What is your method of measuring human proportions when you draw from your mind?
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: What is your method of measuring human proportions when you draw from your mind?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    42
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    What is your method of measuring human proportions when you draw from your mind?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Manhattan, NY
    Posts
    737
    Thanks
    347
    Thanked 288 Times in 256 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    For me, I don't use measurements. I just draw draw draw figures from photos and from life so I can understand the proportions of the figure and the forms, that way I can position them and project the figure any way I like, although I still need a lot of practice . Those measurements that Loomis and Bridgman and others give you will fall apart as soon as the body is bent or tilted the slightest, so it's essentially worthless to spend time studying them. Just learn how the lengths of the masses relate to each other.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    257
    Thanks
    57
    Thanked 51 Times in 46 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I would not say that those measurements are worthless. In fact, I would say that they are just the opposite. When I start any character drawing, I use those proportions. Once I have the basic figure drawn out, I will use them to set the character in my scene, taking prespective into account.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to darkwolf29a For This Useful Post:


  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    42
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by cdejong View Post
    For me, I don't use measurements. I just draw draw draw figures from photos and from life so I can understand the proportions of the figure and the forms, that way I can position them and project the figure any way I like, although I still need a lot of practice . Those measurements that Loomis and Bridgman and others give you will fall apart as soon as the body is bent or tilted the slightest, so it's essentially worthless to spend time studying them. Just learn how the lengths of the masses relate to each other.
    I'm just trying to memorize the proportions as drawing from life isn't really helping me much.

    i will look back at my books when i need but i feel like im not learning when im not memorizing things.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    OmenSpirits's Avatar
    OmenSpirits is offline Commercial-Illustrator in-training, NOT an artist. Level 13 Gladiator: Retiarius
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,826
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 1,042 Times in 680 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Draw what you draw, then look at the book to compare correctness, then correct errors.

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Noo Yawk
    Posts
    2,176
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 776 Times in 461 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've pretty much got the proportions and anatomy down and memorized.

    Amateur Artist. Professional Asshole.

    Lookit the Pretty!

    Rule #1 of depicting soldiers: KEEP THE DAMN FINGER OFF THE DAMN TRIGGER.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Zazerzs's Avatar
    Zazerzs is offline ....bing me the bore worms Level 7 Gladiator: Samnite
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    866
    Thanks
    449
    Thanked 337 Times in 227 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I would suggest going with the 8 head break down. Its widely used.

    There are other methods, the square unit of the cranium for example, which would be fine also.

    Check out Loomis

    for vid tuts, you can check out Riven Phoenix.

    learning a set of proportions will give you the freedom to deviate from them intelligently. So when you want to draw an arm that's longer than what is considered the standard length you know you are doing it on purpose, not by happenstance.

    Last edited by Zazerzs; January 12th, 2010 at 03:23 PM.
    "Talent is a word found in the mouth of the lazy to dismiss the hard work of those who have achieved."
    Anatomy Thread
    Sketchbook
    Interested in learning more about color? Read this!
    Fletcher:Color Control
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Black Spot's Avatar
    Black Spot is offline Pew, Pew, Pew Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    9,696
    Thanks
    3,228
    Thanked 5,370 Times in 3,593 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    Whatever suits the character.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    108
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    What about those articulated wooden models? Do they help at all with basic anatomy? Does anyone use them?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    2,081
    Thanks
    323
    Thanked 968 Times in 519 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by lmeden View Post
    What about those articulated wooden models? Do they help at all with basic anatomy? Does anyone use them?
    I think they are best as just something to draw, an object like the old cube, sphere, cone etc. As for helping with drawing people, eh, maybe to get general proportions, or maybe to study basic foreshortening, but it's pretty limited in usefulness. The poses it is capable of are limited and nothing like how a person stands. It's also not carved into any kind of useful planes to study, so... why the hell is it so popular? I haven't a clue. I'd actually argue that some action figures are more useful (I know I have a Superman that I can pose more realistically than any wooden manikin).

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Malmö, Sweden
    Posts
    2,136
    Thanks
    1,313
    Thanked 1,313 Times in 672 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When drawing from mind I try to recall what I know of proportions and positions. Then I draw and check with a ref to see if I got it right..
    Most often I lay down a basic figure with head, chest and hips drawn in square and go from there.
    Other times I let my subconscious guide me


    Do what you love ~ Love what you do
    Sketchbook|Blog|DeviantArt





    Check out
    FrozZt
    ManMadeGod
    Mokinzi
    Ryn
    Spaggen
    TwoListen
    UmpaArt


    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #12
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Gdansk, Poland
    Posts
    4,834
    Thanks
    887
    Thanked 1,568 Times in 754 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When I started learning figure I mostly used 8 heads canon. It gave me something to grasp at the beginning but it was pretty tedious to make all the measurements every time I sketched character. It was also difficult to draw more complicated poses with foreshortening and body twists. Nowadays I rely more on subconscious and muscle memory from drawing hundreds of gestures. For example I lightly draw some squiggle in place where should be torso, judge whether it looks right or not and correct accordingly. Still there's a lot to learn when it comes to anatomy and proportions. After doing thousands of studies I still tend to make basic mistakes from time to time which can be really frustrating.

    Wood manikin turned out to be useless for poses because it's all stiff but I used it several times for figuring out basic lightning (where the arm casts shadow, which part of the body is the brightest etc.)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #13
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    dpaint posted a list of relative sizes and relationships between parts of the body the other day, you may find it useful.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  16. #14
    dpaint's Avatar
    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,648
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 5,878 Times in 2,354 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah, it went over like a turd in a punchbowl, but the information is sound.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •