Colour and Composition excersises

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  1. #1
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    Colour and Composition excersises

    Hello!

    I've been training a bit since my last thread and (hopefully) made some progress, but you judge.

    I am still mostly concerned about colors, although I have been playing around with composition a bit in the last 3 pictures and tried some variations..

    So what do you think about the use of color / composition?

    Thank you!

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  3. #2
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    When you copy from a photo, you essentially have your color and composition delivered to you by the photo. There's nothing to comment about.

    The rest makes me think that you're probably getting ahead of yourself here. You have the technique, but you need better structure to the drawing. More solidity to the volumes, even in extreme caricature, is the key. When you aren't using a photo to copy from, your drawing structure "wobbles". Work on that.

    As for composition - I don't see much of that. Simple placement of the subject on the page; composition means relationship between the parts of a picture. There is the beginning of that in the last image - the one with background - a simple, symmetrical, stable and static one.

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    really nice work mate ..... which software did u use ? thanx

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    So, arenhaus, how do I achieve more solidity to the volumes? Darker darks and brighter brights or better lighting scenarios or something else?

    Agrmrs, I just used photoshop..

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    I've been instructed by a pro concept artist to try duplicating photos - there are things to be learned from it.

    I'm going to assume the cartoon character wasn't copied from a photo.

    IMO you could push the tones and saturation further. Keep practicing and it'll fall into place.

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    I really like the one of the man, you've got the dark skin tone and the texturing very well, for the others I suggest you working on your blending, look up a few blending tutorials, create some new blending brushes, and yes I agree with upping the saturation a bit, that may also come with time and practice. Keep at it. It'll help if you save your progress as well and look at how you arrive at the final and if you went wrong, where you went wrong and all of that.

    Last edited by Rhdnor; March 12th, 2010 at 12:51 AM.
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    Duplicating photos only works as studying method if you have a clear goal to learn something specific - in which case you often don't even need to duplicate the actual photo.

    Solidity is about the combination of two things: 3-D form in perspective, and lighting. Get either one wrong, and no amount of technique will make it realistic.

    The perspective is easy enough - just be careful in constructing the form before you paint and check it constantly while you paint. Lighting is more pertinent to painting, and is about getting the tonal relationships just right. You might have no detail in shadows for a dramatic look, or the opposite - transparent shadows for a more romantic look, for example. But in both cases light must be light and shadow must be shadow.

    It often helps to sketch in 5 gradations of gray, black, white, midtone, and 2 in between to get the hang of that. You can pick the "shadow" point at any step, and a good rule of thumb is keeping the lightest shadow tone clearly darker than the darkest light tone.

    I can't really judge how good your tone is, but I can see you need more awareness of the 3D form. Look at your "goblin": no photo, and your form and lighting fell apart. Cartoons need solidity no less than realism.

    Don't just copy a photo; figure out what the form is, and why the light falls on it this way. Construct a wireframe drawing, check the form, only then paint. It will improve the way you work with photographs, and wean you off the dependence of them.

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    Thanks,

    I will definitely try to get some better saturation to my next painting and try out some blending methods. But first and foremost I will reconsider the solidity of the volume as arenhaus instructed. Seems like a solid plan.

    Btw, what exactly would you mean by "blending"? Wouldn't a too smooth surface kill the texture of the object?

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    Here's the pro artist who told me about copying from photos -

    Christian Lorenz Scheurer

    Pretty successful by anyone's measure.

    He was trying to teach himself to see all the subtle colors in an image, sounds like what Dalai is looking for.

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    if you can learn as you go through it rather than just painting what you see then it becomes much more valuable too. There are some things you would gain intuitively I think. Keep it up tho, good way to practice!

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    *shrug* Photos are a useful tool if you use them intelligently. Simple duplication is missing the whole point of exercise.

    I looked at Scheurer. Interesting, though I am not enamored by his use of frantic minute "greebling" everywhere. I prefer work with more clarity to it.

    I am not sure how much photos helped him. He shows precious few pictures that could make it clear how he constructs his form, and he smothers nearly everything in texture.

    Last edited by arenhaus; March 13th, 2010 at 04:41 AM.
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    Thanks for getting the link, Jack the R, this swiss guy sounds interesting! Although I didn't quite get the message how I would use it to improve my own work.

    Well I found that especially duplicating photos helps realising how important the right use of colour is. I found it quite easy to go far astray from the original photo although the palette basically shipped with it. Well since I got better it must mean that it actually helped.. Anyway I will reconsider the volume as I said and try out some new different techniques!

    Nevertheless, I hope I find some time real soon to get some more paintings done!

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    Colour and Composition excersises

    thats the way i was thinking but Ive seen other pictures where there is virtually no colour at all, like photos on misty days and I love that look. Can anyone show me how to improve the picture?

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