Art: The Gray Wolf
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Thread: The Gray Wolf

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    The Gray Wolf

    Total newbie here, so bear with me, hopefully I won't break any etiquette.

    I've started a sculpture of my idea of a character from the story by George MacDonald called "The Gray Wolf". She is basically a werewolf, but I am choosing to accentuate her wolfish features with long hands and feet with claws.

    First time using sculpey, I'm enjoying it, but unfortunately I've been having problems with my armature. I've decided to press on, because this is mostly for myself and for learning purposes and there are many more stages where I could mess up!

    Very rough stages..



    Where I am now..



    Here you can see the main problem with the armature- my foil base was far too wide, it looks like she's nesting on an egg!

    Also, the wire sticks out on her wrist, but I might be able to trim that once it's baked?

    Anyway, sorry for the long starting post, thankyou if you've gotten through all that. I've been absolutely spellbound here going through other people's threads- what a treasure trove!

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    Last edited by Shona; April 12th, 2010 at 07:18 PM.
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    Welcome - well done!

    Yes it seems we all have to deal with armatures sticking out of limbs - or hands that wont stick to the armature. You are learning from your problems and that is the most important.

    For some reason all my armatures seems to grow inside the clay - but it might just be a question about experience.

    Your anatomy is all right (not yours of course - the wolf-lady) - but your first sculpture is really about getting a feeling for the clay, the &%¤¤## armature and learning how not to burn your sculpture beyond recognition in the oven.

    In the beginning it might be slightly less difficult if you have a photo or drawing of what you want to achieve - that way you can train your ability to create exactly what you have in mind.

    You are Doing fine - have fun - post plenty!

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    Ready to be baked (I am scared about the baking part, I can burn toast, I've nearly set fire to our flat twice... maybe I'll ask my flatmate to cook it for me!!)

    What I've found the hardest is that this whole thing was a bit wobbly to work on, and so towards the end, as things were finishing up, I would be working on one bit and ruining another with my fingers as I held on to it.

    There are also so many flaws in the anatomy that don't look so bad, then when I take a photo they stick out a mile. *sigh*

    It's been fun anyway, I'll definitely stick with it, I've got another pack and a half of sculpey to use up at least!

    Last edited by Shona; March 24th, 2010 at 03:35 PM.
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    Smile

    Yay, baked, no problems. Although I broke the wrist when I removed that annoying piece of wire, oops. Hopefully a bit of paint will hide the now kinda gluey join, ha.

    She feels so nice! I just want to rub her spine. Can't wait to get a little colour on her.

    Now, how about a photo where I haven't forgotten to put my ISO back to auto?

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    You can always freeze the SS for 15 min before adding a new part - that way it will be harder to squeeze the parts you have already finished.

    You might consider - if you decide to stay with this hobby - to switch to Super Sculpey Firm - which is harder to deform by accident.

    Good looking - nice hair. Smooth it over with a wet finger, and later some spirits.

    Stay with us ;-)

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    You can always freeze the SS for 15 min before adding a new part - that way it will be harder to squeeze the parts you have already finished.

    You might consider - if you decide to stay with this hobby - to switch to Super Sculpey Firm - which is harder to deform by accident.

    Good looking - nice hair. Smooth it over with a wet finger, and later some spirits.

    Stay with us ;-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aseyngel View Post
    You can always freeze the SS for 15 min before adding a new part - that way it will be harder to squeeze the parts you have already finished.

    You might consider - if you decide to stay with this hobby - to switch to Super Sculpey Firm - which is harder to deform by accident.

    Good looking - nice hair. Smooth it over with a wet finger, and later some spirits.

    Stay with us ;-)
    Yes, good tips all. That's why I came here, thanks for replying!

    Unfortunately she will have to stay lumpy, poor girl.

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    I feel kinda bad bumping this up to the top when there are so many awesome new things up there worthy of more attention, but I don't think I will be totally happy until I've completed this thread right the way through!

    I finally found a little time to get a bit of paint on her, and I made a little GIF animation for a 360 view.

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    Mostly for me:

    Cons
    -I hate the way I did the eyes, but I've seen some excellent eyes on here, the technique for which I may *cough* steal *cough*
    -Urgh, anatomy issues. Her neck was never quite right, her arms and legs are wonky lengths, her head is too large.
    -Learn how to make an armature before you start another one!!

    Pros
    -Chunky hair
    -Lovely lips
    -Rubable spine
    -Creepy

    Thanks for all the inspiration guys, hopefully I can do another one of these soon!

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    Creepy and cool for a first time!!I am a noob too!!I was going to say the same pros and cons you realized.You solved in a great way the problem with the excess of foil under her bottom.
    Why don´t you bake two small balls of sculpey to use as eyes?Or to small balls of epoxy.They will be not affected by the sculpting action around them!

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    I like the eye's as they are creepy. I'm trying to use beads for the eye's on my character (a tip mentions by many others on CA) so keep an eye on my first wip for how that goes. The pose is a great start as the arm touching the floor has a look that its weighted by balancing her body.
    A crit (if you dont mind) would be her arm on her knees looks uncomfortable, which if you were to lower er elbow a little might have worked or better yet maybe look at some advice given to amature photographers on how to pose a model. I remember it being useful for how to make an image of someone look more at ease.

    While typing this advise, I realised I should use it myself.

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