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Thread: Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

  1. #31
    smellybug Guest
    The idea is to pack the mixed material very tightly around the areas to want to bind and lock together. I like to wet it a tiny bit with isopropyl alcohol. This thins it a little and lets you really mush it in there good. Let this harden completely and check that things are nice and secure. You'll be torqueing on this structure soon, so it should be solid.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    Bit o'trivia: A number of props from the film A Nightmare before Xmas were sculpted and carved from propoxy. Very handy stuff.

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  3. #32
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    Smelly...you are a god amongst men...
    you happened to scuplt one of my favorite creations of all time, and i mst say i appreciate you for that( Draco the Dragon)..

    Thank you for the wealth of knowledge...

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  4. #33
    smellybug Guest
    Sweet, dude, glad you liked the Draco. That was a great project. Too bad those kind of jobs don't come along more often. Hopefully I'll be doing a lot of 3d work for the Massive Black projects, maybe even stuff people can buy at the store. We'll see. Thanks!

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  5. #34
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    Dude, to say i liked it is an understatment..i freakin adore Draco...when i saw your name and the process work you posted a while about Draco, i almost shat in my pants...i can honestly say Dragonheart is one of the movies that solidified my interest in fantasy (hell i even named a character in my comic after the beast)

    I also told my father that i was in contact with the guy who did the sculpture, and he sends his thanks...

    I'm glad you put up this tutorial, if there is a US Concept Art work shop, i hope you can bring these process shot andthe finished piece...i would definately dig seeing it in the flesh...

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  6. #35
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    Smellybug, you sculptured Draco? :eek: OMG! One of my fav films and I sort of "know" one of the creators?! I am honored!

    BTW - thanks a lot for the instructions, I always wondered how to fix the armatures!

    Jester

    Imagination is intelligence having fun!

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  7. #36
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    I may be jumping the gun but ....is the support rod going to be eventually sawn off and left inside the sculpture or is it permanent?

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  8. #37
    smellybug Guest
    Yo Skello: In this case, the support rod will probably be left in. It'll need a support anyway since it will be an airborne character. Plus, if I decide to mold it, that hole will make a good pour sprue. Another trick you can do is grease the support rod before applying the epoxy putty and unscrew it after you bake the sculpey. You then patch the hole and that's it. But this time around I think I'll just leave it in.

    Brian and Jester: you guys are too kind. That was a long time ago, I'm glad somebody even remembers that movie. I do have to give a lot of credit to my boss Phil Tippett; it's not like I was working in a vacuum. He pushed me like never before to get that thing looking right. It was great, but it was hell too. A great learning experience.

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  9. #38
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    aha! ok got it..:chug:

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  10. #39
    smellybug Guest
    Ok, so I have my armature ready to go. I've roughly posed it how I want it (don't be afraid to repose later if need be) and I've wrapped it in 1/16 guage alluminum wire. Why you ask? This is the secret for keeping the clay on the understructure. If I would not put the little wire on there, as I sculpted and manupulated the clay, it would work itself free and fall off the large smooth wires. The small wire gives the clay something to grab on to.
    *NOTE: If this was an even larger figure, I would tightly pack alluminum foil in say the torso area to build up the bulk within a half inch or so of where I eventually want to be. Then I'd do the wrapping with the small wire. It's best to avoid baking very thick pieces of sculpey because it tends to crack. (For me, thick is over 3 inches or so.) But I think I'll be ok on this one. So no foil this time.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    So I hope to start getting some clay on this thing this weekend. Now the real fun starts!

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  11. #40
    smellybug Guest
    I should mention the reference I use and the inspirational things I come across from time to time. One book I'd recommend buying is "Modeling the Figure in Clay" by Bruno Luchesi. You can get it on amazon along with his other book "Modeling the head in clay" which is also great. Check out what that guy can do with water clay. I use the Figure book for anatomy ref all the time, even though it's only sculpted clay...great stuff.

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  12. #41
    smellybug Guest
    Alright lets start the good part...sculpting!

    First thing I want to do in this case is make a template to aid me in getting the ball rolling. I draw over the xerox and press down hard with pen, transferring the outline of the main bodymass to the cardboard. You can also spraymount the xerox to the cardboard or foamcore then cut it out. It's up to you.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    Cut the shape out with an exacto knife...watch them fingers.
    If you're not pasting down the original image and cutting it out, it's a good idea to mark major landmarks like the eye or the arms, ribs.. whatever you will be needing later.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    Now as you can see, there's no question if you're getting it right. Start adding clay. Be sure to really work it into the wires in the beginning so that you have a solid base.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    Be sure to really work it into the wires in the beginning so that you have a solid base.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

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  13. #42
    smellybug Guest

    The blocking stage.

    The beginning stage is called the blocking stage. Just like blocking any performance, we are not concerned about the fine detail yet, we are just getting the basic dimemsions down. I normally start with the larger masses first. In this case the torso area. Everything hinges on getting this first part right, so I take my time and sorta creep up to the shape I think is correct, taking into account anatomy and the pose, always measuring with my calipers and comparing to the reference.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    It helps to throw some temporary features on there to kinda help your eye "see" where you're going.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    As you can see, the surface is a little different now. Sometimes all the little hunks of clay that I quicky lay down can look a little distracting. I want to be sure that I'm generally happy with the way the torso is looking, so I tool down the surface a little with some very crude and rough tools. I call this "equalizing the surface." I give it a quick once over in order improve the look of it a bit.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    These are some tools I use very often, especially in these early stages. Notice that they all have grooves or cerations. The wooden one came that way. The one on the right is a rake tool I made from a small jewelers saw blade. The one on the left is store bought, I ground the notches in there with a dremel tool.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    They all have a different effect. Generally I work from course to fine. Kinda makes sense, don't it? You just gotta experiment.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

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  14. #43
    smellybug Guest

    Starting the limbs

    Lets start adding the limbs.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    Again, my approach to something like this is to try to build it like a reverse dissection. The wire is the bone and the clay is built up like sinue and muscle. Even though this is a fictional character, I want it to feel real and absolutely possible. I find that when I add clay like I'm placing muscle and fat, trying to show where one muscle passes under another, or where a muscle and bone connect, the trick seems to have a positive effect. Even if it's not technically accurate, even if a lot of it will eventually be coverd with skin and texture, having that wierd surgical frame of mind pays off. Form and function is key. (And it's gotta look like the reference)
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    Once I've roughed one side I can move to the other. Use the calipers to keep opposing limbs and features relatively on track.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!
    Think about how muscle mass and flesh change shape, shift and stretch and tighten as you lay down the clay. Surround yourself with reference that can help you. Keep good reference in view. It's a little embarrassing, but you sometimes have to go and buy a bodybuilder magazine to see extreme examples of muscles and bodies in different poses and conditions. Try books on dance or sports. There are a few decent artist reference books out there, but depending on your project, a good book on boxing might be the right choice. Regardless, having proper ref in front of you is incredibly necessary. ON this project, I use a combination of human and animal reference.

    As for the pose here. I am torn between doing something very challenging and dynamic on the one hand, and on the other hand being very faithful to the original image. I'm mostly leaning towards the latter here. For what this will be used for, keeping descriptive, yet fun to look at is what I'm after.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

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  15. #44
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    Posts like this are the reason why I just love CA.
    Thank you ever so much, you just gave the answers to a hundred questions I had on sculpting and I realize how much I did wrong or in a more complicated way than necessary.

    Jester

    Imagination is intelligence having fun!

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  16. #45
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    I dont sculpt, and the last time I tried it was like 8 years ago. You make it seem so easy and fun. I'll have to try this someday soon.

    Very inspiring!:thumbsup:

    -iwasink

    -http://iwasink.com/-
    DS Illustration
    "Get reference.
    There is nothing wrong with using a photo to help you see things.
    No one complains about life drawing,
    so take a photo.
    its easy, and will improve your piece greatly."
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  17. #46
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    I've never tried that "cardboard thing" before. What a good idea! I have a bunch of creatures I've drawn over the years that I was thinking of finally bringing to life in clay for my portfoilio. This thread is great...thanks! :chug:

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  18. #47
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    crap, I went away for like 2 days and now there is a shitload more!

    Im so excited I feel like a little kid on christmas!

    peace
    -mike

    -Deth Jester
    "Live each day like you will die tommorow, and dream like you will live forever..."
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  19. #48
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    damn... awsome tutorial! Im starting on doing my own creature, using this thread for learning... show more
    respect!

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  20. #49
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    awesome petey. very interesting to see your process. i cant tell you how many times i've looked at the one i have and wondered, how the hell did he do that? i'm savoring every minute of this dude. makes me wanna sculpt...-c36

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  21. #50
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    bought me some sculpey now -- i'd like to try that stuff out now you show us the process. Great thread!

    Power is nothing without intelligence.

    Sketchbook!
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  22. #51
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    lets play find the tools in smellybugs workshop.. lol naw im just kidding.. smellybug man.. damn.. thats like all i can say... im 14 and i have some experience around drawing and its a gift unlike some people who have to learn.. but to learn soo much early in life is just amazing when u get to college and amaze ur art teachers and know ur gonna make it through... man uve touched all of us with this.. thank you

    -juicy

    grrr roawl!
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  23. #52
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    What more can I say than anybody else...just thank you!
    pure inspiration! :chug:

    "Draco" was really awsome, he saved the movie
    I just read, that you worked on Jurassic Park, i think you did animatics, right?
    And what was your job on starship troopers?

    thanks for spending your time with this tutorial,
    You make me want to sculp!
    :thumbsup:

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  24. #53
    smellybug Guest
    Thanks Sam, yeah, on Jurassic I worked on the stopmo animatics. Just moldmaking and fabricating, helping to turn the stan winston sculpts into stopmo puppetts. I was there the day spielberg called my boss phil to basically anounce the end of stopmotion. Originally, the dinos where going to be computer 'enhanced' go motion. Anyway...long story that's probably told better on the dvd. On Troopers I sculpted a number of the bug maquettes, most of the warrior and all of the brainbug. These were based off of Craig Hayes designs. I then moved on to being an animator once the art duties where done. BTW, everybody go out and buy Starship Troopers II or watch the pay perview next month. I was animation sup' on that. That way Phil can get more and bigger projects funded. (sorry for the advertisement.)
    www.starshiptroopers2.net

    Coro; thanks brudda
    Juicy: wha?
    ninja: doit
    dethJ: I'll be putting more up in the next few days
    jester: that picture of you always cracks me up. thanks for the enthusiasm. now get to work.

    Thanks to all for keeping up with this forum. It's great ego boost.

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  25. #54
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    Thanks!

    Thanks for the great tutorial, Smellybug--hope to see some more from you.

    The animatics can be seen on the making-of sections of the Jurassic Park DVDs. They're pretty cool in their own right.

    I'm definitely looking forward to Starship Troopers 2...

    "Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it."
    -- Goethe

    Visit my online portfolio: Dan Perez Studios
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  26. #55
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    This is really awesome stuff! Can't wait for more updates.

    I have a quick question for Dan or Smellybug. (BTW Dan, your tutorials on your site rock...they definately pointed an absolute beginner in the right direction).

    If you bake a part of your model to make sure you don't lose detail before adding other stuff to it, what's the best way to get new clay to stick to your baked model? I know I've seen something about this before, but I just can't find it. :/

    "Every generation sees the past though the lens of its own time." - Thom Hartmann
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  27. #56
    smellybug Guest
    I usually prep the already baked parts with a rub down of turpenoid. If the area is smooth, I'll also score it a bit with an xacto knife to give the new stuff a little something to hold on to. Just a little cross hatching is enough.

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  28. #57
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    Thanks Smellybug, I'll have to try that! Although I fear my model might be a little too small...I might have to add the details with milliput. :o

    "Every generation sees the past though the lens of its own time." - Thom Hartmann
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  29. #58
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    smelly.... im jonesin' for an update.....

    tyty

    MY SITE
    available for freelance
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  30. #59
    smellybug Guest
    Ok, finally an update! "Woot!" as Manley would say.
    Lets start with the webbing between the arms. Here I've cut out some fine wire mesh. You can use anything, alluminum or stainless steel is good. Cut it with tin snips and just push it into the sculpey...about half an inch here. At least deep enough to stay put.
    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    Then I press the clay in there..keeping it thin for now.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    here I'm laying in "stretchies" or tension folds. You guessed it...use real fabric for ref. Or your grandmas butterwings.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    stretchies roughed in just using fingers.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    going over the surface with my knotched loop tool. Notice I'm still using large tools. It ain't time for the little ones yet. Just trying to find the natural looking folds that give the area a sense of pulling and tension.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    The other side is much more relaxed. It's tricky to decide how to show this. You just have to experiment. Look at different materials and see what seems right, think about what the creatures skin and flesh are made of. Is the skin tough or silky and thin? Here I feel that there should be a number of permanent folds that just buckle, since this character spends a lot of time in the stretched position, running and leaping about. I think the skin should be thick and tough. (btw, this isn't done!)

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

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  31. #60
    smellybug Guest
    So for the dorsal spikes, i need a thicker, more rigid mesh to support the clay. Again, I'm using the drawing to figure out how this is cut.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    here's side view after planting the rest of the spike meshes and throwing clay over them. Starting to look like the original picture, huh?

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    Hand armature almost done. Still need to wrap in thin wire for grip.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    blocking it in without tools, just rolling balls of clay and pressing it in there. Trying to keep in mind the anatomy at all times, functionality sells the shapes y'know. Gee whiz, now that I look at it, the arms looking a little feeble and thin! I'll fix that tomorrow.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    The nose needs good support. Measure with calipers. Notice that here and on the fingers I added propoxy tips. This is an optional way to make sharp tips of.. things. When the model is baked, you can sand the tip very sharp and they'll be durable this way. Worth a try.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    Roughing in some wrinkles with the large-ish loop tool.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    Use reference. This is just the rough the begining, but I won't finish without looking at the real thing.

    Smellybugs Maquette Tutorial completed!

    Enjoy...more soon!


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