Creating and colouring environments
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    Creating and colouring environments

    I'm just fishing for advice really but got a few projects which require the construction of rundown buildings and far futuristic cities.

    I'm going through a perspective book by Loomis which is excellent but I'm hoping to create a few images digitally. I've seen various techniques on here like using a grid for perspective and so on but I've always been nervous about how to colour it all.

    The general technique seems to be create a very vague shape and then cut in it, almost like sculpture. Would it be applied to creating landscapes as well or are there better ways to go about it?

    It seems as if I'm answering my own question but I'm just seeing if I'm going about the creation of environments in the right way.

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    When I'm designing anything I start with gathering info first. I usually base it on info about race, environment, how technologically advanced. So a reptile like race living in a desert environment on a planet circling a double star. They have space flight and have colonized other planets in their system. You pull materials from that information. For buildings start with shape, will you use boxes, spheres pyramids as an underlying theme? Organic or non organic tech? Maybe they manipulate silicate to the nth degree what does that look like? All that stuff gives you the power to create a believable cohesive idea. It will stand or fall on the thought and creativity you put into it.

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    Cheers Dpaint that's a great help, however I have a lot of the background information from the client.

    What I meant was basically how to technically go about creating the landscape, getting the colours and perspective right, shadows, highlights and so on. I suppose I should just keep searching threads and look for WIPs as their doesn't seem like any hard and fast rules.

    I just need more training/confidence in the art of colour really.

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    Values for Landscape painting

    I can give you basics that will work for most situations
    In sunlight. halftone is the middle of the value scale or 4.5 on a 9 scale system (pigment) the reason I use the word halftone instead of numeric value is to allow for keying the painting for individual scenes. Always work from the middle outward. Color is not mentioned because it is dependant on local color of objects.

    Average upright shadow plane 2steps below halftone
    this should be dark enough to accomodate saturation light enough to have air

    Ground plane in shadow is 1 step below halftone orgainze and simplify to fit into one value

    Average upright Sunlight mass 1 step above halftone

    Average sunlight ground plane 2 steps above halftone

    Bottom 2 values reserve for underplanes where there is no reflected light.

    Sky is 3 steps above halftone to 4 steps at horizon

    Atmosphere depends on angle of light and altitude but you can use an easy rule of thumb for most stuations by dividing the scene into planes of reference foreground middle ground, background sky Using the above information divide the colors of the foreground with the sky background color/value to arrive at an average for the middle ground colors

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    There is more of this stuff for specific scenes, moonlight dusk,dawn.cloudy days. If anyone else wants to share John Osborne info. Anyone else study landscape with Osborne, or Mason? I also have A. Dorian's notes on landscape which I haven't tried, they are a little different being from the Reilly school and not the DuMond School of painting.

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