Ink Chow (help!)
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  1. #1
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    Ink Chow (help!)

    I'm struggling with this week's CHOW, and need help today. I wanted to light the character from below, but then screwed up completely with the robes/pants area. I think I identified a big area, and pointed out where the light was supposed to be coming from. Any help greatly appreciated.

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    What your noticing is the pants have different lighting than the rest of the painting.

    But as a whole your lighting is inaccurate and inconsistent.

    put on some sweat pants turn the lights off, get a light and a mirror, and notice how the light falls and hits the form.

    Depending on where your light is and how intense the background may need to be darker. The back foot should be darker and the lighting on the face is mostly okay. the torso is being lit straight on and the pants is from above.

    The bench/ thing he is sitting on also needs some attention, it has straight on lighting. As for your highlights and shadows you need some color in them. Remember don't just add in white or black. put in the skin tone, the color of the light, and some of the background color.

    I love the detailing you have in there and the arm is close to perfect.

    Keep up the good work.

    Simple is not Easy.
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    Treat the whole subject as a three-dimensional, solid form. Don't try to guess the lighting. Calculate it. What is closest to the light? What is farthest? Which surfaces are perpendicular to it? Which ones are at an angle? Which ones are parallel? Which ones are facing backwards? Where do the the shadows fall?

    Making a sketch of the scene from the *light*'s POV may help a lot in difficult cases like this, but you need the volume figured out very well for it to work.

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    I may be wrong but I m guessing you were trying to make it look as if the light was coming from the right-hand corner, in front of the character and
    shining upwards. If the light was supposed to be different then, sorry it isn't clear in the image.

    Below is a paintover where the light is more clear as to it's origin.

    Some tips. When you must painting on your image in large masses and 'block in' the light and shade. This has many reasons for being but you should be
    careful that when you look at your image you see where the light is coming from and how it is basically falling on your object.

    In essence, just like a high-contrast black and white inked image, you should be able to look at it in general, and at every area in particular, and be able to
    tell where your primary lightsource is coming from. It must be clear, set in stone. Forget secondary lightsources, reflected light etc.

    When at this stage think of everything as big cubic boxes and think 'top-side of head box...lit? Yes...here's the color. Left side of headbox...lit? No,
    shadow" Start that way. Think the same when doing studies from life. In a while you won't need to think of the masses as objects anymore and you'll be
    able to see and paint more during this stage. But for now, do it as suggested. Then proceed with what arenhaus said.

    This was, I believe, your main issue with this image. You went in there and threw colors all around and tried to put all your light in the image, along with
    halftone and shadow, almost all at once. Don't do that. Don't be fooled by WIPs from pros, they are generally doing what I described, and if they can
    handle a little more, it's because they have done it 200 million times and their mind stays focused and doesn't forget all that should be going on. Even then
    they take it one step at a time.

    Next, don't forget your shadows. In such and image, there are plenty of shadows. Dark ones too. They help define the atmosphere and they can help
    you define a form! Form needn't be defined only by halftone, cast shadow can do an awesome job too!

    Lastly, in this image, there are anatomy issues, but that's another story. I'll only mention the leg on the lefthand side that seems deformed and shorter in
    total legth than the other ones' thigh. I assume you may want to suggest a genetic deformity at that part of the character. If so, make it more clear.
    Show that deformed limb. Otherwise, fix it.

    There was alot more that needs to be painted in but I am suggesting the general idea, if that's what you had in mind. If I'm right then you can see and
    find the rest and paint it in the way you want them to be.

    Oh and, I got carried away and used a little cooler colors in the halftones on the paintover, making the pants more red than orange. Sorry about that.

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