2 Years On - Wannabe Comic Artist (Almost Finished College)
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    2 Years On - Wannabe Comic Artist (Almost Finished College)

    Hey everybody....It's been near on 2 years since I last posted here. Since then I have been to college and learnt a great deal of many things. Now college is almost over I wish to put more into my own work. But I have some questions....

    Wanting to mainly do comic books I am wondering about getting a portfolio together. So, for a comic book artists portfolio, Is it ok to include pin-ups and sequentials of existing characters such as, Spiderman, Superman, Batman etc...I don't mean copied from other artists but in my own fashion?

    For study material should I stay with Loomis, Bridgman and Hogarth? Or can books such as "How to draw the Marvel way" and "Drawing Cutting Edge Comics" be a viable source of study?

    I would like a pretty sharp portfolio for taking to conventions next year.

    Here is a link to my very old and deceased sketchbook thread from 2 years ago

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=128737

    And this is a little something that I did for a friend at work last week...Just thought I'd include this to get a little scope on how things have come along in these years. I have also drawn a portrait of one of my other friends from work, but I don't want to upload that until she has received it. Sorry if this sounds a little off the cuff, it's just something I have been wondering for a while..

    Also, yes, I would like to start a new sketchbook thread very soon...Thank you for your time.

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    Here's a tip: if you're going to copy other artists' works for your portfolio, avoid using cover images.

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    Yes I agree..and that I would obviously do. I wouldn't be copying other artists work for my portfolio. This was something that my friend wanted doing. I uploaded it for comparison against my earlier stuff. Eddy Barrows originally pencilled this right? Also on that note, could copying others comic work be likened to that of master studies?

    Last edited by Sketchie; March 20th, 2010 at 04:42 PM.
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    The problem with copying other people's comics is that you'll be imitating some stylized $#!* anatomy like that Superman. Those are some totally screwed-up hands. Just do figure drawing until your fingers bleed and you'll eventually come up with your own style based on solid understanding of 3-dimensional form & structure. More importantly, draw some stories so you understand how the medium works.

    Some good books to study for comic art:
    Scott McCloud - Understanding Comics, Reinventing Comics, Making Comics
    Jessica Abel & Matt Madden - Drawing Words & Writing Pictures
    Will Eisner - Comics and Sequential Art
    David Chelsea - Perspective for Comic Artists

    You should focus mainly on sequentials for your portfolio, unless you want to do covers, in which case you should do CHOW here every week. I think it's probably fine to use existing characters, as long as you have a bit of original stuff in the mix somewhere -- though you might consider the possibility that Marvel may not be thrilled to see DC characters and vice versa.

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    What mickeymao said. Copying comics will laden you with quirks.

    In that copy you're not just faking anatomy - you're faking someone else's faking of anatomy.

    Study how the real thing works, then you'll be able to stylize it the way you need, not the way someone else needed or even simply evolved unconsciously. What worked for someone else may be not so successful for you.

    The idea that you need to limit yourself to three books is silly. Read whatever you want, but be critical of what you read. Not all of what Loomis or Hogarth say will be useful, either. Learn to discern. Compare what different authors say. Glean insights.

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    I've heard that you should tailor your portfolio to the company you're applying to. So if you're applying to Marvel, they're going to be way more interested in what you can do with Wolverine than what you can do with Superman. Also, a lot of people can do a superhero standing around looking pretty, so pinups are unlikely to help your cause. A comic company is going to be more interested in sequentials, since that's what they'll likely have you doing.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

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    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Do you folks honestly think that a DC editor won't hire you just because you have Wolverine in your samples, or vice versa?


    Tristan Elwell
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    I know that by copying will laden me with quirks. Like I mentioned it was something a friend wanted doing. For fun. So I said yes. I only uploaded it as an example, as I feel my pencil control is better than it used to be. I understand that I shouldn't really learn anatomy from comics themselves. I will go ahead and push those anatomy studies from sources that people have recommended on here. Maybe I got off on the wrong foot here, and for that I apologise. You have all put down very legitimate responses.

    I'm just concerned about what I should be including in my portfolio. Maybe Spidey? Wolverine? Batman? Are these classic characters good to put in if they are drawn in 'my' way? I have a few sample scripts from various publishers websites too...i'm guessing these would be good to include. I'm looking at a year if not 2 to get this together. Including study time.

    arenhaus - Thanks
    vineris - thanks
    Elwell - Thank you

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    Jovian M is offline HOW MANY PUSH-UPS CAN YOU DO? Level 7 Gladiator: Samnite
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    Find a script you like, online. One that you haven't seen published so you have nothing to directly refer to.

    Draw that script.

    Bring that shit to conventions. And if you're awesome, you'll find work. But honestly, right now, based on that drawing of Superman you did (with reference, no less), you're nowhere near publishable. DRAW YOUR TITS OFF. Study your brains out.

    Find another script. Waka waka.

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    Or just look on your target company's website and you may find they have provided a sample script. Here, for example, down in the Artist's Guidelines for Dark Horse they have provided a script in both .pdf and Word format. http://www.darkhorse.com/Company/Submissions I can see you said you have some of those sample scripts. It seems like it would be a no brainer to try some of those.

    Let's face it. If you nail the same script the interviewing company has posted as an example of something you should be able to do, well I guess you darn well showed them you could do it.

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