Art: The Mighty Pachyderm (sculpt 1)
 
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  1. #1
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    The Mighty Pachyderm (sculpt 1)

    Hello all,

    I've been lurking around here and the Shiflett brothers forum for a few months and wanted to introduce myself and share my first sculpture. I've been designing for print and web the last 12 years and thought I'd try working with my hands and stop staring at a monitor all day. Sculpting has now consumed my thoughts and spare time and I hope to share more in the future, I've really loved it so far. Comments and criticism are appreciated.

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    Last edited by squidPUNCHER; March 4th, 2010 at 03:00 PM.
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  3. #2
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    Hi there!

    You're heading in the right direction. Textures look very good. The legs are a bit short and thick, feet look a bit on the big size. Neck should be a bit longer too, I think. Have a look at this and you'll see what I mean. Starting from a good photo of an elephant skeleton can help with proportions. Keep up the good work!

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  4. #3
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    Thumbs up

    I would have to totally agree with you! I have just started messing with clay and I can't seem to stop. My only problem is I seem to rush everything because I have so many ideas I want to make instead of focusing on ine thing at a time!

    So this is your first sculpture then? I am very impressed! You have quite the future in sculpting ahead of you!

    When you are able to separate yourself from the idea of "perfection" you are truly free to be yourself.
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  5. #4
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    Hi, welcome to our world. Looking good. I like the skin tex.

    Mah ' Crub

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  6. #5
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    “I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process.” - Vincent van Gogh

    Looking very good btw

    So, where will your imagination take you today?...
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  7. #6
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    Ooooooh, very nice. Skin creases are nicely rendered, I'd try to work out the shape of the legs before going any further with the texture. Impressive so far.

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  8. #7
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    So great!!!
    Which material do you make it?
    Like a real elephant
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    Last edited by tedjohn09; March 15th, 2010 at 11:05 PM.
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  9. #8
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    The only critique I have —that the proportions of the legs and neck are funny —has already been said.

    A recommendation, though: I discovered that working with Super alone makes the surface really hard to control. I mix in 1/2 Firm for most parts now and use straight firm for things that require a lot of detail like hands and faces.

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  10. #9
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    The head is just perfect, but as other have mentioned, the leg proportions are definitely funky. Elongate and thin out those legs!
    Changing the neck will probably be impossible at this point, but if you havent baked yet, then you can still make the legs better and improve the piece

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshua A.C. Newman View Post
    The only critique I have —that the proportions of the legs and neck are funny —has already been said.

    A recommendation, though: I discovered that working with Super alone makes the surface really hard to control. I mix in 1/2 Firm for most parts now and use straight firm for things that require a lot of detail like hands and faces.
    Hmmm.. I have only used super so far, and sculptures definitely become a nightmare when you bump into other section of the sculpture. Super sculpey is extremely soft, and any slight touch will deform the surface or any texture you had going on. It's frustrating.
    Maybe it is time to buy some firm.
    When you say you "mix" firm with super, how do you go about doing that?

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  12. #11
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    Oh, it's easy. I roll them together into a log, twist the log, fold it in half, and repeat. You can also roll and fold, I suppose. Firm sticks to regular Super just fine.

    I use 5/50 for most modeling, 3/4 for spots that need some definition like faces and fingers. I've worked some with straight Firm, but I use it mostly subtractively. It doesn't model well and is prone to crumbling.

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