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  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ErikAlbany View Post
    hi,
    I have a question about the low chroma ring. When its said that the color is to be mixed with grey, its apparent that the grey is 50/50 black and white.
    Actually no, he's using a different grey to neutralize each hue, because his aim is to change the chroma without changing the value. The basic idea is to neutralize each pure colour with a grey of the same value. In practice the value of the mixture will drop a bit for many colours, but it's still easier to control than neutralizing with the complementary.



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  4. #15
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    Hey Ron,

    Just wanted to say thanks for this, it may be incomplete but there is more than enough there that we can use and can study :-)

    So just wanted to drop a quick line and just let you know that me and 2 of my art friends are enjoying this a lot :>


  5. #16
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    Hey, I just want to thank you. This is really great! Now, on to enlightenment lol.
    kudos! :3


  6. #17
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    fredflickstone
    thankyou so much for this. i have read many books and tutorials on the net and this is by far the most down to bass tacks than anything i have come across i finaly am starting to understand color=value!!!


  7. #18
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    i do have one quick question. i mainly work in water colors, and im finding it difficult to figure out how to getthe different croma key scales in my particular medium. ihope this make sense.thankyou


  8. #19
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    great post

    Great post.

    I would caution at the use of black though to adjust colors, doing so usually kills the color, deadins it in a way. Instead create your "black" by mixing the 3 colors of the main triad of the color key of the piece, that way if you mix it in with any of your stonger, brighter colors it will reduce them but with out the same color deading effect. I would advise bringing down the value of a color by other ways of mixing and then using the created black for its final value reduction.

    here is some more information on the subject of color, pallets, blending ect. that will explain what im trying to say.

    Fletcher: Colour Control http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=157251

    Last edited by Zazerzs; June 8th, 2009 at 01:31 PM.
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  9. #20
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    Thanks fred

    As a beginner, I found this very useful. Will no doubt help me choose colors more wisely.

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  10. #21
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    You did great job, thank you a lot for sharing this!


  11. #22
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    Wonderful tutorial. Thanks for sharing!

    I have been trying to learn color theory on my own, and I've recently come across Parramon's Color Theory book. The first thing I noticed, however, is that he comes up with a slightly different color wheel (thus giving us different complementary colors)... Here is the color wheel he uses: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink (not attaching the image here because this is Ron's thread...but you can follow the link to see it).

    He claims, among other things, that "yellow" is the complementary of "blue". See here: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink

    Is there any explanation for this difference in color wheel? Is Parramon's wheel simply "wrong" or "inaccurate", or is he making use of a different color model instead?

    Thanks a lot in advance for the help!

    Last edited by bkkm; November 24th, 2009 at 11:27 AM.

  12. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkkm View Post
    Wonderful tutorial. Thanks for sharing!

    I have been trying to learn color theory on my own, and I've recently come across Parramon's Color Theory book. The first thing I noticed, however, is that he comes up with a slightly different color wheel (thus giving us different complementary colors)... Here is the color wheel he uses: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink (not attaching the image here because this is Ron's thread...but you can follow the link to see it).

    He claims, among other things, that "yellow" is the complementary of "blue". See here: http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo...eat=directlink

    Is there any explanation for this difference in color wheel? Is Parramon's wheel simply "wrong" or "inaccurate", or is he making use of a different color model instead?
    Ron isn't around much these days, so I'll try to answer.
    Ron is using the traditional artist's color wheel, which is based on pigment mixing, while Parramon is using one based on the behavior of light and vision, which gives you different sets of compliments. For details, check out David Briggs' site huevaluchroma.com, specifically the section on hue.


    Tristan Elwell
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