Ilya Repin St.Petersburg State Academy of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture - Page 2
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Thread: Ilya Repin St.Petersburg State Academy of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture

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    a few more pictures from repin academy

    First year students drawing portrait, monumental studio with figure drawings, end of semester grading show.

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    The studio of Ilya Repin

    A famous painting of Ilya Repin's studio, this is a collective piece of work, where many students who are also in the painting all worked on the piece.

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    sketchbook drawings

    by Repin Academy students

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  7. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by vaporz View Post
    ...what about the china, koreans, japanese, and the french ecole? I think they are pretty good too... tell me what you think about them =D
    vaporz,

    Chinese - some, mostly individual artists who've been taught at the Russian Academy or took master classes from our professors or from those Chinese artists who'd studied at the Academy. I don't know any Chinese academy where the system of academic art education to be as strong as in St.Petersburg Academy. Not even close.

    Korean - the same. Now there are mostly Chinese students at the Academy, about 10-15 years ago there were mostly Koreans. So again, there are some private schools (like in the US) that teach academic drawing/painting, but there is no system.

    Japanese, French - NO.
    If you need links to prove it - just ask.

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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    I better not show you how NOT to draw, but rather show a good example.

    Here is a link to an amateur video, taken during masterclass given by Nikolay Blokhin, in Kazan (capital of Tatarstan Republic of Russia):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLsxRlaiGF4

    Warning - it's really long. But those who's really interested, will truly enjoy the process.

    Just a reminder - N.Blokhin is a well-known artist (you can see his works in the backrgound in video), and he teaches at the Russian Academy of Arts.

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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    Thanks for this thread it is very helpful.

    Few questions:

    How much would you estimate per year cost of a student at the academy. Considering tuition, art supplies, and the cheapest rent and food costs? (Ballpark)

    How many students actually go through the whole 6 year program?

    Are students allowed to take semester(s) off or a year off and come back and continue their education?

    Would it be practical for an american student to work in Russia to pay for school?

    Thanks

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    answers

    If you get to be a degree student after taking a prep course (a whole year), some people have to take it twice, here is a budjet

    1. Tuition is about $5,000 a year, more or less, they raise prices from time to time, so don't know what the exact amount is now. The first two years are also cheaper than the last 4 years.
    2. Living expenses. Renting near the shool or in the center is about $1000 - $1200 for a 2-3 room apartment. Most people share, so you'd pay about $300 - 500 a month depending how many roommates you have. You can probably get something cheaper, all depends on the conditions and proximity to the school. Food costs a little less than in the US, I'd say 15-20% less.
    3. Art supplies are much much cheaper there than in the US or Europe, but you do use lots of paints and canvas. Hard to say here. But I would allow another $800 per year.
    4. Yes, you can work teaching English. I know someone who is doing just that. Unfortunately, the school load is huge, and you'd be lucky if you can work one day a week over the weekend. But, native English speakers are in demand.
    5. Yes, you can take a semester off, it's been done. Don't know exactly what paperwork you have to show, usually it is for health reasons, but if you can provide something, I think it's possible.
    6. How many people go through the whole 6 years? Most people do. When it takes one so much effort to get in, you probably want to stick there for a while. But some people do quit in the middle. The first and second year are probably the most important, and the hardest. For most Americans and Europeans the workload is too much, we don't have anything even remotely that intensive in the States. It's like a bootcamp. 8 hours of actual class, and then homework (most people do it at night).

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    Lena, if you don't mind, I just would like to add a couple of comments.

    - $1,000-$1,200 - is not for an average apartment. The Academy is located in a very expensive district - Vasilievsky Island, about 1 mile from Nevsky Prospect, the very center of St.Pete.
    So if you want to live nearby, in a very nice apartment - that's the price you'd probably pay. If your demands are more modest... you get an idea.

    - Lena, what about that cafe in the Academy building? So far I didn't meet anyone who'd been poisoned there. And - it's for students and professors only (everyone needs to get a pass in order to get through the Academy security). The prices are the most reasonable.

    What you really need to be ready for is the building itself. To say it needs renovation is to say nothing, as some places are in a very bad shape. The Academy museum and library now are closed (would probably take another couple of years for renovation)...

    My favorite exhibit: pieces of paper on the walls in some corridors, "Watch for plaster falling from the ceiling!" (corridors are about 15ft high, so I always check the ceiling to make sure I'll see it's coming down and will have enough time to run.. kinda good for training your eye and attention).

    Did I scare you enough, The~Tramp?

    P.S. Adding more info (translation button is at the bottom of each page):

    - There is also a dormitory, which was renovated recently (this link is for mostly text on entrance exams, and a couple of images of dormitory). Conditions are quite reasonable.
    - This link shows the page with many images on entrance exams requirements.
    - Here is the link to dozens of images of the Academy building.

    Last edited by Book Guru; November 12th, 2010 at 02:42 PM.
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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    Just wish there was some type of financial aid. The cost is not expensive when compared to some of the art school in the states but without a financial aid program it makes it hard. I will have to look into other financial resources i.e bank loans and grants in order to generate the funds. I may have to settle for the prep course. Just not too excited about taking 3 hours of Russian a day if I cant afford to go to the academy.

    Few more questions:

    Whats the average age of first year students? Is there any older students?

    If your portfolio is really good is the prep course necessary?

    Lena murray, any plans to organize another workshop at Repin?

    Im concerned about the language barrier. I know the instructors draw on your paper and the drawings explain a lot but what about verbal explanation of assignments, homework, materials, techniques etc. For example I have been reading the english pdf of Fundamentals of drawing by Mogilevtsev (available at www.4-art.org, highly recommended!) and the text although brief is absolutely necessary in my opinion in understanding the drawings. Cant imagine going to a school and not being able to communicate with the teachers and students.

    Would love to go to this school. I find the descriptions of the workload and overall expectation of students more exciting than discouraging. Hell, just reading about this school has motivated me to work harder. It would be amazing to be surrounded by other hard working artist that are training themselves for a career not a hobby. Thanks for answering my questions.

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    The~Tramp,

    I'll just comment on a couple of things, which I'm familiar with. And please, Lena, correct me if I miss some details.

    1. Students' age. In 1990-s and earlier the average age was about 30 years old. Nowadays the students are younger, but you could see next to you both 18 and 28 yo people. In Russia, they call 40yo artist an "young artist", or even "beginner".

    2. Your portfolio. I think I better call to the Department of International Education to verify on that. I'm more familiar with requirements for Russian students (check the links I provided in my previous message).
    As far as I know, there is a separate entrance exam requirement for foreign students. And there is also a competition. So you'll have to compete with many Chinese, who either had prep courses at the Academy or were taking private master classes from its professors. After you're accepted, you'll be studying all together, with Russian students, in the same class. And be ready that during the first two years there will be foundations. Only in your 3rd year you're allowed to choose the workshop where you wish to continue your studies.

    3. Language barrier. This is the most difficult part. You don't want to waste your time and money on something you don't completely comprehend. Imagine, even Russian students often don't completely understand what their professor wants, they confuse things, such as understanding of tonal relashionship, composition, etc, etc...
    Check the Fundamentals of Drawing book, compare the English with Russian text (if you have at least some basic level of Russian). That's what you'll have to understand completely. And this is only a small part of a much bigger picture.

    To my personal opinion, based on information about Lena's school, I'd recommend spending at least a year at their academy first. I'm not sure they teach in Russian, but you can take Russian lessons simulteniously with your art lessons, and then start using more Russian language during your studying there.
    Taking private lessons from a former Art Academy professor or even a student - could be another idea. But frankly, I don't know any Repin's professor who speaks English. And if you take lessons from a student who himself didn't understand the system properly, you're in trouble.

    The point is, don't rush to Russia yet. You just have to take it slowly. I've seen works made by foreign students who spent some time here, even spoke "not-so-bad" Russian, but their drawings speak for themselves. They don't show the necessery level because of their lack of comrehension.

    I hope Lena will give you a more profound answer.
    Sorry, if I upset you in some way. But you have to be realistic and, again, please don't rush.
    You have a great motivation ("for a career not a hobby"), just please use it properly.

    Last edited by Book Guru; November 13th, 2010 at 03:19 AM.
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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    answers to some questions

    I apologize for not following this thread.

    Book Guru, thanks for answering some of the questions directed to me.

    1. I noticed Francis wanted to know about Repin's drawings at the Academy museum. I remember seeing a drawing by him when he himself was a student, I might be wrong. But, there are great drawings by many students of Chistyakov, who was the teacher of Repin, Serov, Vrubel, Korovin and some other great 19 century artists.

    2. Yes, the cafeteria at the Academy is not bad at all, and it is much cheaper than average prices, may be it's subsidised.

    3. I might be mistaken, but I believe all foreign students do have to take the prep course. It's not even about how well you draw and paint, but more about the style, the type of hatching you use and etc. In a way, they want to have a sort of homogenous style of work, because for one thing, it will be easier for them to teach you in class, and also it probably makes it easier for them to judge your work during exams.

    4. Language is a problem. The Danish girls who have started the prep course this year are having a hard time, but they work very hard. If you can get some tapes before, it would be very helpful. But, eventually, most westerners do learn the language and communicate well.

    5. About the building, it is old, but it has tonns of charm and history. Some of the studios have amazing North light from the skylights, which enables you to get some beautiful cools.

    The bathrooms are terrible, but they are better now than 10 years ago, you don't want to know what they were like then.

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  23. #42
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    Here is the most recent information on the entrance to the Academy.
    (actually, as recent as today, November 29, 2010)

    1. You have to take prep courses, for at least one year.
    They last for 9 months (no break), from October 1 to July 1.

    During prep courses, no campus is provided, you have to rent an apartment.

    2. The cost for prep courses is 5,000 euro per year (they accept payments divided by semester, 2,500 per each)

    3. The cost for the full year studying at the Academy, if accepted after exams - 7,000 euro. The payment also could be separated in two semesters.

    Prep courses last 9 hours a day, 5 days a week:
    - 5 hours is art studying (you choose Graphics, Painting, or Sculpture)
    - 4 hours is Russian language

    After the prep courses you will have to take an exam, competing with other foreign students (majority is from China). However, they pointed that if you're not from China you have a better chance to be accepted. (Please, don't call me rasist, I simply share this information with you!)

    After you're accepted, you'll be studying together with all the students - Russian and foreign.

    Of course, they might accept a student without prep courses, but only if his works are outstanding. Even in such case, most surely they'll still require you take prep courses from February 1, so you can take only half the program. But, IMHO, this won't be enough for studying Russian. And without language no point to study art there.

    Actually, I didn't know they pay such serious attention to studying Russian. 4 hours a day all year, together with full time communication with Russians - will be enough to get your mind ready for the Master.

    All for now.

    Last edited by Book Guru; November 29th, 2010 at 08:52 AM.
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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    Today I want to post several reproductions of a former Academy's Teacher, Igor Kravtsov (26.03.1964 - 13.11.2010). Sudden heart attack, only three weeks ago...

    He died very young, leaving in dispair his family, Academy students who adored him, many friends who still can't believe it...
    A big loss for the Academy and for the Russian art as a whole.

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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    How long does the education take 3 years 4 years ? and what type of degree you get.

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    Setsuna801,

    It takes 6 years, but for foreign students 1 year of prep courses is necessary (5 hours of art studying, 4 hours of Russian language, 5 days a week, 9 months) - please see details in previous messages.
    The last, 6th year is concentrated on working on your diploma - a final artwork that will be examined, criticized, and graded by the Examining Board. After that you get your degree.

    The degree is equivalent to the Western Master of Arts. Many Russian students enter the Academy after 4 years at the Art College (and prior to that at least 5 years studying in art school), so they already have BA by the time of entrance.

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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    Okey I see. For now i am finishing my college degree in illustration but after that I'll be saving money and taking a school break before choosing betweet this school or the academy of art in new york, but I havent visited those schools or got no comment yet from people about those schools.

    what is the curriculum for the first and secound year ? by what I read it seems there is no lecture, so probably no theory of art history and modenr art ^^ or litterature

    And how is life there like in term of food and stuff, is it similar to canada or america ? I suppose I will need to find a job if I go to russia, is it difficult to get art related or non art related jobs

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    somewhat I think just the prep school can be very good to create a portfolio to enter whatever school you would want right?

    and the mos timportant question I have is

    IS there scholarship or finantial aid in russia or in the academy? or at least I suppose its possible toborrow loan from the bank

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    Setsuna801,

    First, I really recommend you to read the 1st page of this thread, as there was lots of information written by Lena Murray, who was organizing master classes at our Academy.
    That will answer to most of you questions.

    In regards of scholarship - unfortunately, no. All foreign students have to pay complete tuition. Only Russian citizens, if they sucessfully pass all the exams, have right to study there for free.

    And yes, prep courses is a good idea if you want to advance in your art studying. I'm quite sure this will give you a good start for any art institution worldwide.
    But if you spend the whole year in Russia, your Russian will be good enough to continue your study. Some do that for another 2-3 years (those who don't really need a diploma).
    In any case, not everyone gets through the whole 6-year program, not only foreign but Russian students either.

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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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  37. #49
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    Heard that repin teachers only visit their classes (on average) once a week to give critique and that most of the learning is done through learning from other students.
    Is this true and if so, won't it be much more efficient to go to a school like artac.org where they have translators and fulltime teachers?
    (since they would be paying about the same).

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    Hyskoa,

    I'm not familiar with a teaching system at the Artac.org.
    And I wouldn't like to compare that school to our Academy, as my point of view would be obviously biased.
    As far as I know, the only professor in their list that teaches at the Russian Art Academy is Gennady Manasherov. But since he's a full-time professor at the Repin's, I don't understand how they list his name, as he can't teach simultaneously at two remote locations.

    I definitely can comment on "visit their classes once a week". Yes, I was also saying something like that.
    But the point is exactly in your parenthesis - "on average".
    Professor can be on business trip, on exhibition, he could get sick, etc. So yes, sometimes he is in class only once a week, but sometimes every day. It depends.
    Why is it always mentioned that you "learn from other students"? - Because "social being determines consciousness" - and I truly believe in this.
    Only studying together with those who competed with you at exams, only continuing the competition (though a friendly one, as during 6 years of being in a very small selected group you become like a family), you polish your skills. Besides, you'll be studying some disciplines with other students from other departments - sculptors, graphic artists...

    The bottom line is, you can compare their students works with the ones made by students at our Academy. Again, I don't want to comment on this. Use your own judgement:

    - Artac.org
    - Russian Art Academy

    Last edited by Book Guru; December 13th, 2010 at 02:04 AM. Reason: updated the link
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    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    Yes, but what if the other students all know perfect russian and you don't? The introyear isn't going to give a huge difference no?

    Also, do you have any work that 3rd year students have made at repin? Since artac is a 3 year program.

    Although, to be completely fair, to get into repin, you already need a decent level no? Even I got into artac and my level surely wasn't good enough to even consider repin.

    I'm not trying to be inflammatory in my questions, just honest debate.

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    ok I read the biginning it answers a lot of question.

    But something I want to know but this I would have to ask to the un iversities themselve. Lets say I want to pursue in another academy or university probably with the skills achieved and experience, I would get some credit, since this program is in a russia university academy.

    I wonder how is there architectural program, I will check the website

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  45. #53
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    Hyskoa,

    First, I updated that link, so now it shows more works by the students.
    Translation option is in the bottom, left side.

    Under each drawing there is something looks like "III k", "IV k", etc. - this means "3rd year", "4th year", etc. So this will give you some kind of idea on students' level and progression.
    I can find more images from the 3rd year of studying, if you'd like; will post them here a bit later.

    And you're not being "inflammatory in your questions" at all. Please feel comfortable to ask any kind of questions. Again, if I'm not familiar with the subject, I have enough sources to find out.

    In regards of Russian language.
    At prep courses, you'll be studying Russian 4 hours a day, 5 days a week, almost all year. Besides all your surroundings will be in Russian. Obviously, during your language lessons a big emphasis is given to all the art terminology you need to learn.
    And yes, professors take in consideration that you're a foreign student, so if something is unclear, it's always better to ask, they'll explain. Again, there will be other students with you all the time, whom you can always ask for help (Russians don't smile a lot but they are friendly).

    From my own practice of studying language in foreign country: first 3 months is a horrible headache, in 6 months you're able to answer the phone without shaking hands, in 12 months you realize you don't look at people lips any longer - to "read" what they say.

    Your preparation level.
    As far as I know, at prep courses they will accept you with any kind of portfolio. Afterall, you pay, and it's only you who should show the progress as a result of studying there. As I've mentioned earlier, these courses are enough to make you ready for any kind of art institution.
    ----

    Setsuna801,

    I don't think you'll find anything at the Academy website.
    That sit is a mystery even to many Russians, as it's quite limited on sharing any information.

    You can check www.Practicum.org - in the top menu choose "Education" --> "Russia" - this will open page with several articles. Google-translate option is in the left bottom, but these articles are valuable because of many photos.

    There is also a source of info with entrance exams and photos about Architectural Faculty. It's on Russian Facebook (vKontakte.ru), but that's a closed source, requires registration.

    First, start with the articles I suggested above, then I'll answer if something is unclear.

    www.4-art.org - art educational books
    www.Practicum.org - art educational portal
    guru@4-art.org - my direct e-mail
    Russian Academy of Arts thread - all about it

    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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  47. #54
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    Hyskoa,

    Here are the samples of works from the 3rd year studying at the Academy.
    I decided to include not only drawings, but sketches as well, as they also get grades each semester.

    //Though I prefer figure drawings to landscapes, I find the second piece at the bottom amazing, the one with a bush. To show so much sun and light without any colors... Excellent work.//

    Attached Images Attached Images                      
    www.4-art.org - art educational books
    www.Practicum.org - art educational portal
    guru@4-art.org - my direct e-mail
    Russian Academy of Arts thread - all about it

    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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  49. #55
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    Interview with director of St. Petersburg Academy, Semyon Mikhailovsky, is in the latest american painting video magazine.

    Fall issue 10$
    http://www.americanpaintingvideomaga...load_page.html

    He mentioned a new website for the academy thats in the works and also expressed his desire to generate more publicity for the school. If it wasn't for conceptart/lena_murray/book guru we would still be left in the dark on this topic.

    There is also a 55 page booklet about the school "Soviet Art from the Academy" This is part of a student exhibition exchange with the New York Academy of Art in 1988. Most of the work in the booklet is from late 50's early 60's:

    http://www.amazon.com/Soviet-Art-Aca...2310830&sr=1-2

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    The~Tramp,

    Any chance to hear that interview by Mikhailovsky without paying 10 bucks...?

    It's just we've heard all this many times, but no changes yet.
    It's not expensive but to pay $10 to hear this again... nope.

    I wish I knew the book you've mentioned, but I've never heard of that one (I believe it exists, but I think a very small amount of copies were printed).
    The link you gave doesn't give any additional information, no images.
    So if anyone has samples (or at least its cover), please post it here, I'll really appreciate it.

    www.4-art.org - art educational books
    www.Practicum.org - art educational portal
    guru@4-art.org - my direct e-mail
    Russian Academy of Arts thread - all about it

    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    No chance that I am aware of. The interview is conducted by Peter Trippi, editor of Fine Art Connoiser. The video shows some of the cast collection at the school. Looks like they have more than a few . Runtime about 11mins.

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    I will post some images from the booklet tomorrow.


    What happens with Graduates of the academy. Are they showing in any gallery's? Do they sell work in Russia or abroad? I found some here,
    http://academart.com

    Theres a Gallery near where I live that primarily sells russian art. Not sure if any are from Repin.
    http://www.mccartheygallery.net/


    Looking at my books, I wonder what has become of some of these artists. Specifically, Anthob E. IO (russian spelling?) on pg. 14,15,22,23,87,92,93,111 of Student Drawings by Mogilevtsev. His drawings are rather good,

    Last edited by The~Tramp; December 16th, 2010 at 04:43 AM.
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    The~Tramp,

    Gosh, sometimes you ask such questions!

    1. What happens to the graduates? I personally don't know - until I know.
    I mean, some graduates, like Blokhin, Bernadsky, Kaluta, Bazanova, Savkuev - I know them personally, but these are the artists that have been in the art scene for guite a long time.
    Many graduates are from different regions and countries, often they come back to their homeland.
    Though some prefer to stay in St.Petersburg, especially if they've been already spotted by galleries and art collectors. Competition is very high though.
    I don't think any school in the world monitors their graduates' progress, but for sure gets very proud if he/she becomes sucessful.

    2. The Gallery link you posted, shows our artists, definitely with academic background. But they're dead now.
    Plastov - is a graduate of Stroganov Academy (Moscow); Krantz - was taking private lessons from academically trained artists (though he graduated from the Architectural Institute; I personally think this actually helped him in his artistic career as his compositions are increadibly balanced and thoughtful); Grigory Tchainikov just died recently, a graduate of Surikov Art Institute (Tsyplakov workshop), and then studied and worked at Tkatchiov workshop in Moscow. Etc..

    3. The one you liked, is Antonov. I don't know about him yet.
    Among many others in the book I also like Tchernyshei. She has such a delicate touch, her works show such admiration of the subject that I fall in love with everything presented in her works. I don't know her personally (yet), but I really hope some day her name will be heard by many.
    (her works are pages 74,78,98,100,104,149,150,151,159, and others)

    I also find her sketches to be a great examples of "how the sketches should be done".
    Here is a couple of samples. And this was done already in the middle of her studying, 3rd and 4th year.

    Btw, the last one, at the bottom (a girl sketch) was used as a cover by Chinese publisher; the book I think is sold now at Nucleus (though in Chinese, as most the books published in China on Repin Institute).

    Attached Images Attached Images      
    www.4-art.org - art educational books
    www.Practicum.org - art educational portal
    guru@4-art.org - my direct e-mail
    Russian Academy of Arts thread - all about it

    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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    as promised. (booklet is b&w unfortunately)
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    First Year Drawing:
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    First Year Painting:
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    Second Year Painting:
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    Third Year Painting:
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    Sixth Year - Diploma Paintings
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    Last edited by The~Tramp; December 16th, 2010 at 04:40 AM.
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    The~Tramp,

    Thank you much!!
    I've already sent this link to my Academy friends.
    I'm quite sure no one (except a couple of people who visited NYC at that time) knows or remembers this book. I'll wait for their comments though.
    As it's in English, so I guess it was published and sold in the US, mostly probably during exhibition only. Seems like it was never sold here, in Russia. Too bad.

    In return, I'm posting the images from Practicum.org -
    another excellent article on the Academy's Painting Faculty, the workshop of religious and historical painting (re-established in 1993). It's guided by a person of an incredible talent and modesty, excellent draftsman, Alexander Krylov.

    Here are the samples that I post here with a permission of a group admin from the mentioned earlier Russian social net, vKontakte.ru.

    All the samples shown here present works made by students of the 2nd year of studying at Krylov's workshop, photos taken during an exhibition at the Academy that closes today.

    Attached Images Attached Images              
    www.4-art.org - art educational books
    www.Practicum.org - art educational portal
    guru@4-art.org - my direct e-mail
    Russian Academy of Arts thread - all about it

    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
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