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    Beginners Issues

    Hi there. First off I just wanted to say what an amazing forum this is. I'm definatly in awe at the amount of talented people here. It's kind of a mind trip when just picking a forum to look into.

    Anyhow, I'm a beginner in drawing on the computer, and I know I don't belong here. But I don't know anyone who draws so I don't particularly have anyone to converse with. My problem is I find when im drawing, lets say mountains, I start off with a general idea, but then I start to scribble in the more fine detail hoping that the random brush strokes im doing will work. I would say to myself that I need to visualize what Im drawing a bit more, and attempt to replicate that by taking my time... I donno. I was just wondering if anyone has any advice they would like to share. Thanks for reading

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    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    Every mark on your paper or canvas or screen should have a purpose and that purpose shows the intent of the artist and their control of the medium. A lack of that control says even the good stuff is an accident and I don't know what I am doing. Painting or drawing in a loose style doesn't mean the marks are made in a haphazard way. every mark has a beginning, a path and an end. You should know what those are before you make it. What you are doing is learning to abtract the mountain into a series of large and small shapes that look believable to a viewer. To do that you must be able to understand what you see as value and color and pattern and then reproduce those things as an image.

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    Zazerzs is offline ....bing me the bore worms Level 7 Gladiator: Samnite
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    Stick with your larger brushes longer, hold of on adding small details till the end.

    Rely more on conscious decision rather than luck, use a ton of reference.

    "Talent is a word found in the mouth of the lazy to dismiss the hard work of those who have achieved."
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    So in essence you are saying without strong control of imagintion, the projected image is merely accidental? Alright fair enough. Actually I kind of like that way of thinking. Puts alot more expression into the artwork I've seen.
    Then, for me, I have a problem with my imagintion maybe? Or ability to hold a specific frame of thought. I have an idea of what I want, and I know when it doesn't look right, but holding it is difficult for me. Actually it's kind of frustrating because I can't draw how I want to.. (.. starting to sound like the 8 year old who cries they cant draw). Would you suggest starting alot smaller?

    *edit* I suppse that means working from the ground up for me . Depth, outline, lighting(though I suppose thats depth) structure.. Im going to have to reevaluate what im drawing now if I want to build from it. I think what Im attempting is way too far ahead of me. Does anyone have any suggestions for where to being?

    Last edited by Blakel4; February 18th, 2010 at 06:03 PM.
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    I am not talking about imagination I am talking about making marks for your image. It doesn't matter if you are looking at something or not, you must still make a series of marks to create it. You have to decide on them as you go, before you make each one or at the very least decide in sets of marks. that is skill and to get it you must practice.

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    Fair enough Ill try and find something I can practise with and build upon at the same time. I appricate the comments.

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    Many people would advise drawing from life, and I would have to agree. Set up still lifes (lives?), and do one every day for months.
    Build up a big library of artist work you like, study them. Don't just copy them. Tear it apart, see what makes it work. Great artists make sure that every stroke of their instrument describes something, be it space, movement, light, colour or dimension (David Leffel says so, and he knows what he is talking about). Try to see which stoke does each. I find oil paintings especially useful for seeing how the artist achieves great results.
    What I am saying is, don't just copy what you see.

    Also, play around with different media. Try to do pen, pencil, oil paint, acrylic, charcoal, conte crayon, pastel, ink or digital. Experiment, and have fun. But always think (I need to work on this)


    Of course, accompany all of these still lives with sketches of people from life, things from imagination and just generally whatever you like. But once again, make sure every line describes something. Don't just put them down because you see it.

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    Ive always felt iffy about drawing from other peoples work, though I suppose in order for people to grow we have to share and see how others have achieved it. Ill try some of the suggestions you posted. I think Im going to try and start with the human figure first off in a repetitive pattern everyday.

    To be honest, ive held onto the stupid notion that learning to draw through a regiemental pattern would abstruct the creative flow. Im beginning to realize that without the skills achieved through that repetitive process, expressing what you want is impossible.

    *edit* thankyou again, you've given me alot of things to think about

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    If someone cannot paint an apple or pear, I very much doubt they could paint a figure.
    But please, go ahead. I am just saying the way I(and many others) think people should do it.

    Also, you don't need to draw from other peoples work, just analyse it. And you don't need to, but it is helpful as you can see what makes them skilled, and why they are superior.

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    So you suggest I begin with fruit in general? Or simple objects like balls and cups, and boxes as such?

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    I would advise starting with more simple objects (1 object at a time) and work your way up by adding more objects, then swap them for more complex objects. Try to get objects with different texture, colour, forms and shape. This means you will have to solve more problems (giving you more answers)
    I would also advise starting in greyscale until you can get composition, values, perspective and proportion to a level that you are comfortable.

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    Also; plan your work. If you're relatively new to drawing you can't expect to draw mountains straight from your head with all the shadows/ texture etc in the right areas. Work from big to small by roughing out larger shapes and refining them with smaller ones.

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    Use always a brush double the size you think you need to, at least until you gain some self-control over adding detail. Detail will never save a picture without a structure previously working.

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    Thanks again for the advice. I've ditched the idea of drawing on the computer for the moment. Thinking pencil and paper will be a better approach, and I took the advice for simple objects. It's definatly a bit of a open field for where and what do I do, but I guess that's half the fun of exploring it. I just hope I don't waste time in one direction. Thanks again for your nice posts

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