient excuse of "Oh, it's not finished, it would have been cool if I'd finished it.."

    Nobody ever hits that vision in their head, unless they aimed low..

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    191
    Thanks
    79
    Thanked 87 Times in 44 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The point of developing your skills is EXACTLY to be able to execute your ideas AS CLEAR as they are in your mind, if your piece doesn`t make the idea justice and you feel it`s not well executed, you need to keep developing yourself; but abandoning the piece is lazy, you have to keep going AT LEAST until it`s a little better than the last one, that`s the way you progress, if you abandon it before, you will be stuck forever.

    That`s the secret of developing oneself! :when you finish a piece, take a look at it and ask yourself: does it look better than the last one? if the answer is no... then keep working on it, and keep repeating the same question until the answer is at least a "definitely yes", then you`re on the right path!, just keep doing that with every piece and NEVER leave a piece until -it`s better than the last one-, this should be like a fucking commandment to you, and you will never be stuck.

    Last edited by Chris Saksida; April 7th, 2010 at 09:42 PM.
    The Light and Dark Arts of Cristian Saksida
    Portfolio:http://www.chrissaksida.com
    Blog:http://cristiansaksidaarts.blogspot.com
    Twitter:http://twitter.com/crissaksida
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Chris Saksida For This Useful Post:


  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,432
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    That said, sometimes you are just trying to polish a turd.

    I'm on my 3rd attempt at a painting that is just not working, probably never worked and it's going in the bin tomorrow.

    I've given it a fair crack, time to wreck it and move on.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Flake For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Wow thanks. I've had some crappy going nowhere pieces that I binned before. But I'm talking about the promising ones. I understand what you are saying Flake, perhaps I stop because I don't want to disappoint myself with it completed? But then again, it shouldn't be complete if I'm not satisfied with it is also your point.
    I think I'm figuring things out with the advice you two gave me .
    You've helped a lot more than you could imagine. <- added

    Xeno's Sketchbook.
    Please take a look and comment
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,432
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You should be cool that your ambitions are higher than your current skills.

    You can practice moving your hands , opening your eyes and engaging yer brain daily to get better skills.

    "WAX ON! WAX OFF!""

    Last edited by Flake; April 7th, 2010 at 10:06 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    717
    Thanks
    932
    Thanked 291 Times in 208 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You can only do your best. Just give it a go! If it turns out bad, there's always next time. Then the next etc

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,878
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 630 Times in 400 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ego preservation is a disease that's not particularly usefull if you want to imrove in art it's a problem because people tie being judged and their feelings of importance to how good or bad thier work is. Some people might avoid the obvious by just not producing what they have been learning to do. That's lying to yourself and avoiding facts like, it might need work etc. Instead we cultivate a fictive idea about "I can do it, if I wanted to". I have done that forever Well.. I don't believe that, anymore, prove it. I'm trying it and it's just not that easy, certain things need practice, but trying's not enough. You might get it eventually but at some point you have to "come out of the box" and stop wasting valluable time.

    Join the challenge arena's or CHOW's or COW's, it's giving me a much needed "break" and reality check.

    What you need is not a fake self image but something to work and improve on and some soft skills with handling reality as that's part of the deal.

    It's a weekly facillity and I think it's there,... to be used.


    I have already picke up some crap, the lounge is allways full of it. Stuff like.. I can't please everyone,... Yes but you have to learn to please someone, especially a client. Pretend the judges is the client.

    You have to filter for people's crap or you might end up in "that box" of apples.

    Stop being a BOX CRAWLER.

    Bwahahahahaha!!!

    Last edited by George Abraham; April 10th, 2010 at 07:31 AM.
    ----------------------------------
    Scetchbook: View the exhibitionist's stuff.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    St.lucia
    Posts
    190
    Thanks
    17
    Thanked 27 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    good read here, i often feel that way sometimes, makes me hate myself for not wanting what i wanted to do in the first place. Its almost like a disease and it can spread into even your social life and other stuff. hope you take what these guys said into good consideration and thanks on your part for posting this, shows you have guts and have taken your first 2 steps into battling the problem.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    57
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I also have a problem with not finishing my artwork (or anything else for that matter), and some recent self-analyzing and talking to other people (something else I rarely do) has led me to a new conclusion for why I don't finish pieces.

    Apparently other people (most people?) seem to remember things/events/people visually. I do not. This started as a conversation with someone who said they had an odd dream - it wasn't in color. I was confused, as not only are my dreams not in color, they very rarely have any visual aspect at all. I might dream that I went to the corner store, and bought a Pepsi in a blue can, but I don't actually "see" the store or the can, its just thoughts, like reading a book, its information, details, I rarely visualize what I read in books. I also don't tend to visualize any memories, you say orange, and I don't picture an orange, but I'm beginning to think that many people do visualize most remembered things on a regular basis.

    But at the same time, I can visualize. I just don't do it instinctively, or particularly well. I believe that the need to visualize is a major factor in my drawing or sketching. I have a concept, I want to "see" it, visualize it, but I have trouble forming a mental picture, so I begin to draw/sketch until I can "see" it clearly in my mind. Once I can, the sketch has achieved its purpose, I don't need to add any more information, so I stop.

    I find that my memory of information, visual or not, is greatest when I write or draw it. It seems that using my hands is necessary for me to remember. I believe this is also the reason while I tend to touch things, objects, walls, shelves, as I move through places, I know subconsciously that tactile input is necessary for my memory. Which is why I can remember a floorplan of a building, without remembering what the place looks like. Unless I make a conscious effort, I don't remember visuals. (and even then I don't remember well)

    Sorry to get off topic, just posting my recent opinion on why I have had the same problem with not finishing pieces.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    So-Cal
    Posts
    3,427
    Thanks
    2,994
    Thanked 1,780 Times in 849 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I looked at your sketchbook and I immediately knew why you don't finish your work. It's because you are starting wrong. So I think you shouldn't worry about "finishing". Just worry about starting. Once you have that shit under control, then you can stress the "finish".

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Raoul Duke For This Useful Post:


  15. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon_Lyle View Post
    I find that my memory of information, visual or not, is greatest when I write or draw it. It seems that using my hands is necessary for me to remember. I believe this is also the reason while I tend to touch things, objects, walls, shelves, as I move through places, I know subconsciously that tactile input is necessary for my memory. Which is why I can remember a floorplan of a building, without remembering what the place looks like. Unless I make a conscious effort, I don't remember visuals. (and even then I don't remember well)
    Just a thought, but maybe you'd do well working in 3D? (If you aren't already...) My Dad is a very tactile thinker and he likes to do all his "sketches" in 3D...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Louisiana
    Posts
    57
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I have been playing with 3D, but probably not in the way you mean. I've been playing with taking a photograph and making a stereo copy of it. (so when you look cross-eyed, its in 3D). I'm assuming that you mean some sort of modeling. I never had much luck with clay, but I have played at woodcarving. I don't recall finishing those either. I believe tactile involvement is necessary for me to develop ideas fully, but once I do visualize the concept, I lose interest; in my mind - its finished.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm assuming that you mean some sort of modeling. I never had much luck with clay, but I have played at woodcarving. I don't recall finishing those either. I believe tactile involvement is necessary for me to develop ideas fully, but once I do visualize the concept, I lose interest; in my mind - its finished.
    I was thinking maybe 3D software... but from what you say it sounds like it's a different problem entirely.

    Maybe what you need is some really compelling reason to show what's in your mind to other people. Since the only way you can show what's in your head is by finishing something, maybe a strong desire to show what you're thinking would motivate you to finish.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    US
    Posts
    128
    Thanks
    65
    Thanked 36 Times in 24 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ever give "Art and Fear" a quick read? Might be something you would be interested in Jon Lyle.

    As for stopping at the idea...I don't think there is much that can help that.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 3 Times in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I believe what Leonardo da Vinci have said: " Art is never finished, only abandoned." As far as I know he hasn`t finished most of his works (including Mona Lisa), but remains the greatest of all. Picaso also says that perfect means dead. Can`t a picture really be continually improved and what does it mean to be completed?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #17
    TASmith's Avatar
    TASmith is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Slovakia
    Posts
    4,169
    Thanks
    5,094
    Thanked 2,049 Times in 1,108 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I purposely didn't read this thread. Sorry, carry on.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. The Following User Says Thank You to TASmith For This Useful Post:


  22. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Frisco (Dallas), TX
    Posts
    55
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hm, I'm slightly different here. I don't finish work for a variety of reasons, the most common being 1. The picture bored me (if I don't finish a sketch in under thirty minutes I move on; I'm forcing it at that point and my forced work looks awful), 2. I don't have the skills to finish the picture (inking and coloring come to mind here), 3. I find finishing things to be terrifying and not worthy of my time (I'm known for getting to the climax of a video game but never finishing it).

    It's been a bit of my bane, actually. I had thought I had improved in the past month or two but I've not. I've not regressed, but I've not gotten too much better. Oh well, tis life.

    Perhaps you should start small? Try finishing a smaller piece before attempting anything grander? Even if it's something small, finishing something and doing it well is often a good way to start.

    My Sketchbook-Deviant Art - Livejournal

    "Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional." - Buddhist Saying
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Bucharest, Romania
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 19 Times in 14 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I definitely think you need to start small. Put down in text in detail your visions and save them for when you'll have the skill to create them and get close to what you intended to do. Until then set smaller manageable goals for yourself, but always aim high and always go back and review what you work on with a fresh eye and fix whatever bothers you. Otherwise if you jump into something that is too much you might not be happy with the result and that could lead to dissapointment and losing interest.

    Also, breaking everything into small chunks and working one at a time is what keeps me out of boredom if I try to finish something, because I want to see something done as soon as possible.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •