7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 29 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    10,007,461
    Thanks
    332
    Thanked 1,198 Times in 254 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta

    These 7 pages were sold in an e-bay auction a few years back.

    I saved the scans from the post.
    i don't know why he scanned them so big for the auction, but thank god!

    7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta
    7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta
    7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta
    7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta
    7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta
    7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta
    7 original comic pages from Frank Frazetta

    Hope you like.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following 23 Users Say Thank You to davi For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  4. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    333
    Thanks
    90
    Thanked 58 Times in 49 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    coooooooooooool

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    10,007,461
    Thanks
    332
    Thanked 1,198 Times in 254 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,134
    Thanks
    8,227
    Thanked 5,581 Times in 1,786 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Many thanks for these, my little rabbit turd. Lovely pieces. They're also an excellent example of why you shouldn't use rubber cement and self-adhesives on archival art...

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    410
    Thanks
    525
    Thanked 477 Times in 158 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ho ho! Thanks!

    SECONDS: Do you work from life of photographs?
    FRAZETTA: I work from my head.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    2,979
    Thanks
    1,144
    Thanked 1,473 Times in 722 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    awesome, thanks davi! only thing I can't say I care for are some of the goofy expressions on the close-ups, but other than that, it's great to see more work by the master.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Vasa, Finland
    Posts
    2,590
    Thanks
    3,490
    Thanked 1,209 Times in 438 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Man, you gotta love comics writing back then. Mighty white man kill evil monkey lord!

    Thanks for these, they're a piece of history for sure.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,531
    Thanks
    104
    Thanked 1,848 Times in 598 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Really nice, what a master. Actually the art auction sites (the dedicated ones) are a really good place to find hi-res scans of art such as Frazetta's. For example..

    comics.ha.com

    Depends what's being sold at the time, of course, and often you need to be a member to see the full scans. Personally I was too fearful to bid on anything, those art auction sites are not friendly places if you don't know what you're doing.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Baron Impossible For This Useful Post:


  12. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,076
    Thanks
    1,516
    Thanked 5,159 Times in 1,706 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I would steal these with a backhoe.

    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  14. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    dilli, India
    Posts
    4,560
    Thanks
    2,353
    Thanked 1,440 Times in 766 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    comicartfans.com is another good site for good scans and stuff.
    Thanks Davi for the post

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to bhanu For This Useful Post:


  16. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    599
    Thanks
    415
    Thanked 530 Times in 246 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I personally am in love with the bottom two panels. Wonderful!
    Thanks a lot.

    My Sketchbook

    frazmctag@gmail.com
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    551
    Thanks
    72
    Thanked 228 Times in 148 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    I would steal these with a backhoe.
    Mr Ferrara you just made my week!!!

    The work is awesome. It's also nice to see the originals. It kinda brings the work a tad down to earth, reproductions looking all sleek and toned with the same black value seem unreachable sometimes.

    It's also nice to see that even Frazetta made mistakes. Not that anyone thought otherwise but it's nice to see that he did and wasn't afraid of mistakes.

    I have two questions for those who my know more.

    1)On page 2 the first frame has this cut-out shape, this might have been the result of a change in the frame so I guess they pasted it on the main image and redrew over it. Was this common practice? Do they do it today? I never saw this before.

    2)What kind of paint is the white paint they use to cover up the ink and redraw over it? I got some white 'ink' thing once that was supposed to do the trick, but it's useless, it's too transparent.

    "Don't judge a book by it's cover" Frank Frazetta 1928-2010
    RIP Frank.

    DA gallery http://michaelsyrigos.deviantart.com/gallery/

    CA Sketchbook http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=131601
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,134
    Thanks
    8,227
    Thanked 5,581 Times in 1,786 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    There are actually a number of paste-overs (mostly typo corrections), and yes, it's not only quite common but probably the rule for comic art. Most people think that original art for reproduction is a pristine piece of archival art with perfect everything. Bullshit.

    I've seen entire pages made up of pasted tissue paper drawings with as many as five overlaps in some places, with the balloons or text pasted in over top of that. That's the primary reason that original comic art is so rare--rubber cement and tracing paper/typing paper deteriorates rapidly, and if frosted tape is also used with dye markers rather than true ink and brush, you can kiss the art good-bye in less than five years.

    Often, an entire panel will be replaced by cutting out the existing block and pasting the new from the back into the hole. This was usually done when censoring or an editorial change was required that was fairly extensive, making reworking the existing art almost impossible.

    As for white corrections, the most common method was a jar of thick water-based white paint like thick poster paint that was called "Pro-White." It was finely ground to prevent pigment chipping and rough build-ups that were difficult to draw over. Some artists also used a white ink that was more difficult to use because it often separated out of suspension in a few hours and stank like hell. It also had a tendency to leave a gritty surface if you weren't careful.

    Corrections over the paint layer were actually pretty easy if the drawing was done with a brush, but even a pen would work if you did it in one stroke. The real drawback was that sometimes, the black repair "faded" into the white paint because the white would soften and mix upwards, sometimes to the point that the black over it would become too light to repro.

    It's possible to lay down a layer of frosted tape (Scotch Magic Tape) over the white correction or a cut edge and touch up the lines on it, as long as you carefully removed all finger grease from the tape--a trick that saved my life more times than I can count.

    Artists are not gods and often make mistakes. Artists that work for reproduction are demons that operate with every filthy underhanded trick they can come up with to get the job out on schedule--gods have nothing to do with it. The naive perfectionists die acclaimed but poor. The dogs in the pit kill to get the job done and bring home the hamburger and beer in hopes of getting laid. Welcome to the real world, Bubba...


    Add note: Since Davi was kind enough to give us a chance to see this art close up, take a few minutes and study each piece from corner to corner and you'll realize just how little a PEN was used compared to a brush. If you can't tell at first look, keep looking and you'll get it.

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Ilaekae For This Useful Post:


  20. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    2,364
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 1,273 Times in 887 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ooonk! Congowa!

    Tarzan say "knock off!"

    Still fantastic, though!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    645
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 54 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for these davi!

    Heck even back then Franks mad skills were evident. His action and his love for what he was doing are clearly seen here.

    Bruce

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Vasa, Finland
    Posts
    2,590
    Thanks
    3,490
    Thanked 1,209 Times in 438 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Great post Ilaekae! At this time, how was the reproduction done?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,134
    Thanks
    8,227
    Thanked 5,581 Times in 1,786 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It was almost certainly on a rotary press of some type, and since it was color, I'm assuming an offset litho web press due to the relatively high runs and need for cheap production. Letterpress (relief printing) would have been too slow because the ink takes longer to dry and the cost of the plates would have been prohibitive.

    This means that the originals above would have been photographed on a huge vacuum camera with ortho film (high contrast/black-white). The color would have been done with specialists cutting masks to the artist's spec guides to make up simple CMYK screen combinations which would be burned to the appropriate color plate one at a time. I'm not sure what the press capacity was then, but there would have been anywhere from 12 to 24 pages printed at a time (keep in mind that a PAGE is a single side of a sheet of paper trimmed to size--each of the illustrations above are ONE page).

    This isn't much different from how modern newspapers and magazines are printed.

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ilaekae For This Useful Post:


  25. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Mölndal, Sweden
    Posts
    2,778
    Thanks
    2,379
    Thanked 1,911 Times in 832 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Very cool post

    Third panel second page... Thunda looks like Tom Hanks...

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

    Sketchy Link

    Portfolio
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    62
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    makes me sort of happy to see that even frank frazetta could sometimes struggle with anatomy.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  27. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Vasa, Finland
    Posts
    2,590
    Thanks
    3,490
    Thanked 1,209 Times in 438 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks Ilaekae! Seems I have a lot of Wikipedia-reading to do...

    EDIT: so the photographs of these pen and ink drawings would be the black (K), and the hand-cut masks would be CMY? Could these masks be semi-transparent, so they could make different amounts of C, M and Y, or were either on or off, making only 7 individual colours possible? (C, M, Y, CM, CY, MY, CMY)

    Last edited by Serpian; March 9th, 2010 at 03:31 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  28. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,134
    Thanks
    8,227
    Thanked 5,581 Times in 1,786 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    CMYK color is created by using various weights of screens made up of neatly aligned little dots, each in a sep color to make up the final color. For example, 100Y + 50M would indicate/produce a fairly strong orange (100% coverage of yellow plus 50% coverage of magenta printed on top of each other creates the optical illusion of an orange color).

    The pages art above WOULD be the K plates/negs/art since they're the KEY plate (which is where the "K" comes from--surprise!) This plate is almost always printed last, after the Cyan, Magenta and Yellow plates in that order.

    The masks are used to create little CLEAR trap areas where you would want a specific color to appear. A film screen the opposite of what you want is taped behind this "window" (if you want 30% to print, you use a 70% screen in strip-up--remember--we're working with negatives here [inverse]), one for each of the separate CMYK colors that are required to make up the final color (our example above would require a clear hole for yellow [no screen] and a 50% for the magenta negative. These negatives would all be "burned" to the appropriate plate (c, M, Y, K), and...no...there isn't just one neg for each color--I once prepped art that required 274 separate burns to make up the complete four plates (in my case, six plates--the two extra plates were for special colors that had to be an exact match and could not be made up in CMYK)

    The screen values used in the old days were pretty simple--either 10%, 25%, 50% and 75% OR 10%, 20%, 40%, 60%, and 80%, giving you six or seven values for each of the CMYK colors (that's assuming that NO color is 0% and a solid lay is 100%). Pretty primitive, but it was good enough to give us all the art comics and Sunday newspaper comics you grew up with. Today, without computers, there are usually 12 values used, and with computers, you can double that by working in 5% increments. Beyond that, you've entered the world of STUPID...

    This is a highly complex area/discussion from a mechanical standpoint and would require me to write a few 1,000 words just to give the basics, so definitely check out Google for CMYK color and Process or Four-Color printing. In addition to the color breaks, the screens, and the reversals, you also have to worry about what angle the screens are stripped at. Heeheehee...

    I was a specialist in mechanical CMYK color breaks, both as art and pre-press strip-up, so take this as a given...(if my eyes haven't gone completely to hell) I can identify approximately 450-500 CMYK color mixes to within five percent by looking at a piece printed in flat colors...without reference.

    That's the primary reason I work in CMYK in Illustrator and PS--why do RGB when you already have 90%+ of the CMYK color equivalents in your head?

    When things slow down for me a bit, I have a technical tutorial/manual on printing, color and mechanical color screens planned for the POW! section. I may broaden it and see if anyone thinks it might help posted somewhere else, too.

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  29. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Ilaekae For This Useful Post:


  30. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Athens, Greece
    Posts
    551
    Thanks
    72
    Thanked 228 Times in 148 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Ilaekae: Awesome stuff, do post what you can. It's interesting to know this stuff.

    Also I must say that I was impressed by the amount of brush that was used instead of a pen. It was the first thing I noticed about the work, and was quite happy about it, being able to see this brushwork. I mostly work inks with a brush and because the few people who I know work with a pen mostly, it made me feel odd because I don't like working with a pen.

    I am wondering if the pencils for these were tight, loose or non-excistant. Any ideas?

    "Don't judge a book by it's cover" Frank Frazetta 1928-2010
    RIP Frank.

    DA gallery http://michaelsyrigos.deviantart.com/gallery/

    CA Sketchbook http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=131601
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  31. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,878
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 631 Times in 400 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Those branches in the shade, my this man was good at creating light effect.

    ----------------------------------
    Scetchbook: View the exhibitionist's stuff.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  32. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    68
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thank you so much for the pages,

    It does boost my confidence if only a little...

    I was really hard on myself because I definately use white gouache alot...I thought it was merely a mark of my inexperience, but I still kept making lots of mistakes (even when I did improve on some parts)...
    Ilaekae, thx for posting more info behind the comic scenes.

    Keep helping everyone, dude or dudette.

    In this world set by God,
    Imagination is our magic...

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...99#post1542899

    My Sketchbook above. (Way too long ago... been a busy college student)
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  33. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Vasa, Finland
    Posts
    2,590
    Thanks
    3,490
    Thanked 1,209 Times in 438 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks, Ilaekae, you the man!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  34. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,830
    Thanks
    2,629
    Thanked 1,044 Times in 681 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    these pages are in his book.

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  35. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    332
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    F....ING.... EPIC!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  36. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I am wondering if the pencils for these were tight, loose or non-excistant. Any ideas?
    I've seen reproductions of penciled pages by Frazetta for some late Flash Gordon stuff that were pretty detailed, but I think those were meant to be inked by other artists... So I'm not sure how detailed his penciling would have been if he was doing the inking.

    That said, it's always so refreshing to see how sloppy the original pages by masters actually are... helps me curb my perfectionist tendencies. (And MISTAKES! I'm so glad I'm not the only one who makes really loopy mistakes! Even Frazetta makes 'em!)

    White-out and pasted bits of paper and mask cutting and... arrrgh! (We had to cut color-separation masks for one of our classes in school, just so we could learn the obsolete way.) God, I love Photoshop. "We'll fix it in Photoshop!" that's my mantra these days...

    I mostly work inks with a brush and because the few people who I know work with a pen mostly, it made me feel odd because I don't like working with a pen.
    There's actually a fair number of people out there working with brush and ink, so you're not alone... I use a brush almost exclusively, with pen reserved for straight lines and a few small details (most of the comic artists I admire were brush masters. Brush is good.)

    Last edited by QueenGwenevere; March 18th, 2010 at 08:23 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  37. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Quito - Ecuador
    Posts
    3,125
    Thanks
    438
    Thanked 333 Times in 223 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for the scans and the lenghty but interesting technical explanations Ilaekae.

    "Nihil est in intellectu quod non prius in sensu" | SB | Portfolio | FJGC (blog) | DA (Profile) | EJERCICIOS DE COLOR
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook