Environment: Narrow creek
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Thread: Environment: Narrow creek

  1. #1
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    You need to separate your elements. I cant tell where the sun starts and where the water ends. Also this is looking more like a slow river than a creek. The rocks/trees look too soft, go back with a harder brush to show foreground, midground, and background.

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    Get rid of that lighting effect. All it's doing is killing the composition, obscuring everything being distracting. If this is concept art, there should be more focus on the environment. Speaking of which, there's nothing really going on in it. You've just got banks and some vegetation. That would be okay if the focus was on mood, but the blown out lighting effect gets rid of any mood.

    Almost all of your edges are equally blurry and undefined. There's nothing wrong with undefined edges, but you have to use them in concert with edges of different quality. For example, the rocks closest to us would have more defined edges (assuming you get rid of the lighting effect). Varying your edges will tell the viewer more about the object and it will separate your elements more. Value is also something you need to think about to separate your objects and layers. You only have a few values in your environment. That and the blurry edges makes everything look the same.

    I did a paintover to help me explain what I was thinking and to get my head around it. Something I noticed right away is that almost all of your values are really dark. Your absolute dark is only about 2%. You can get the effect of having 'the really dark parts' in a painting but still have them light enough to carry information. Also, when you paint, wait until near the end to add in your darkest darks and lightest lights. I think what happened is that you made the shadows almost black from near the beginning, and then you didn't feel right making the light parts of the ground anything brighter than about 40%.

    Something I've also done is add a focal point. There is nothing to your composition. Nothing to look at and no point for the eye to rest.
    Also, think about having dark things on light things and light things on dark things. This will separate your elements and make the image easier to read.

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    I think the light source is way too big, personally I would tone it down. And I agree with the first comment, the pic is too muddy. I think the rocks in the forground need to be much sharper.

    Did you use a ref for this pic?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Craz View Post
    ...
    Thank you mate for huge and usefull advices, really appreciate that. As I said I have just started to teach myself at concept art and this is my 5th work ever, for that it looks like work from beginner. But I tried improve it with your advices. Result is there:



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    Quote Originally Posted by MassDet View Post
    I think the light source is way too big, personally I would tone it down. And I agree with the first comment, the pic is too muddy. I think the rocks in the forground need to be much sharper.

    Did you use a ref for this pic?
    ofcourse not

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    Big improvement.

    Two more things:

    The water on the left that passes between the foreground rocks and rocky overhang- it's too much like the value of the foreground rocks. I suggest throwing some light onto the rocks that border it in the composition. The light would have to be from some source other than the sun, since it would have to be coming from off screen to the left. That would make the separation between the rocks and water clearer. I suggest a warm light for more clarity and interest. You've broken that area up fairly well with the shrubbery, but I think it needs this further push.

    You have the same problem with the rock that is jutting out It's possible to make this rock of such a form that its silhouette doesn't change much and we don't see any of the planes that are getting hit with significant light from the sun. Basically, if we only see the shadowed planes of that rock, it would be a dark shape on a light area, and therefore readable.

    Overall, I want you to think less about 'how would the lighting realistically look?' and more about 'where do I need my light for the composition to work'. This is called using your lighting instead of being used by it.

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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tr79 View Post
    ofcourse not
    I can't see what should be 'of course' about that.

    Using references is not a shame, quite the contrary. I suggest you start using them.

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