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  1. #1
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    6 Figure jobs...artists part of the feature..

    To be more specific, video game artist...amongst "unusual" 6 figure jobs....

    AOL-CNN Article

    It's kinda cool that this job is getting some spot light...


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  3. #2
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    You notice how many years you have to be in the industry?...especially with 70-hr work weeks! No thanks!
    "If one advances confidently in the direction of
    his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he
    has imagined, he will meet with a success
    unexpected in common hours."
    - H.D. Thoreau

  4. #3
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    Oh definately...

    It's one of those you really-have-to-love-what-you-do jobs...

  5. #4
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    I'm curious how many people on this board have careers as video game concept artists. I'm pretty sure that's what I want to be, but sometimes I wonder, "Am I insane?" especially when I see the talent here... mindnumbing!

    -Sapph

  6. #5
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    Is it a bad thing to be insane? ;-)
    Power is nothing without intelligence.

    Sketchbook!

  7. #6
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    video game concept artist?

    Unless you're on staff at a game developer, it can be tough to do just concept art for games full time. I tend to supplement my concpet gigs with straight illustration and some comics work. Still, it's a great way to make a living. I think it also probably helps to have some 3D skills, be able to do concept all the way to a skinned and textured 3D model, which I can't do. Yet. - mh

    http://www.matthaley.com

  8. #7
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    Well yeah, I was thinking if I were on staff at a game developer... I don't know if I'd wanna be totally freelance, but who knows what will happen...

    -Sapph

  9. #8
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    don't do it!! save yourselves! you get too old too quick, i've only been in 3 years and i'm dyin! it erases the outside world and if you're caucasian it makes you transparent! sometimes..depending on the studio!! no really, the industry in general is one hard mother to get into, concept art, laughingly difficult. like maniacal insane laughing. i do texture work, sometimes i do concepts but not as my main focus...well right now i do freelance cause i'm in the process of getting a new game job..but you get the point. it pays tremendously well when things pay off, but you have to be very willing to move ALOT when you first start out and be ready to have a fluctuating salary, but with not too many years you can hop up to near to 6 figgers before you get too old (30's) as long as you LOVE WHAT YOU DO! it's a lifestyle, not a career choice..in my humble opinion anyhow
    It's super happy wonderful fun time!
    www.fiddlegarden.com

  10. #9
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    *looks frightened* It's THAT difficult to be a conceptual artist?

    What about for movies, is it even worse? I mean, I still want to aim for it, but I feel like such a naive little kid... I'm going to go to the GDC this year, and hope that it gives me a better feel for what would really be required to getting in the biz. Hopefully I can talk to lots of people and get a general idea, but your warnings are certainly scary. Art is my passion, and I want to do art as a living... especially conceptual art; is it as horrifyingly draining and terrible as everybody seems to be saying? Is there anybody out there who has made it as a gaming production designer who finds it very rewarding and fulfilling?

    - A worried Sapph

  11. #10
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    oh it's tremendously rewarding! half of the rewarding experience is just getting a frickin job. I myself was not worthy of entry into the industry but like so many before me my persaverance, deeply rooted networking, and D.A.L.(dumb ass luck) prevailed as a local startup needed low paid entry level work. I ultimately want to just focus on conceptual design for film and video games too, but you have to be at such a high level of skill and production speed to really do this. so it's all about really being a master of everything i think, scenery, characters, painting, color theory, rubber chickenry. that's what will get you there, and of course D.A.L. but the odds of getting those jobs out of the starting gate are pretty damn tough. i'm no wizened game guru, but i've talked to and worked with a few and they put in their time, and got what they deserved. after a while though i think you crave stability more than fame in the game industry at least don't get discouraged though! just network network network, improve all the time and be willing to have to work your way up to the glorious position. hope this kinda helps.
    It's super happy wonderful fun time!
    www.fiddlegarden.com

  12. #11
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    It does, thanks so much for your advice...

  13. #12
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    Wally seems like he's been in it for a bit...

    I worked in video games for 5-6 years It was difficult just doing concepts because other people were possesive of thier territory. I pissed off a lead artist guy one time because I wasnt on his team and when the Art director asked everyone in the studio to bring forth thier Ideas I submitted mine and everyone of my character designs ended up making the cut, next thing I know i'm getting threats etc from the art lead sheesh...

    Anyway sometimes it gets like that, I will say that if I wasnt getting paid to draw I would still be doing it anyway and thats what you need to ask yourself. There are guys I know that spent ONE YEAR in the game business thinking they deserved the BIG salary when they didnt know $#!T...see... know matter who you are have to work your ass off to get what you want, it may take a few years. I'm sorry but if anyone here bitches because $35.000 to $45.000 a year isnt good enough then you are in trouble because that is better than most people with a shitty desk job that they hate earn. And it will be forever that you will earn more than that doing freelance.

    Working at a game studio and Earning a salary has way more upsides... you can pay the rent, the bills and all you kids who dont think they need Insurance are mistaken, I got sick with phnuemonia right after I was outta work thinking I could freelance and almost DIED. I was 28 and in good health. CRUNCH TIME is not the entire length of the project, most of the year I got to leave at 6:00 PM. and when you do have to work late hours the studio brought in food to try and relieve the stress. I learned sooooo much working for a video game studio, I am so confident now I can pick up any software package and learn to use it in no time which allows me to draw more. If you like video games and that is your passion go work in them, if you want to work in film and animation go pursue it!

    I did and I am loving what i do working in animation, I earn a great salary have travelled over seas to asia on the company tab, now all i do is concepts. I have no desire to ever do 3D again, BUT IT TOOK ME 8 years to get here, nothing comes easy.

    Sorry to go on and on but the point is humble yourselves it is not easy and you guys have to focus on what you want, If you let it be negative then it is, I reccomend working in games it's a great starting off point and there is nothing that says you cannot go off into the ideal work situation. Just dont let a big ego bump you on the bum on the way in...
    Last edited by ChadTHX1138; February 14th, 2004 at 08:57 PM.
    Chad Townsend
    http://www.chadtownsend.com

    We now return you to Bullit already in progress...

  14. #13
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    amen
    It's super happy wonderful fun time!
    www.fiddlegarden.com

  15. #14
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    This is a great thread btw, I am also considering animation, and working for games or films (if I ever reach that skill level).

    Originally posted by ChadTHX1138

    I will say that if I wasnt getting paid to draw I would still be doing it anyway and thats what you need to ask yourself.
    I keep thinking that myself... I realize that sometimes jobs are taken strictly for the money. A lot of the people around me are more concerned with money, and getting an education so money won't be a problem, etc. I feel that I can be happy doing what I like to do... even if I'm not paid 6 figures. (Now I just need to find a girlfriend who has the same mentality)

    It's not often I see info coming from people who have been in the industry, thank you for sharing your knowledge and experiences

  16. #15
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    oh yeah, one big thing for me at least has been the fact that what i did once to make myself happy and kill my free time is now what i do all the time. it may not sound like alot but once you get paid for your "hobby" and people expect it of you every day, it kinda makes things interesting i guess, for a little while. but it's ok now, i try to work on two different styles in and out of work myself, most of my "unprofessional" work is usually the stuff that makes me laugh and is highly inappropriate for the mainstream
    It's super happy wonderful fun time!
    www.fiddlegarden.com

  17. #16
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    I agree with sic1... my real goal for a career was not to earn a lot of money (if I wanted to do that I'd learn to become a dentist or something), but to love what I did. I don't expect to get it without a lot of long hours and hard work, but it sounds like a goal really worth striving for.

    On one hand, I worry that drawing every single day for hours at a time with strict deadlines and hundreds of revisions would take the joy out of it.. but on the other, I could never live with myself if I get some random desk job and know that I could have tried for something like this.

    -Sapph

  18. #17
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    Well I was a working professional in a non art related field and my experience has taught me that the work environment is the same regardless of the field. You will always have office politics, managers breathing down your neck to meet deadlines, questionable management decisions driven by $$$, late hours during crunchtime, and irate customers and vendors that you need to communciate with. In time I realized that time is more valuable than money because you can always make money doing something, but once you've used up your time on this earth, that's it. Game over. Might as well do something you enjoy since most other factors are the same.

    One of my college professors said once: "If you aren't thinking about your work when you're taking a shower then you aren't cut out for that line of work." A little extreme but there is a grain of truth to that and that's what made me realize that if I'm not totally into my job/career, best find something I'm willing to bust my ass for to achieve the level of success that I want.

  19. #18
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    RIGHT ON!

    I'm a concept artist who found 3D to be incredibly boring and tedious. I have high respects for programmers, modelers, animators, but just because I admire their work, does not mean that it is meant for me. I am icrredibly strong and fast with my concepts, and had to put in a few years with low pay to sharpen up my skills. Now I have more opportunities, but these opportunities would have never presented themselves if I hadn't worked hard, and discovered what truely inspires me.

    Remmember, that there are a lot of directions you can go in as an artist. Just try out as many things as possible, and eventually you'll realize "what you HAVE to be doing"...not what you "think" you would WANT to be doing.
    "If one advances confidently in the direction of
    his dreams, and endeavors to live the life he
    has imagined, he will meet with a success
    unexpected in common hours."
    - H.D. Thoreau

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