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Thread: my art

  1. #1
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    my art

    Hi my name is Joe Herrera, I am a pursuing artist just want to see what you guys think of my art. Ive never been formally trained and am surrounded by tons of amazing artist on this site. I fully welcome any critique from everyone and/or likes or dislikes. I want to do this as my career and have been drawing my whole life, but at the moment im working a factory job that is supporting my family but they force me to work overtime up to 90 hours if they wanted me to. I really dont want that for the rest of my life and god gave me a talent and i really wish i could use it in a career. Its all i want. So i hope you enjoy my artwork and if there is anybody out there to give my art dreams a kick start in the right direction please give me some advice. It would literally mean the world to me. Thanks again for your time.

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  3. #2
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    Characters look a bit stiff, try to exaggerate it more.

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  4. #3
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    a book that helped me out significantly and that i think would help you out as well is one titled "figure drawing without a model" by ron tiner. you can get it for $14 new on amazon.

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  5. #4
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    thanks guys i really appreciate any help i can get. keep them coming!

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  6. #5
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    Nice drawins, but I really dont see anything special. I need a bt more action for these guys, they look very static

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    thanks cakeman, just wondering though what you mean by static? Im willing to listen to any constructive criticism you have, any ideas on what i can do to make it better?

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  8. #7
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    yea, i have to agree with the other members, your characters look too stiff, try adding more motion to your drawings, maybe more dynamic poses of a better sense of fluidity/motion. Look around for pictures of people running jumping etc. and try and mimic the anatomy shown there, might help

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    you just need to add more motion in joints and show the body moving more. your on the right track but nothing helps more than practice. whenever you get a chance draw random poses, gestures look at anatomy. keep it up.

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  10. #9
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    Stop imitating comics and start looking at real people.

    At fineart.sk you can get "Figure Drawing for All It's Worth" by Andrew Loomis. It will provide you with more resources for drawing a convincing comic book hero than ten thousand Marvel comic books.

    Someone has also suggested Tiner's "Figure Drawing Without a Model"; I agree, it's a good book, especially since Tiner works in comics. I could add Sheppard's "Drawing the Living Figure" - there are few better demonstrations of visual anatomy.

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  11. #10
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    This might be more suited to the 'sketchbook' forum where people are trawling for work to critique.

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    I think you should have to create more realistic and motion in body to make it real life.Extensively illustrated using a wide range of styles and techniques.
    Beginning with informal sketchbook studies and a brief summary of anatomical structure before going on to explain figure movement and how the body shows its age and exudes character, it will encourage to all artist.

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  13. #12
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    More life studies, less copy pasta from photos (yes, it makes your girl look flat).

    The others need references - it's really obvious when you're just guessing.

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    MiniGoth i don't really understand what you are saying here. I don't want you to think i'm offended because i'm open to criticism to better myself. But they way i'm reading your reply sounds like you think i'm copying from photos. I assure you that all my work is original and i just pull it from my thoughts. I wont lie that i study many other artist to see their techniques Jim Lee, John Romita Jr., Steve Mcniven, David Finch, Adam Hughes, Frank Cho, the kuberts, Greg Land, Copiel and Marko Djurdjevic just to name some. But i promise that it isn't copied. And could you please explain yourself more in depth of what you mean by its really obvious when im just guessing.

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  15. #14
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    As I mentioned in response to your PM - there's nothing wrong with copying a photo to study, or anything else.

    The problem is the lack of understanding of 3d objects, space, and construction that often comes as a result.

    Using the photos should be PART of the program of study, not all of it.

    Magazine photos are a terrible place to get anatomy information from, between the Photoshop and lens distortion that comes with the image. Also, cool lighting in a photo doesn't tend to lend itself to being a great reference.

    I see a lot of copying from artists you admire in your work, but not a whole lot of trying to build up skills through life drawing and construction studies.

    You need more of that sorta stuff.

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  16. #15
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    Try drawing from life more and also check out the books: Bridgman's Complete Guide to Drawing from Life, Figure Drawing for All Its Worth, and Drawing Essentials.

    Also, I don't think sketches like this belong in the Entertainment and Concept Art forum; you should probably have these in a sketchbook thread. Keep working hard.

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  17. #16
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    here are some more. let me know what you think.

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    Oh by the way, I believe i read somewhere before that Joe Queseda (editor n chief of marvel comics) said that one of the first things he looks at is how an artist draws hands. So i gave it a try. This was done with no photo referencing, let me know what you think. sorry for the crappy bleed through my scanner made.

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  19. #18
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    Same issues as all the others. Now go study light and shadow, shading, anatomy.

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    A tribute to my Uncle Isaac who passed away last Thursday.

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    Very nice pictures, but just one comment, I would see original things because the superheroes are very used.

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    Hi,

    Really verynice drawings. I really appreciate your art as i dont know how to draw also. I always struggle hard to do it. But are these pics ur own creativity or drawn seeing any pic.

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  23. #22
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    I agree with most of the previous stuff said in this thread.

    It indeed looks very flat and stiff. You should try practise a lot of life drawing. If possible go to a croquis class, where you draw short poses. Just to get the pose of the figure. Afterall if you don't got the figure, pose and contruction right to begin with, then it doesn't matter how much you work on it, it will still look "wrong" (eventhough such a term doesn't excist in the world of art)

    What you also could do, is to grab your sketch book, go to the streets or mall, and draw quick sketches of people shopping, working and whatever people are up to. I myself find this as a really good training.

    Best of luck on your drawings.

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  24. #23
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    Thanks alot guys i appreciate your comments. and yes Richard12 all of the character art is from my imagination. It has taken years of practice to get where i am and i still have so much more room for growth. I actually am going to c2e2 in chicago this weekend to turn in my portfolio to marvel and dc. so wish me luck. Also a word of advice that helped me alot is something Jim Lee (dc comic artist) said. Drawing the human figure is like putting together legos from different angles. So learn every part of the body seperatly then when you feel you get good enough put them all together like lego blocks. I think alot of people dont understand my artwork saying its not realistic enough, and as i appreciate their comments i think my art is misunderstood. A comic artist can have any kind of style to have in their artwork. Some realistic, some cartoon, and everything in between. I believe my art is the traditional cartoon art and less of the realistic. So when people tell me to study life art i kind of shrug that advice for two reasons. One thats not what im going for or trying to get across in my art. and two a comic penciler is there to set up work for the inkers, colorist, and writers which all three of those jobs help the "realism" come together. I really do not mean to sound concided because i myself am my own biggest critic. believe me. I am just trying to help you guys understand what i am trying for in my art. but please keep the suggestions, critiques, advice, or complements coming. I just hope to get advice based on the style i am using and not a search for realism in my art. Thanks again for your time in looking at my artwork. c2e2 here i come.

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  25. #24
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    Doing short life drawing sessions doesn't have to be about getting super realistic, it's about getting those poses to feel natural.

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  26. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    Thanks alot guys i appreciate your comments. and yes Richard12 all of the character art is from my imagination. It has taken years of practice to get where i am and i still have so much more room for growth. I actually am going to c2e2 in chicago this weekend to turn in my portfolio to marvel and dc. so wish me luck. Also a word of advice that helped me alot is something Jim Lee (dc comic artist) said. Drawing the human figure is like putting together legos from different angles. So learn every part of the body seperatly then when you feel you get good enough put them all together like lego blocks. I think alot of people dont understand my artwork saying its not realistic enough, and as i appreciate their comments i think my art is misunderstood. A comic artist can have any kind of style to have in their artwork. Some realistic, some cartoon, and everything in between. I believe my art is the traditional cartoon art and less of the realistic. So when people tell me to study life art i kind of shrug that advice for two reasons. One thats not what im going for or trying to get across in my art. and two a comic penciler is there to set up work for the inkers, colorist, and writers which all three of those jobs help the "realism" come together. I really do not mean to sound concided because i myself am my own biggest critic. believe me. I am just trying to help you guys understand what i am trying for in my art. but please keep the suggestions, critiques, advice, or complements coming. I just hope to get advice based on the style i am using and not a search for realism in my art. Thanks again for your time in looking at my artwork. c2e2 here i come.
    YOU sir are a childish idiot.

    first off, i cant believe someone could be so low as to create multiple accounts just to comment on their own art. yes, its that obvious.

    second, when someone says that you should study anatomy, to take some life drawing classes, etc. they're NOT trying to make you draw "realistically" or force you to draw in a specific "style". its so that you know the BASICS of anatomy. once you know the BASICS of anatomy you can twist and stretch it all you want because you'll understand how it can be twisted and stretched. but you need to KNOW how it works BEFORE you modify it.

    and im telling you now: YOU DO NOT KNOW HOW ANATOMY WORKS YET. YOU ARE GUESSING [like minigoth said].

    besides, when you get a feel for it you can draw in your own "style" FROM life. i do it all the time. i look at someone, take the pose and anatomy from LIFE and put my artistic twist on it. but the base MUST be there, it has to be BELIEVABLE. even in the most stylized drawings, the anatomy is BELIEVABLE and accurate (if the artist is worth a shit). you need that basic understanding FIRST.
    watch this vid, this dude draws in his own style from life:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ga6Wj...layer_embedded


    also: DO NOT study other artists. particularly comicbook artists, they're doing a stylized version of reality already. you need to study from life, or from life drawing books like bridgeman so that you understand the basics first.
    and quit throwing around comicbook artists names like you know the artists personally.
    you dont.
    doing that makes you look like a douchebag.

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  28. #26
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    YOU need a severe attidude & philosophy adjustment!

    capamerica23, YOU NEED TO GROW UP IF YOU HAVE ANY DESIRE TO BE A WORKING ILLUSTRATOR (or even if you wish to improve upon your skills as an illustrator hobbyist).

    Here's why:

    Whenever you wish to get better at something, you must open your mind to every other way of learning the craft that you love so much. More importantly, you must be able to understand how vital it is for you to have this working philosophy.

    If you don't, then you are making a conscious choice to stop learning. To stop growing your skills. To not using your brain at all for anything anymore.

    Once you've done that, then you're quite literally just jerking off with your pencil. Do I have to further illustrate that metaphor?

    Your art is NOT "the traditional cartoon art". It's not ANYTHING YET, because your work demonstrates your complete lack of experience or understanding! That you're not able to see that reality is to drive home the fact that you're not understanding what the hell you're even doing.

    YOU SHOULD KNOW THIS ALREADY! About the most important ability an illustrator needs is to be able to see your work for what it is, and how it compares to The Professional Standard.

    Standard being the key word. If you constantly come up with excuses about why you don't need to learn new things, then it's obvious that you have no standards at all. Everyone who wishes to better themselves must understand how they're not performing up to proper standards, whether it's in their illustration, their driving skills, their cooking, their health, or anything else.

    With the excuses you are giving about why you don't need to learn new things - and your total lack of understanding what those better standards really are - you demonstrate that you're not really serious about your drawing, even as a hobby.

    When you don't care about learning, then I can only conclude that you're posting your work here online only because you want an ego rub. You certainly don't want to be a part of any serious discussion about how to improve your work, which is the main thrust of this whole website.

    That being the case, then why ARE you posting your work? It's a waste of time. I refer you back to my masturbation metaphor. Best to do that in private, don't you think?

    Even at the age of 23 (which I assume because of your nickname), it is beyond arrogance of you to expect that any inker, letterer or colorist must pick up your slack to redraw and make better what you hacked down with your pencil onto paper. How rude.

    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    ...i think my art is misunderstood.
    Your work is NOT misunderstood. We understand it all too well. It is YOU that misunderstand what it takes to draw pictures well, or the work that goes into making yourself better, in any respect.

    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    ...a word of advice that helped me alot is something Jim Lee (dc comic artist) said. Drawing the human figure is like putting together legos from different angles. So learn every part of the body seperatly then when you feel you get good enough put them all together like lego blocks.
    Jim Lee gave you this advice as a means for you to be able to understand the basic building blocks (no pun intended) of how to start building a human form. He said this to you because he saw that your work is in no way cohesively put together, with the characters (or anything else) you're drawing. He did not give you the one and only key to success that will make you the next Jim Lee. He sees your work for what it is; nowhere near professional level.

    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    I really do not mean to sound concided because i myself am my own biggest critic. believe me. I am just trying to help you guys understand what i am trying for in my art.
    No, you're not your own biggest critic, by any means. To even say that shows how ignorantly arrogant you are. You are absolutely conceited (LEARN HOW TO SPELL, FOR CHRIST'S SAKE, YOU'RE 23 YEARS OLD!), and you are simply quite lazy.

    If you were your own biggest critic, then you would drive yourself toward LEARNING HOW TO DRAW, instead of staying in your masturbatory corner with your blinders on, not caring to better yourself.

    And being lazy as you are, not wanting to learn anything new, not wanting to do the hard work that EVERYONE has to do, you are in danger of hitting the age of 30, and still trying to get comic book work while working fast food or gas station jobs. And then 40, then 50... that will be sad. I hope your parents have a really comfortable basement for you to live in.

    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    A comic artist can have any kind of style to have in their artwork. Some realistic, some cartoon, and everything in between.
    But EVERY PROFESSIONAL has his or her basis in LEARNING HOW TO DRAW FROM LIFE! HOW IN THE BLOODY HELL DO YOU NOT KNOW THIS? HOW THE HELL CAN YOU NOT FIGURE THIS OUT? My God, sir... if you simply, oh I dunno... DO YOUR RESEARCH and read blogs such as Mike Manley's, or John Krisfalusi's (to give you 2 contrasting illustrators' stylizations), you'll find out that professionals (like you purport to want to be) all know how to draw FROM life to imbue life INTO their work!

    Learning how to draw is the same as learning a whole new language. You seem satisfied thinking that you can wander around Mexico or the USA only knowing Spanglish!

    How do you not know this?

    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    So when people tell me to study life art i kind of shrug that advice for two reasons. One thats not what im going for or trying to get across in my art. and two a comic penciler is there to set up work for the inkers, colorist, and writers which all three of those jobs help the "realism" come together.
    I see that you're ignorant, and with that comes arrogance, but what you say there makes me really feel like calling you stupid. Stupid because when you know you don't know something, that's ignorance; but when you choose not to learn that which you know you do not know - especially when it's required for you to get better at your chosen craft - THAT'S FUCKING STUPID.

    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    I am just trying to help you guys understand what i am trying for in my art.
    We all see what you're trying for in your art:
    - No effort
    - No standards
    - Laziness
    - Letting others (inkers/colorists/letterers) do the real work on the drawings
    - Basically, to get as much glory for being a comic book illustrator without really doing the hard work that you should be doing to earn any accolades that would come to anyone whose work deserves it

    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    I just hope to get advice based on the style i am using and not a search for realism in my art.
    TRANSLATION: I DON'T WANT ANYONE TO JUDGE MY WORK BASED UPON THE FACT THAT I DIDN'T GIVE A SHIT ENOUGH TO DO THE ACTUAL WORK IN THE FIRST PLACE.

    Quote Originally Posted by capamerica23 View Post
    I actually am going to c2e2 in chicago this weekend to turn in my portfolio to marvel and dc. so wish me luck... c2e2 here i come.
    I want you to pay close attention, because I am going to predict your future.

    You will not get hired by any comics company. Any editor or working professional who looks at your work will tell you basically what we're all telling you here, that you need to pull your head out of your ass and get to doing the hard work that everyone else must do.

    Anyone who doesn't tell you this will basically see that your work is at such an amateur level, they'll likely give you a nice platitude by saying something like, "nice work. keep practicing". You really need to understand why people say what they say to you.

    HOW DO YOU KNOW THAT I'M RIGHT IN TELLING YOU ALL OF THIS? HERE'S EXACTLY HOW YOU CAN CHECK MY ACCURACY:

    When the editors and professionals do not give you a good review of your work, I CHALLENGE YOU TO TELL THEM WHAT YOU HAVE TOLD US HERE, THAT YOU DO NOT BELIEVE YOU HAVE TO DRAW FROM LIFE.

    THEN ASK THEM WHAT YOU NEED TO DO TO IMPROVE YOUR WORK.

    Take a wild guess as to what they'll say? I can tell you right now. DRAW FROM LIFE, ALREADY! WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR??

    .......................

    You're 23 years old, and your work is nowhere near any kind of professional level, in any way, shape or form. You don't even know how to draw perspective.

    If you don't (I'll say it again) pull your head out of your ass and start understanding that you must LEARN like everyone else does, then you're in danger of wasting a good decade of your life fooling yourself into thinking you have a chance in hell of getting any kind of work whatsoever.

    At this rate, it's not gonna happen.

    Now come back from your comics convention and be honest about the editors' & professionals' critiques of your work.

    I DARE YOU.

    Last edited by magnut; April 26th, 2010 at 03:19 PM.
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    Magnut and dirt syndicate and everyone else. I owe you guys an apology. I know i have lots of room for growth. and you are correct in everything you are saying. Im sure you guys are and have been for a long time working hard on your artwork, and to say what i have said has been a mockery and i deserve everthing that has been said. I apologize and wish i could take it back. You are correct and i didnt get hired at c2e2, but i did get a lot of good tips and pointers and got cb cebulski's (marvel head talent scout) personal card, and it was the greatest learning experience of my life. I have been humbled not only by you but by my chicago experience. By the way i dont have seperate accounts to comment on here and to those people that did give me good comments on here thank you but these guys are right i have a lot more to learn and a long way to go. I will practice and study life art as i have been recommended. Again and i dont think i can say this enough im really really sorry and hope you guys can still care to see me hopefully progress in the future. Thanks for your time.

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    Way to step up!

    capamerica23,

    Good.

    Now take to heart what DirtSyndicate said, and understand that these things you're needing to learn are to be used as a springboard toward you being able to represent your interpretation of life into whatever cartoony or realistic way you wish.

    You really need to understand perspective. I have posted a quickie perspective tutorial on ConceptArt before. You should take a look.

    Bill Watterson - His Calvin & Hobbes characters are all a collection of circles, squares & triangles, and all cartoony looking. But he represents the most believable characters ever to be produced by anyone. They are as full of life as any other characters (live or animated) around.

    Todd McFarlane - His work has always been extremely exaggerated, with his characters' cartoony faces, cauliflower ears & polio-stricken hands that he draws. Over the years, his work has improved, but he still exhibits these characteristics in his work. BUT, in the context of his work, he's able to successfully demonstrate great power in his characters, or great sexiness in his female characters. McFarlane's work will never be photo-representative, but will always be unique and powerful, which has made him greatly successful.

    Both these (along with so many others) illustrators' 'mistakes' in anatomy and such are considered to be THEIR STYLISTIC CHOICES. Their unique approaches to their visuals are key in what makes them attractive to so many people who buy their work. BUT THEY DID THE HARD WORK OF LEARNING HOW TO DRAW FROM LIFE FIRST.

    What better example to realize the need for understanding why you should be drawing from life?

    Here it is: it's one of the most difficult things you'll ever end up doing, but the payoff for you will be like GOLD. You need to take a sketchbook with you wherever you go, and you must draw - IN INK ONLY - everything you see. Pick an angle on wherever you are (restaurant, park, living room, shopping mall, wherever), and you need to recreate EVERY DETAIL, in perspective, IN INK ONLY.

    Why? You don't want to do a bad drawing. No one does. But this will show you how bad you are, and hopefully you'll understand what you need to do to improve yourself.

    Before you get to the level of a finished drawing, you simply MUST get comfortable with doing the very messy, sloppy, ugly sketch that helps you almost 'feel' your way through a drawing. It allows you to get all those mistakes out of the way, so you can get to a finished drawing that looks less stiff, less flat, and more believable.

    So, when you CONSTANTLY draw in your sketchbook IN INK ONLY, you are forced to be deliberate with your linework, making sure that every line you place is the correct one. This is about the best exercise you'll ever get when you're in your formative years as an artist. This is what will discipline yourself, making you become more and more comfortable in taking the risks and making the confident linework decisions you need in order to accomplish a convincing drawing.

    I promise that you will be severely annoyed by taking my advice. But just like any underdeveloped skinny guys, or lazy heavyset guys (like myself, with too many years of constant deadlines, my ass glued to my chair), all this new exercise will make you want to crawl into a hole and sleep for a year. It will hurt. It will ache nonstop.

    But after a while, when your artistic 'muscles' begin to strengthen, your instincts will start to blend well with your ever-increasing skills! With your ability to identify when things/what things go wrong, you'll start to also be able to identify when things/what things are going RIGHT in your drawing!

    And yes, my suggestion includes you drawing people, animals, and anything organic IN INK ONLY in your sketchbook.

    As for your perspective, you should read some tutorials on how to do basic perspective. Along with working in your sketchbook, you'll get a better sense of how to develop your instincts in this area.

    ............

    Here's something you must be mentally prepared for:


    Considering the level your drawing is at now, you must be prepared in your mind for the fact that even if you improve at a pretty steady pace, it's extremely likely that it's going to take you 4-6 years to get yourself to any kind of professional level.

    I'm factoring in your current work schedule and family responsibilities.

    So, if this is what you truly want, then now's the time to get going. Be open to learning everything you can. Be smart enough to learn the technology that's available to you (Photoshop, Illustrator, etc.). Be the learning sponge that you must be in order to get yourself to better & greater levels.

    And pay close attention to the very good advice that TheDirtSyndicate will be giving you in his next posting. He knows what he's talking about.

    Good luck.

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  31. #29
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    i just have to say that both dirty and mag are 100% right on. the fact that these two guys would be so blunt serves as a testament to the truth that they are presenting you with. i hope you realize the kindness that they have done as they have laid out the truths that are required to be a successful artist. the best way that you could thank them is to put your actions to use and start producing on a daily basis. i tip my hat to both of you dirty and mag.

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  32. #30
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    Capamerica23, for what it's worth, I think you're pretty good right now, even if you could be better.

    Everything is better with dinosaurs.
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